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1. Ferraz JG, Martins AL, de Souza JF, Matos A, Canto AP, Martins AM: Metastatic tumor of squamous cell carcinoma from uterine cervix to heart: ante-mortem diagnosis. Arq Bras Cardiol; 2006 Oct;87(4):e104-7
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  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] Metastatic tumor of squamous cell carcinoma from uterine cervix to heart: ante-mortem diagnosis.
  • The pathological examination revealed metastasis of squamous cells with well-differentiated infiltrative areas.
  • Four months later, however, she was readmitted to hospital in terminal stage, confirming the guarded prognosis of the disease at this stage.
  • [MeSH-major] Carcinoma, Squamous Cell / secondary. Heart Neoplasms / secondary. Uterine Cervical Neoplasms / pathology


2. Yokoyama A, Mizukami T, Omori T, Yokoyama T, Hirota T, Matsushita S, Higuchi S, Maruyama K, Ishii H, Hibi T: Melanosis and squamous cell neoplasms of the upper aerodigestive tract in Japanese alcoholic men. Cancer Sci; 2006 Sep;97(9):905-11
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  • [Title] Melanosis and squamous cell neoplasms of the upper aerodigestive tract in Japanese alcoholic men.
  • Melanosis is frequently observed in the upper aerodigestive tract of Japanese alcoholic men, and the prevalences of squamous cell dysplasia and SCC in the upper aerodigestive tract of Japanese alcoholic men are high.
  • This study evaluated associations between melanosis and both neoplasms of the upper aerodigestive tract and factors contributing to the development of melanosis in Japanese alcoholic men.
  • The presence of melanosis indicates a high risk for neoplasms in the upper aerodigestive tract of Japanese alcoholic men.
  • Melanosis and neoplasms have the same causes, including older age, heavy smoking, and high acetaldehyde exposure.
  • [MeSH-major] Alcoholism / complications. Carcinoma, Squamous Cell / epidemiology. Head and Neck Neoplasms / epidemiology. Melanosis / epidemiology. Respiratory System / pathology. Upper Gastrointestinal Tract / pathology


3. Mazlina S, Putra SH, Shiraz MA, Hazim MY, Roszalina R, Abdul AR: Maxillary sinus tumours--a review of twenty-nine patients treated by maxillectomy approach. Med J Malaysia; 2006 Aug;61(3):284-7
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  • Inverted papilloma (50%) was the commonest benign tumour and squamous cell carcinoma (36%) was the commonest malignancy.
  • [MeSH-major] Maxilla / surgery. Maxillary Sinus Neoplasms / surgery
  • [MeSH-minor] Adult. Carcinoma, Squamous Cell / surgery. Female. Humans. Male. Middle Aged. Papilloma, Inverted / surgery. Retrospective Studies

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  • (PMID = 17240576.001).
  • [ISSN] 0300-5283
  • [Journal-full-title] The Medical journal of Malaysia
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Med. J. Malaysia
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] Malaysia
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4. Bazhenov AG, Guseĭnov KD, Khadzhimba AV, Baranov SB, Il'iashenko SA, Maksimov SIa: [Results of treatment for recurrent cancer of the uterine cervix]. Vopr Onkol; 2009;55(3):319-26
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  • The investigation involved 285 patients suffering from recurrences and distant metastases of uterine carcinoma cases of 24% of all (primary tumor).
  • Local recurrence rate for primary squamous cell tumor was 53.6%, adenocarcinoma - 6.3% and poorly-differentiated cell carcinoma - 4.9%.
  • [MeSH-major] Carcinoma / secondary. Carcinoma / therapy. Neoplasm Recurrence, Local / therapy. Uterine Cervical Neoplasms / pathology. Uterine Cervical Neoplasms / therapy
  • [MeSH-minor] Adenocarcinoma / secondary. Adenocarcinoma / therapy. Adult. Carcinoma, Squamous Cell / secondary. Carcinoma, Squamous Cell / therapy. Chemotherapy, Adjuvant. Female. Humans. Intestinal Neoplasms / secondary. Intestinal Neoplasms / therapy. Lymphatic Metastasis. Middle Aged. Neoplasm Invasiveness. Radiotherapy, Adjuvant. Retrospective Studies. Treatment Outcome. Urologic Neoplasms / secondary. Urologic Neoplasms / therapy


5. Jiang Y, Chen Y, Gao L, Ye Q, Alonso MA: [Expression pattern of MAL in normal epithelial cells, benign tumor, and squamous cell carcinoma of larynx]. Lin Chung Er Bi Yan Hou Tou Jing Wai Ke Za Zhi; 2009 May;23(10):451-3
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  • [Title] [Expression pattern of MAL in normal epithelial cells, benign tumor, and squamous cell carcinoma of larynx].
  • METHOD: Use the immunohistochemical technique to analyze the distribution of MAL in normal laryngeal epithelial cells, polyp of vocal cords, laryngeal atypical hyperplasia and laryngeal squamous cell carcinoma.
  • Comparatively, MAL expression is significantly down regulated in laryngeal atypical hyperplasia and laryngeal squamous cell carcinomas (P < 0.05).
  • MAL, therefore, is a potential marker for early diagnosis of laryngeal squamous cell carcinoma.
  • [MeSH-major] Carcinoma, Squamous Cell / metabolism. Laryngeal Mucosa / metabolism. Laryngeal Neoplasms / metabolism. Membrane Transport Proteins / metabolism. Myelin Proteins / metabolism. Proteolipids / metabolism

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  • (PMID = 19670627.001).
  • [ISSN] 1001-1781
  • [Journal-full-title] Lin chuang er bi yan hou tou jing wai ke za zhi = Journal of clinical otorhinolaryngology, head, and neck surgery
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Lin Chung Er Bi Yan Hou Tou Jing Wai Ke Za Zhi
  • [Language] chi
  • [Publication-type] English Abstract; Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] China
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / MAL protein, human; 0 / Membrane Transport Proteins; 0 / Myelin Proteins; 0 / Myelin and Lymphocyte-Associated Proteolipid Proteins; 0 / Proteolipids
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6. Son KD, Kim TJ, Lee YS, Park GS, Han KT, Lim JS, Kang CS: Comparative analysis of immunohistochemical markers with invasiveness and histologic differentiation in squamous cell carcinoma and basal cell carcinoma of the skin. J Surg Oncol; 2008 Jun 1;97(7):615-20
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  • [Title] Comparative analysis of immunohistochemical markers with invasiveness and histologic differentiation in squamous cell carcinoma and basal cell carcinoma of the skin.
  • BACKGROUND: This study evaluates several tumor-related markers to examine the expression pattern of markers according to the invasiveness and histopathologic differentiation of squamous cell carcinoma and basal cell carcinoma.
  • METHODS: Ninety-four cases of squamous cell carcinoma and 108 cases of basal cell carcinoma using tissue array in order to determine correlations between the expression of Ki-67, p53, EGFR, CD44v6, MMP-1 and MMP-3, invasiveness and histologic differentiation.
  • RESULTS: The depth of invasion showed a correlation with CD44v6 expression of tumor cell in both squamous cell carcinoma and basal cell carcinoma (P = 0.009, P = 0.036, respectively) and with the MMP-1 expression of stromal cell in squamous cell carcinoma (P = 0.010).
  • The differentiation of squamous cell carcinoma was correlated with Ki-67 index.
  • The loss of palisading arrangement in basal cell carcinoma was correlated with the MMP-1 expression of stromal cells (P = 0.045).
  • CONCLUSIONS: CD44v6 and MMP-1, expressed in tumor cells and stromal cells respectively, are significant markers associated with the invasiveness of tumors in squamous cell carcinoma and basal cell carcinoma of the skin and that it will be helpful to evaluate the invasiveness by measuring the expression of these markers.
  • [MeSH-major] Biomarkers, Tumor / biosynthesis. Carcinoma, Basal Cell / pathology. Carcinoma, Squamous Cell / pathology. Skin Neoplasms / pathology
  • [MeSH-minor] Adult. Aged. Aged, 80 and over. Antigens, CD44 / biosynthesis. Female. Genes, erbB-1. Humans. Immunohistochemistry. Ki-67 Antigen / biosynthesis. Male. Matrix Metalloproteinase 1 / biosynthesis. Matrix Metalloproteinase 3 / biosynthesis. Middle Aged. Neoplasm Invasiveness. Tumor Suppressor Protein p53 / biosynthesis


7. Lago-Méndez L, Blanco-Carrión A, Diniz-Freitas M, Gándara-Vila P, García-García A, Gándara-Rey JM: Rhomboid glossitis in atypical location: case report and differential diagnosis. Med Oral Patol Oral Cir Bucal; 2005 Mar-Apr;10(2):123-7
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  • Median rhomboid glossitis (MRG) is an uncommon benign abnormality of the tongue, most frequently affecting men.
  • This paper reports a case of rhomboid glossitis in a 61-year-old man who consulted for a painless raised lesion on the dorsum of the tongue, in left paramedial (not medial) location.
  • Other diagnoses considered but ruled out on the basis of the clinical and histopathological findings were haemangioma, pyogenic granuloma, amyloidosis, granular cell tumour, and squamous cell carcinoma.
  • [MeSH-minor] Amyloidosis / diagnosis. Antifungal Agents / therapeutic use. Candida albicans / isolation & purification. Candidiasis, Oral / diagnosis. Diagnosis, Differential. Granular Cell Tumor / diagnosis. Granuloma, Pyogenic / diagnosis. Hemangioma / diagnosis. Humans. Male. Middle Aged. Tongue Neoplasms / diagnosis

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  • (PMID = 15735544.001).
  • [ISSN] 1698-6946
  • [Journal-full-title] Medicina oral, patología oral y cirugía bucal
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Med Oral Patol Oral Cir Bucal
  • [Language] eng; spa
  • [Publication-type] Case Reports; Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] Spain
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Antifungal Agents
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8. Nonaka K, Arai S, Ishikawa K, Nakao M, Nakai Y, Togawa O, Nagata K, Shimizu M, Sasaki Y, Kita H: Short term results of endoscopic submucosal dissection in superficial esophageal squamous cell neoplasms. World J Gastrointest Endosc; 2010 Feb 16;2(2):69-74
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  • [Title] Short term results of endoscopic submucosal dissection in superficial esophageal squamous cell neoplasms.
  • AIM: To evaluate the efficacy of endoscopic submucosal dissection for superficial esophageal squamous cell neoplasms.
  • METHODS: Between July 2007 and March 2009, 27 consecutive superficial esophageal squamous cell neoplasms in 25 enrolled patients were treated by endoscopic submucosal dissection.
  • The en block resection rate was 100% (27/27), and en block resection with tumor-free lateral/basal margins was 88.9% (24/27).
  • CONCLUSION: Endoscopic submucosal dissection is applicable to superficial esophageal squamous cell neoplasms with promising results.

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  • (PMID = 21160693.001).
  • [ISSN] 1948-5190
  • [Journal-full-title] World journal of gastrointestinal endoscopy
  • [ISO-abbreviation] World J Gastrointest Endosc
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] China
  • [Other-IDs] NLM/ PMC2999061
  • [Keywords] NOTNLM ; Endoscopic submucosal dissection / Endoscopy / Esophageal cancer / Neoplasm / Squamous cell
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9. Awasthi A, Gupta N, Srinivasan R, Nijhawan R, Rajwanshi A: Cytopathological spectrum of unusual malignant pleural effusions at a tertiary care centre in north India. Cytopathology; 2007 Feb;18(1):28-32
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  • RESULTS: The 38 unusual malignancies metastasizing to the pleural cavity included 29 haematological malignancies (non-Hodgkin's lymphoma, acute lymphoid leukaemia, multiple myeloma and chronic myeloid leukaemia) and nine non-haematological malignancies (Ewing's sarcoma, neuroblastoma, Wilms' tumour, squamous cell carcinoma, small-cell carcinoma and malignant fibrous histiocytoma).
  • [MeSH-major] Neoplasms / pathology. Pleural Effusion, Malignant / pathology

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  • (PMID = 17250600.001).
  • [ISSN] 0956-5507
  • [Journal-full-title] Cytopathology : official journal of the British Society for Clinical Cytology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Cytopathology
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] England
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10. Hong JH, Yang YM, Kim HS, Lee SI, Muallem S, Shin DM: Markers of squamous cell carcinoma in sarco/endoplasmic reticulum Ca2+ ATPase 2 heterozygote mice keratinocytes. Prog Biophys Mol Biol; 2010 Sep;103(1):81-7
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  • [Title] Markers of squamous cell carcinoma in sarco/endoplasmic reticulum Ca2+ ATPase 2 heterozygote mice keratinocytes.
  • A mutation of Atp2a2 gene encoding the sarco/endoplasmic reticulum Ca(2+)-ATPase 2 (SERCA2) causes Darier's disease in human and null mutation in one copy of Atp2a2 leads to a high incidence of squamous cell tumor in a mouse model.
  • In SERCA2 heterozygote (SERCA2(+/-)) mice keratinocytes, mechanisms involved in partial depletion of SERCA2 gene and its related tumor induction have not been studied.
  • Using the gene fishing system, we first found in SERCA2(+/-) keratinocytes that gene level of tumor-associated calcium signal transducer 1, crystalline alphaB, procollagen XVIII alpha1, and nuclear factor I-B were increased.
  • These results suggest that the alterations of Ca(2+) signaling by SERCA2 haploinsufficiency alternate the gene expression of tumor induction and differentiation in keratinocytes.
  • [MeSH-major] Carcinoma, Squamous Cell / metabolism. Heterozygote. Keratinocytes / metabolism. Sarcoplasmic Reticulum Calcium-Transporting ATPases / genetics. Sarcoplasmic Reticulum Calcium-Transporting ATPases / metabolism

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  • [Copyright] Crown Copyright 2009. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.
  • (PMID = 19840814.001).
  • [ISSN] 1873-1732
  • [Journal-full-title] Progress in biophysics and molecular biology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Prog. Biophys. Mol. Biol.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't; Review
  • [Publication-country] England
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Biomarkers; EC 3.6.3.8 / Sarcoplasmic Reticulum Calcium-Transporting ATPases
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11. Liu L Jr, Huang Y, Guo J, Wang ZH, Song DG: Correlation between FDG PET/CT and the expression of Ki-67, MMP-2, micro-vessel density (MVD), and pathological grading in squamous cell carcinoma of the esophagus. J Clin Oncol; 2009 May 20;27(15_suppl):e15556
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  • [Title] Correlation between FDG PET/CT and the expression of Ki-67, MMP-2, micro-vessel density (MVD), and pathological grading in squamous cell carcinoma of the esophagus.
  • : e15556 Background: Variable uptake of 18FDG has been noticed in positron emission tomography (PET) studies of patients with esophageal squamous cell carcinoma (ESCC).
  • The aim of the present study was to determine if <sup>18</sup>F-FDG PET/CT standardized uptake value (SUV) could quantitatively reflect tumor proliferation, invasion and angiogenesis, and to reveal the relationship between SUV and pathological grading of ESCC.
  • 18FDG uptake was semiquantitatively measured by SUV.Tumour sections were HE stained to determine the pathological grading,and were stained by immunohistochemistry for proliferation marker (Ki67), invasion marker (MMP-2), and angiogenic marker (CD34).
  • RESULTS: Among all the 47 cases,there were 13 well- differentiated squamous cell tumors, 16 moderately differentiated tumors and 18 poorly differentiated tumors,45 of 47 tumors revealed FDG. accumulation in primary tumor foci confirmed by subsequently histopathologically.
  • The mean FDG SUVmax value was 12.504 ± 6.805.
  • The SUV and Ki-67 index, MMP-2 index were positively correlated (r=0.581,0.594), and it was not correlated with MVD(P>0.05).
  • The mean SUV of well-differentiated, moderately differentiated and poorly differentiated tumors were 9.787±1.477, 12.313±0.479, 15.053±2.147 respectively, and a significant difference could be determined between them by statistical analysis(P=0.000).
  • SUV could reflect proliferation and invasion potential of tumor.
  • However, there is no significant correlation between SUV and MVD, thus it could not reflect tumor angiogenesis in ESCC.

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  • (PMID = 27962337.001).
  • [ISSN] 1527-7755
  • [Journal-full-title] Journal of clinical oncology : official journal of the American Society of Clinical Oncology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] J. Clin. Oncol.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] United States
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12. Gualberto A, Dolled-Filhart MP, Hixon ML, Christensen J, Rimm DL, Lee AV, Wang Y, Pollak M, Paz-Ares LG, Karp DD: Molecular bases for sensitivity to figitumumab (CP-751,871) in NSCLC. J Clin Oncol; 2009 May 20;27(15_suppl):8091
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  • : 8091 Background: Signaling of Insulin like Growth Factors (IGFs) through the IGF type 1 receptor (IGF-IR) induces tumor resistance to cancer therapy.
  • Figitumumab (F) (CP-751,871), a specific IGF-IR inhibitor, has shown phase 2 activity in NSCLC in some histologies (i.e., squamous cell and adenocarcinoma) but not others (i.e, large cell or NOS tumors).
  • Gene expression profiling was conducted in 35 NSCLC cell lines treated with F.
  • RESULTS: Squamous NSCLC had the highest IGF-IR expression (p=0.057).
  • This subset included 73% of the squamous cell tumors investigated (N=44).
  • Plasma levels of free IGF-1 (fIGF-1) were low and not predictive of response in squamous cell.
  • Large cell/NOS NSCLC expressed the highest levels of vimentin (p<0.001) but had low E-cadherin and IGF-IR expression and low fIGF-1 plasma levels.
  • Analysis of anchorage independent growth in NSCLC cell lines confirmed that F activity is independently associated to IGF-IR overexpression (p=0.02) and IGFBP3 under-expression (p=0.009).
  • CONCLUSIONS: IGF-IR overexpression and increased free IGFs/low IGFBP are key independent mechanisms of sensitivity to F in NSCLC of squamous and adenocarcinoma cell histologies.

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  • (PMID = 27962669.001).
  • [ISSN] 1527-7755
  • [Journal-full-title] Journal of clinical oncology : official journal of the American Society of Clinical Oncology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] J. Clin. Oncol.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] United States
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13. Shah S, Shukla K, Patel P: Role of fine needle aspiration cytology in diagnosis of lung tumours--a study of 100 cases. Indian J Pathol Microbiol; 2007 Jan;50(1):56-8
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  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • The aim of this study was to assess the usefulness of fine needle aspiration cytology (FNAC) as a diagnostic method in lung tumour as well as to determine the incidence of lung cancer in various age and sex group and in relation with smoking.
  • The most common tumour was squamous cell carcinoma (45%) followed by adenocarcinoma (22%), small cell carcinoma (16%) and large cell carcinoma (8%).
  • [MeSH-major] Biopsy, Fine-Needle. Lung Neoplasms / diagnosis
  • [MeSH-minor] Adenocarcinoma / diagnosis. Adenocarcinoma / epidemiology. Adult. Age Factors. Aged. Aged, 80 and over. Carcinoma, Large Cell / diagnosis. Carcinoma, Large Cell / epidemiology. Carcinoma, Small Cell / diagnosis. Carcinoma, Small Cell / epidemiology. Carcinoma, Squamous Cell / diagnosis. Carcinoma, Squamous Cell / epidemiology. Cytodiagnosis. Female. Histocytochemistry. Humans. Male. Middle Aged. Predictive Value of Tests. Risk Factors. Smoking

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  • (PMID = 17474260.001).
  • [ISSN] 0377-4929
  • [Journal-full-title] Indian journal of pathology & microbiology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Indian J Pathol Microbiol
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] India
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14. Kitcher E, Yarney J, Gyasi R, Cheyuo C: Laryngeal cancer at the korle bu teaching hospital accra ghana. Ghana Med J; 2006 Jun;40(2):45-9
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  • The aim of this study was to determine the number of cases of laryngeal cancer seen at the Korle Bu Teaching Hospital, establish epidemiological parameters of the disease and to outline preventive measures.
  • METHOD: One hundred and fifteen (115) patients who were managed for laryngeal cancer from 1(st) January 1998 to 31(st) December 2003 were studied retrospectively with respect to age, sex, duration of symptoms at presentation, risk factors, symptoms complex, histopathology, stage of tumor, details of treatment offered and follow up.
  • A significant proportion of cases (37.3%) presented with locally advanced disease.
  • The commonest histological type of laryngeal tumour seen was squamous cell carcinoma.
  • Only 58 (69.9%) patients completed radiotherapy treatment and in all 32 (24.3 %) patients did not report for any treatment.
  • CONCLUSIONS: We conclude that significant number of patients with laryngeal cancer presented with locally advanced disease and dysphonia was the commonest symptom.

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  • [Cites] Laryngoscope. 1975 Jul;85(7):1190-6 [1152568.001]
  • [Cites] Int J Radiat Oncol Biol Phys. 1991 Jan;20(1):21-8 [1993628.001]
  • [Cites] Am J Surg. 1991 Oct;162(4):337-40 [1951884.001]
  • (PMID = 17299565.001).
  • [ISSN] 0016-9560
  • [Journal-full-title] Ghana medical journal
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Ghana Med J
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] Ghana
  • [Other-IDs] NLM/ PMC1790844
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15. Doi AM, Hailey JR, Hejtmancik M, Toft JD 2nd, Vallant M, Chhabra RS: Topical application of representative multifunctional acrylates produced proliferative and inflammatory lesions in F344/N rats and B6C3F1 mice, and squamous cell neoplasms in Tg.AC mice. Toxicol Pathol; 2005;33(6):631-40
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  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] Topical application of representative multifunctional acrylates produced proliferative and inflammatory lesions in F344/N rats and B6C3F1 mice, and squamous cell neoplasms in Tg.AC mice.
  • Topical application of TMPTA and PETA to Tg.AC mice showed dose-dependent increases in squamous cell papillomas at the site of application, with decreases in the latency of their appearance in mice receiving 3 mg/kg or greater.
  • Papillomas, the reporter phenotype in Tg.AC mice, were accompanied by a few squamous cell carcinomas, along with hyperplastic and inflammatory lesions.
  • [MeSH-major] Acrylates / toxicity. Papilloma / chemically induced. Precancerous Conditions / chemically induced. Propylene Glycols / toxicity. Skin Neoplasms / chemically induced. Stomach Neoplasms / chemically induced


16. Hamadah I, Binamer Y, Alajlan S, Nassar A, Saleh AJ: Squamous cell carcinoma of the lip after allogeneic hemopoietic stem cell transplantation. Hematol Oncol Stem Cell Ther; 2010;3(2):84-8
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  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] Squamous cell carcinoma of the lip after allogeneic hemopoietic stem cell transplantation.
  • Allogeneic hemopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT) has been considered a curative treatment option for many hematological and non-hematological disorders.
  • Despite the use of advanced methods of tissue typing and new therapies, graft versus host disease (GVHD) remains a major obstacle.
  • Secondary malignancies are also among the most serious long-term complications after HSCT including leukemia, lymphomas, and to a lesser extent, solid tumors.
  • The most commonly observed solid tumor is squamous cell carcinoma (SCC).
  • [MeSH-major] Carcinoma, Squamous Cell / pathology. Carcinoma, Squamous Cell / surgery. Hematopoietic Stem Cell Transplantation. Lip Neoplasms / pathology. Lip Neoplasms / surgery. Neoplasms, Second Primary / pathology. Neoplasms, Second Primary / surgery
  • [MeSH-minor] Adult. Graft vs Host Disease / pathology. Graft vs Host Disease / surgery. Humans. Leukemia, Myelogenous, Chronic, BCR-ABL Positive / pathology. Leukemia, Myelogenous, Chronic, BCR-ABL Positive / therapy. Male. Multiple Myeloma / pathology. Multiple Myeloma / therapy. Transplantation, Homologous


17. Ruan BF, Huang XF, Ding H, Xu C, Ge HM, Zhu HL, Tan RX: Synthesis and cytotoxic evaluation of a series of resveratrol derivatives. Chem Biodivers; 2006 Sep;3(9):975-81
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  • The cytotoxic activities of these compounds were evaluated against human nasopharyngeal epidermoid tumor cell line KB, and compounds 1 and 8-11 showed strong anticancer activities in vitro, comparable with that of 5-fluorouracil, an anticancer drug.
  • [MeSH-minor] Antineoplastic Agents, Phytogenic / chemical synthesis. Antineoplastic Agents, Phytogenic / chemistry. Antineoplastic Agents, Phytogenic / pharmacology. Cell Survival / drug effects. Drug Screening Assays, Antitumor. Humans. KB Cells. Molecular Structure. Stereoisomerism. Structure-Activity Relationship

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  • (PMID = 17193329.001).
  • [ISSN] 1612-1880
  • [Journal-full-title] Chemistry & biodiversity
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Chem. Biodivers.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
  • [Publication-country] Switzerland
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Antineoplastic Agents, Phytogenic; 0 / Stilbenes; Q369O8926L / resveratrol
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18. Yokoyama A, Omori T, Yokoyama T, Tanaka Y, Mizukami T, Matsushita S, Higuchi S, Takahashi H, Maruyama K, Ishii H, Hibi T: Esophageal melanosis, an endoscopic finding associated with squamous cell neoplasms of the upper aerodigestive tract, and inactive aldehyde dehydrogenase-2 in alcoholic Japanese men. J Gastroenterol; 2005 Jul;40(7):676-84
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  • [Title] Esophageal melanosis, an endoscopic finding associated with squamous cell neoplasms of the upper aerodigestive tract, and inactive aldehyde dehydrogenase-2 in alcoholic Japanese men.
  • BACKGROUND: Esophageal melanosis is often observed in alcoholic Japanese men, in whom the prevalence of squamous cell dysplasia and carcinoma (SCC) in the upper aerodigestive tract are high.
  • This study evaluated the associations of esophageal melanosis with these neoplasms, and the factors contributing to the development of esophageal melanosis in this population.
  • [MeSH-major] Alcoholism / complications. Aldehyde Dehydrogenase / metabolism. Carcinoma, Squamous Cell / diagnosis. Esophageal Neoplasms / diagnosis. Melanosis / pathology. Precancerous Conditions / pathology
  • [MeSH-minor] Adult. Age Distribution. Aged. Biomarkers, Tumor / analysis. Biomarkers, Tumor / metabolism. Biopsy, Needle. Confidence Intervals. Digestive System Neoplasms / diagnosis. Digestive System Neoplasms / epidemiology. Esophagoscopy / methods. Genotype. Humans. Immunohistochemistry. Incidence. Japan / epidemiology. Male. Mass Screening / methods. Middle Aged. Odds Ratio. Risk Assessment. Survival Analysis

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  • (PMID = 16082583.001).
  • [ISSN] 0944-1174
  • [Journal-full-title] Journal of gastroenterology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] J. Gastroenterol.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Comparative Study; Journal Article; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
  • [Publication-country] Japan
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Biomarkers, Tumor; EC 1.2.1.3 / ALDH2 protein, human; EC 1.2.1.3 / Aldehyde Dehydrogenase
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19. Wyatt RM, Jones BJ, Dale RG: Radiotherapy treatment delays and their influence on tumour control achieved by various fractionation schedules. Br J Radiol; 2008 Jul;81(967):549-63
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  • [Title] Radiotherapy treatment delays and their influence on tumour control achieved by various fractionation schedules.
  • There is often a considerable delay from initial tumour diagnosis to the start of radiotherapy treatment.
  • This paper extends the calculations of a previous paper on the effects of delays before the initiation of radiotherapy treatment to include results from a variety of practical fractionation regimes for three different types of tumour: squamous cell carcinoma (head and neck), breast and prostate.
  • The linear quadratic model of radiation effect, logarithmic tumour growth (coupled with delay times where relevant) and the Poisson model for tumour control probability (TCP) are used to calculate the change in TCP for delays between diagnosis and treatment.
  • The results show that delays in the start of radiotherapy treatment do have an adverse effect on tumour control for fast-growing tumours.
  • For example, calculations predict a reduction in local tumour control of up to 1.5% per week's delay for head and neck cancers treated following surgery.
  • In addition, there may be a variety of fractionation regimes that will yield very similar clinical results for each tumour type.
  • It is shown theoretically that, for the tumour types considered here, it is possible to increase the dose per fraction and decrease the number of fractions while maintaining or increasing TCP relative to standard 2 Gy fractionation regimes, although there may be some advantage to using hyperfractionated regimes for head and neck cancers in order to reduce normal tissue effects.
  • [MeSH-major] Breast Neoplasms / radiotherapy. Head and Neck Neoplasms / radiotherapy. Prostatic Neoplasms / radiotherapy


20. Puizina-Ivić N, Sapunar D, Marasović D, Mirić L: An overview of Bcl-2 expression in histopathological variants of basal cell carcinoma, squamous cell carcinoma, actinic keratosis and seborrheic keratosis. Coll Antropol; 2008 Oct;32 Suppl 2:61-5
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  • [Title] An overview of Bcl-2 expression in histopathological variants of basal cell carcinoma, squamous cell carcinoma, actinic keratosis and seborrheic keratosis.
  • The Bcl-2 protein has been shown to suppress cell death and protects cell against apoptosis induced by different death-inducing signals.
  • In this study the authors have analyzed imunohistochemically the expression of Bcl-2 protein in the histopathological variants of the most common malignant tumors of the skin--basal cell carcinoma (BCC) and squamous cell tumor (SCC), as well as in the precancerous lesion actinic keratosis (AK) and in benign tumor seborrheic keratosis (SK).
  • Bcl-2 expression in solid, adenoid and cystic variants of BCC exhibited immunoreactivity of tumor stroma with more intense staining among peripheral palisading cells.
  • Among SCC in all samples, tumor tissue lack to express Bcl-2 positivity.
  • In cases of hypertrophic and atrophic variants of AK, Bcl-2 expression was confined to basal cell layer, as well as in one case of hypertrophic variant in suprabasal cells.
  • In three histological variants of SK expresseion of Bcl-2 protein was in areas of basaloid proliferation, while in areas of squamous differentiation was negative.
  • In clonal variant immunostaining was positive among cells in characteristic "nests" Distribution of Bcl-2 protein expression in solid, adenoid and cystic variant of BCC showed that peripheral proliferating cells are protected against apoptosis what permits tumor growth.
  • In morpheaform variant reduced amount of Bcl-2 expression indicated that this variant of BCC has increased cell proliferation, and in practice shows tendency for recurrence and difficulties to eradicate.
  • Bcl-2 expression supports the observation that tumor cells are derived from basal keratinocytes.
  • In SCC, lack of Bcl-2 expression indicates that origin of tumor cells is from more differentiated suprabasal keratinocytes.
  • In AK results suggest that immunoreactivity is regulated with respect of the keratinocyte's differentiation status, but not closely correlate with proliferative rate.
  • [MeSH-major] Carcinoma, Basal Cell / metabolism. Carcinoma, Squamous Cell / metabolism. Keratosis, Actinic / metabolism. Keratosis, Seborrheic / metabolism. Proto-Oncogene Proteins c-bcl-2 / metabolism. Skin Neoplasms / metabolism


21. Au JT, Sugiyama G, Wang H, Nicastri A, Lee D, Ko W, Tak V: Carcinosarcoma of the oesophagus - a rare mixed type of tumor. J Surg Case Rep; 2010;2010(7):7
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  • [Title] Carcinosarcoma of the oesophagus - a rare mixed type of tumor.
  • Oesophageal carcinosarcoma is a rare type of oesophageal cancer composed of both squamous cells and sarcomatous cells.
  • On surgical pathology, it was discovered that the tumor had both squamous cell and sarcomatous cell components, and the final diagnosis was changed to oesophageal carcinosarcoma.

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  • [Copyright] © JSCR.
  • (PMID = 24946341.001).
  • [ISSN] 2042-8812
  • [Journal-full-title] Journal of surgical case reports
  • [ISO-abbreviation] J Surg Case Rep
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] England
  • [Other-IDs] NLM/ PMC3649142
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22. Huang SF, Chuang WY, Cheng SD, Hsin LJ, Lee LY, Kao HK: A colliding maxillary sinus cancer of adenosquamous carcinoma and small cell neuroendocrine carcinoma--a case report with EGFR copy number analysis. World J Surg Oncol; 2010;8:92
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  • [Title] A colliding maxillary sinus cancer of adenosquamous carcinoma and small cell neuroendocrine carcinoma--a case report with EGFR copy number analysis.
  • BACKGROUND: Small cell neuroendocrine carcinoma (SNEC) of maxillary sinus is a rare and aggressive malignancy.
  • A tumor with squamous cell carcinoma, adenocarcinoma and SNEC co-existence is extremely rare.
  • CASE PRESENTATION: We present a colliding tumor of squamous cell, adenocarcinoma and SNEC in maxillary sinus.
  • Magnetic resonance imaging showed a tumor involving left maxilla and orbital floor.
  • Excision of tumor was done and the defect was reconstructed with free flap.
  • The pathology revealed a malignant tumor composed of squamous cell carcinoma, adenocarcinoma and SNEC components.
  • EGFR FISH study showed no gene amplification in 3 components of this tumor.
  • The tumor progressed rapidly and the patient expired at 8 months after surgery.
  • CONCLUSION: A colliding tumor of squamous cell, adenocarcinoma and neuroendocrine carcinoma in maxillary sinus was aggressive in behavior and the treatment response was poor due to the complexity of tumor.
  • [MeSH-major] Carcinoma, Neuroendocrine / genetics. Carcinoma, Small Cell / genetics. DNA, Neoplasm / genetics. Maxillary Sinus Neoplasms / genetics. Receptor, Epidermal Growth Factor / genetics

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  • [Cites] Ann Otol Rhinol Laryngol. 2001 Jan;110(1):76-82 [11201814.001]
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  • (PMID = 20961443.001).
  • [ISSN] 1477-7819
  • [Journal-full-title] World journal of surgical oncology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] World J Surg Oncol
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Case Reports; Journal Article; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
  • [Publication-country] England
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / DNA, Neoplasm; EC 2.7.10.1 / Receptor, Epidermal Growth Factor
  • [Other-IDs] NLM/ PMC2984401
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23. Ono S, Fujishiro M, Niimi K, Goto O, Kodashima S, Yamamichi N, Omata M: Predictors of postoperative stricture after esophageal endoscopic submucosal dissection for superficial squamous cell neoplasms. Endoscopy; 2009 Aug;41(8):661-5
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  • [Title] Predictors of postoperative stricture after esophageal endoscopic submucosal dissection for superficial squamous cell neoplasms.
  • BACKGROUND AND STUDY AIMS: Although endoscopic submucosal dissection (ESD) is becoming accepted as an established treatment for superficial esophageal squamous cell neoplasms, the risks for developing postoperative stricture have not been elucidated.
  • From January 2002 to October 2008, 65 patients with high-grade intraepithelial neoplasms (HGINs) or m2 carcinomas treated by ESD were enrolled.
  • Predictors of postoperative stricture were investigated by comparing results from 11 patients who developed strictures with those from 54 patients who did not.
  • [MeSH-major] Esophageal Neoplasms / surgery. Esophageal Stenosis / etiology. Esophagoscopy. Mucous Membrane / surgery. Neoplasms, Squamous Cell / surgery. Postoperative Complications

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  • [CommentIn] Endoscopy. 2009 Aug;41(8):712-4 [19670140.001]
  • (PMID = 19565442.001).
  • [ISSN] 1438-8812
  • [Journal-full-title] Endoscopy
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Endoscopy
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] Germany
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24. Jacob S, Mohapatra D: Placental site nodule: a tumor-like trophoblastic lesion. Indian J Pathol Microbiol; 2009 Apr-Jun;52(2):240-1
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  • [Title] Placental site nodule: a tumor-like trophoblastic lesion.
  • This entity may have bizarre histologic findings and should be distinguished from other aggressive lesions like placental site trophoblastic tumor, epithelioid trophoblastic tumor and squamous cell carcinoma.
  • [MeSH-major] Gestational Trophoblastic Disease / diagnosis. Placenta Diseases / pathology. Trophoblasts / pathology

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  • (PMID = 19332926.001).
  • [ISSN] 0974-5130
  • [Journal-full-title] Indian journal of pathology & microbiology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Indian J Pathol Microbiol
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Case Reports; Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] India
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25. Yilmaz A, Savaş I, Dizbay Sak S, Güngör A, Kaya A, Serinsöz E, Savaş B: Distribution of Bcl-2 gene expression and its prognostic value in non-small cell lung cancer. Tuberk Toraks; 2005;53(4):323-9
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  • [Title] Distribution of Bcl-2 gene expression and its prognostic value in non-small cell lung cancer.
  • The aim of this study was to determine the expression of Bcl-2 gene and prognostic importance of Bcl-2 expression in paraffin embedded blocks of patients diagnosed with non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC).
  • These sections are transferred on to slides covered with poly-L-lysine, then de-paraffinization was made.
  • Positive staining was observed in 9 (19.6%) patients, but not in 37 (80.4%) patients.
  • Out of 32 cases with squamous cell tumor, 8 (25%) were observed to have positive staining in their sections, but 24 (75%) were not so.
  • No staining was observed in 11 cases whose cell type was adenoma and two cases whose cell type was adenosquamos (100%).
  • Staining was present in the section of one case with large cell (100%).
  • Median survival time was 36.6 months in cases in which staining was observed and 6.10 months in cases in which staining was not observed, with a significant difference (p< 0.05).
  • [MeSH-major] Carcinoma, Non-Small-Cell Lung / genetics. Gene Expression Regulation, Neoplastic. Genes, bcl-2. Lung Neoplasms / genetics. Proto-Oncogene Proteins c-bcl-2 / biosynthesis
  • [MeSH-minor] Adenocarcinoma / genetics. Adenocarcinoma / metabolism. Adenocarcinoma / mortality. Adenocarcinoma / pathology. Adult. Aged. Biomarkers, Tumor / metabolism. Female. Humans. Immunohistochemistry. Male. Middle Aged. Prognosis. Retrospective Studies. Survival Rate


26. Zhang LN, Xiao ZP, Ding H, Ge HM, Xu C, Zhu HL, Tan RX: Synthesis and cytotoxic evaluation of novel 7-O-modified genistein derivatives. Chem Biodivers; 2007 Feb;4(2):248-55
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  • The cytotoxic activities of these compounds were evaluated against human chronic myeloid leukemia cells (K562) and a human nasopharyngeal epidermoid tumor cell line (KB).

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  • (PMID = 17311236.001).
  • [ISSN] 1612-1880
  • [Journal-full-title] Chemistry & biodiversity
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Chem. Biodivers.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
  • [Publication-country] Switzerland
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Antineoplastic Agents; DH2M523P0H / Genistein
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27. Saha A, Kumar K, Choudhuri MK: Computed tomography-guided fine needle aspiration cytology of thoracic mass lesions: A study of 57 cases. J Cytol; 2009 Apr;26(2):55-9
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  • There were 54 parenchymal (lung) tumors and the remaining three tumor cases were mediastinal.
  • The most common tumor was squamous cell carcinoma (42.6%) followed by adenocarcinoma (29.6%) and small cell carcinoma.

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  • (PMID = 21938153.001).
  • [ISSN] 0970-9371
  • [Journal-full-title] Journal of cytology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] J Cytol
  • [Language] ENG
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] India
  • [Other-IDs] NLM/ PMC3168019
  • [Keywords] NOTNLM ; CT guided FNAC / lung / thoracic mass lesions
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28. Créhange G, Bosset M, Lorchel F, Buffet-Miny J, Dumas JL, Mercier M, Puyraveau M, Maingon P, Bosset JF: Tumor volume as outcome determinant in patients treated with chemoradiation for locally advanced esophageal cancer. Am J Clin Oncol; 2006 Dec;29(6):583-7
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  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] Tumor volume as outcome determinant in patients treated with chemoradiation for locally advanced esophageal cancer.
  • OBJECTIVE: The currently used tumor-node metastasis (TNM) staging method is generally not applicable to patients with unresectable esophageal carcinomas.
  • There is a need for both an efficient, easy-to-perform clinical classification and for identification of pretherapeutic prognostic factors that would be useful for oncologists, one of which is tumor volume.
  • Using the computed tomography (CT) scan classification, tumors were recorded as follows: 1 T1, 42 T2, 93 T3, 6 T4, 2 Nx, 72 N0, 74 N1.
  • Tumor volume from the CT scans was determined as the sum of 2 opposed truncated cones.
  • Median tumor volume was 57.5 cm3 (range, 0.6-288 cm3).
  • Prognostic factors identified by univariate analysis were: dysphagia grade > or =2, other histology than squamous cell, tumor location below the carina, age <65 years and tumor volume > or =100 cm3.
  • Prognostic factors identified with multivariate analysis were: dysphagia grade > or =2 (P = 0.013), weight loss > or =10% (P = 0.047), tumor location below the carina (P = 0.002), and tumor volume > or =100 cm3 (P = 0.041).
  • CONCLUSIONS: For patients that the TNM staging system is not applicable, tumor volume is a new powerful determinant of survival.
  • [MeSH-major] Esophageal Neoplasms / pathology. Neoplasm Staging / methods


29. Huang XF, Ruan BF, Wang XT, Xu C, Ge HM, Zhu HL, Tan RX: Synthesis and cytotoxic evaluation of a series of resveratrol derivatives modified in C2 position. Eur J Med Chem; 2007 Feb;42(2):263-7
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  • Eleven C2-substituted derivatives of resveratrol (trans-3,4',5-trihydroxystilbene, RES) were prepared by partial synthesis from RES and evaluated for their cytotoxic activities against a human nasopharyngeal epidermoid tumor cell line KB.

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  • (PMID = 17000031.001).
  • [ISSN] 0223-5234
  • [Journal-full-title] European journal of medicinal chemistry
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Eur J Med Chem
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
  • [Publication-country] France
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Antineoplastic Agents; 0 / Stilbenes; Q369O8926L / resveratrol
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30. Tango Y, Kano R, Maruyama H, Asano K, Tanaka S, Hasegawa A, Kamata H: Detection of autoantibodies against survivin in sera from cancer dogs. J Vet Med Sci; 2010 Jul;72(7):917-20
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  • Survivin overexpression has been reported in relation to tumor malignancy, suggesting that it is an unfavorable prognostic marker, and antibody responses to this protein have been confirmed in human cancer patients.
  • The cut-off value for positivity in the anti-survivin ELISA was 0.35, as determined using the mean absorbance +2 S.D. of samples from healthy dogs.
  • Sera from 16 of 59 (27.1%) cancer and 3 of 25 (12%) non-cancer disease dogs were positive on ELISA.
  • The highest positivity rates (>50%) among the cancer cases were seen in dogs with mammary tumor, squamous cell carcinoma and melanoma.

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  • (PMID = 20179386.001).
  • [ISSN] 0916-7250
  • [Journal-full-title] The Journal of veterinary medical science
  • [ISO-abbreviation] J. Vet. Med. Sci.
  • [Language] ENG
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] Japan
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Autoantibodies; 0 / DNA Primers; 0 / Microtubule-Associated Proteins
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31. Hainsworth JD, Fizazi K: Treatment for patients with unknown primary cancer and favorable prognostic factors. Semin Oncol; 2009 Feb;36(1):44-51
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  • Specific subsets include women with peritoneal carcinomatosis, women with isolated axillary lymph node metastases, adenocarcinoma presenting as a single metastatic lesion, young men with features of extragonadal germ cell tumor, squamous carcinoma involving cervical or inguinal lymph nodes, and neuroendocrine carcinoma.
  • [MeSH-major] Neoplasms, Unknown Primary / therapy
  • [MeSH-minor] Biomarkers, Tumor / analysis. Humans. Prognosis

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  • (PMID = 19179187.001).
  • [ISSN] 0093-7754
  • [Journal-full-title] Seminars in oncology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Semin. Oncol.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't; Review
  • [Publication-country] United States
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Biomarkers, Tumor
  • [Number-of-references] 58
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32. Sahai A, Kodner IJ: Premalignant neoplasms and squamous cell carcinoma of the anal margin. Clin Colon Rectal Surg; 2006 May;19(2):88-93
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  • [Title] Premalignant neoplasms and squamous cell carcinoma of the anal margin.
  • Understanding anal anatomy and performing a biopsy of any suspicious lesions are essential in avoiding a delay in diagnosis and appropriately treating these tumors.
  • Combined multimodality treatment has come to play an important role in managing patient with more advanced or metastatic disease.

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  • (PMID = 20011315.001).
  • [ISSN] 1530-9681
  • [Journal-full-title] Clinics in colon and rectal surgery
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Clin Colon Rectal Surg
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] United States
  • [Other-IDs] NLM/ PMC2780101
  • [Keywords] NOTNLM ; Anus neoplasms / Bowen's disease / Paget's disease / squamous cell cancer
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33. Li HQ, Ge HM, Chen YX, Xu C, Shi L, Ding H, Zhu HL, Tan RX: Synthesis and cytotoxic evaluation of a series of genistein derivatives. Chem Biodivers; 2006 Apr;3(4):463-72
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  • The cytotoxic activities of these compounds were evaluated against a human nasopharyngeal epidermoid tumor cell line KB.
  • [MeSH-minor] Cell Line, Tumor. Drug Screening Assays, Antitumor / methods. Humans

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  • (PMID = 17193282.001).
  • [ISSN] 1612-1880
  • [Journal-full-title] Chemistry & biodiversity
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Chem. Biodivers.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Comparative Study; Journal Article; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
  • [Publication-country] Switzerland
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Cytotoxins; DH2M523P0H / Genistein
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34. Domínguez-Cherit J, Chanussot-Deprez C, Maria-Sarti H, Fonte-Avalos V, Vega-Memije E, Luis-Montoya P: Nail unit tumors: a study of 234 patients in the dermatology department of the "Dr Manuel Gea González" General Hospital in Mexico City. Dermatol Surg; 2008 Oct;34(10):1363-71
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  • [Title] Nail unit tumors: a study of 234 patients in the dermatology department of the "Dr Manuel Gea González" General Hospital in Mexico City.
  • BACKGROUND: The frequency of nail unit tumors is not well known because they are often misdiagnosed, and the clinical appearance of benign and malignant tumors is not characteristic.
  • RESULTS: The tumors most frequently diagnosed were fibrous tumors (29.05%), osteocartilaginous tumors (21.79%), and myxoid pseudocysts (11.96%).
  • Malignant melanoma occupied the fourth place (9.82%), and the second most frequent malignant tumor was squamous cell carcinoma (SCC; 4.70%).
  • Among other tumors were glomus, neurofibromas, giant cell tumors of tendon sheath, and pyogenic granulomas.
  • CONCLUSION: This study in a Mexican population sheds light on the frequency and the alterations produced by nail unit tumors, which we must keep in mind for a more accurate diagnosis.
  • [MeSH-major] Nail Diseases / diagnosis. Skin Neoplasms / diagnosis

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  • (PMID = 18616533.001).
  • [ISSN] 1524-4725
  • [Journal-full-title] Dermatologic surgery : official publication for American Society for Dermatologic Surgery [et al.]
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Dermatol Surg
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] United States
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35. Gołabek W, Drop A, Gołabek E, Morshed K: [Site of origin of paranasal sinus malignancies]. Pol Merkur Lekarski; 2005 Sep;19(111):413-4
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  • The most common malignant tumor was squamous cell carcinoma (41, 1%) and then cancers of salivary origin (20, 2%).
  • Within the maxillary sinus the most frequent neoplasm was cancer whereas in the nasal cavity melanoma and olfactory neuroblastoma.
  • In three (2, 4%) patients site of tumor origin demonstrated on CT was different form that of operative finding.
  • [MeSH-major] Maxillary Sinus Neoplasms / pathology. Nose Neoplasms / pathology. Paranasal Sinus Neoplasms / secondary. Salivary Gland Neoplasms / pathology
  • [MeSH-minor] Adolescent. Adult. Aged. Aged, 80 and over. Carcinoma, Squamous Cell / secondary. Child. Child, Preschool. Esthesioneuroblastoma, Olfactory / secondary. Female. Humans. Male. Melanoma / secondary. Middle Aged. Tomography, X-Ray Computed

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  • (PMID = 16358890.001).
  • [ISSN] 1426-9686
  • [Journal-full-title] Polski merkuriusz lekarski : organ Polskiego Towarzystwa Lekarskiego
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Pol. Merkur. Lekarski
  • [Language] pol
  • [Publication-type] English Abstract; Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] Poland
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36. Shcherbakov AM: [Results of endoscopic recanalization for inoperable cancer of the esophagus]. Vopr Onkol; 2005;51(5):588-91
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  • Patients with inoperable cancer of the esophagus were followed up for 1-3 years after a course of palliative endoscopic destruction of tumor.
  • Among the unfavorable prognostic factors were partial decomposition of tumor, squamous-cell pattern, size of more than 9 cm, circular extension through the esophagus and stage III stenosis.
  • [MeSH-major] Esophageal Neoplasms / surgery. Esophagoscopy. Palliative Care / methods
  • [MeSH-minor] Adult. Aged. Aged, 80 and over. Carcinoma, Squamous Cell / surgery. Follow-Up Studies. Humans. Middle Aged. Risk Factors. Severity of Illness Index. Survival Analysis. Treatment Outcome

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  • (PMID = 16756018.001).
  • [ISSN] 0507-3758
  • [Journal-full-title] Voprosy onkologii
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Vopr Onkol
  • [Language] rus
  • [Publication-type] English Abstract; Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] Russia (Federation)
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37. Bulj TK, Krunic AL, Cetner AS, Villano JL: Refractory aggressive keratoacanthoma centrifugum marginatum of the scalp controlled with the epidermal growth factor receptor inhibitor erlotinib. Br J Dermatol; 2010 Sep;163(3):633-7
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  • Keratoacanthomas are squamous cell neoplasms known to be abundant in epidermal growth factor receptors (EGFRs).
  • [MeSH-major] Head and Neck Neoplasms / drug therapy. Keratoacanthoma / drug therapy. Protein Kinase Inhibitors / therapeutic use. Quinazolines / therapeutic use. Scalp. Skin Neoplasms / drug therapy

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  • [Copyright] © 2010 The Authors. Journal Compilation © 2010 British Association of Dermatologists.
  • (PMID = 20222923.001).
  • [ISSN] 1365-2133
  • [Journal-full-title] The British journal of dermatology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Br. J. Dermatol.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Case Reports; Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] England
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Protein Kinase Inhibitors; 0 / Quinazolines; DA87705X9K / Erlotinib Hydrochloride; EC 2.7.10.1 / Receptor, Epidermal Growth Factor
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38. Kashima K, Iwasaki C, Yahata T, Tanaka K: Preoperative transvaginal ultrasound guided needle biopsy for primary squamous cell carcinoma of the endometrium. J Obstet Gynaecol Res; 2010 Oct;36(5):1108-11
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  • [Title] Preoperative transvaginal ultrasound guided needle biopsy for primary squamous cell carcinoma of the endometrium.
  • Primary squamous cell carcinoma of the endometrium (PSCCE) is an extremely rare tumor and little information is available about its treatment and prognosis.
  • Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) demonstrated a uterine tumor and transvaginal ultrasound guided needle biopsy specimens of the tumor showed squamous cell carcinoma.
  • She remains free of disease at 6 months after CCRT.
  • [MeSH-major] Biopsy, Needle / methods. Carcinoma, Squamous Cell / pathology. Endometrial Neoplasms / pathology. Ultrasonography / methods

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  • (PMID = 21058445.001).
  • [ISSN] 1447-0756
  • [Journal-full-title] The journal of obstetrics and gynaecology research
  • [ISO-abbreviation] J. Obstet. Gynaecol. Res.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Case Reports; Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] Australia
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39. Krahl D, Sellheyer K: Monoclonal antibody Ber-EP4 reliably discriminates between microcystic adnexal carcinoma and basal cell carcinoma. J Cutan Pathol; 2007 Oct;34(10):782-7
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  • [Title] Monoclonal antibody Ber-EP4 reliably discriminates between microcystic adnexal carcinoma and basal cell carcinoma.
  • BACKGROUND: Sclerosing cutaneous neoplasms often represent a diagnostic challenge.
  • It is diagnostically highly reliable in the differentiation between basal cell carcinoma and cutaneous squamous cell carcinoma.
  • In this study, we report its application in the differential diagnosis of microcystic adnexal carcinoma, desmoplastic trichoepithelioma and basal cell carcinoma.
  • METHODS: Biopsy samples from 28 sclerosing and infiltrating basal cell carcinomas, 13 microcystic adnexal carcinomas and 16 desmoplastic trichoepitheliomas were examined after immunohistochemical staining with Ber-EP4.
  • RESULTS: Ber-EP4 did not label any of the microcystic adnexal carcinomas, whereas all 28 basal cell carcinomas were Ber-EP4 positive.
  • Only one basal cell carcinoma was weakly positive.
  • Twelve of the 16 desmoplastic trichoepitheliomas were immunoreactive with Ber-EP4 and the staining was more variable than those of basal cell carcinomas.
  • CONCLUSIONS: Ber-EP4 reliably differentiates microcystic adnexal carcinoma from basal cell carcinoma to the same extent as it distinguishes the latter tumor from squamous cell carcinoma.
  • While it stains the majority of desmoplastic trichoepitheliomas, these tumors still have to be considered in the differential diagnosis with microcystic adnexal carcinoma, when Ber-EP4 is applied.
  • [MeSH-major] Biomarkers, Tumor / metabolism. Carcinoma, Basal Cell / diagnosis. Carcinoma, Skin Appendage / diagnosis. Skin / pathology. Skin Neoplasms / diagnosis
  • [MeSH-minor] Biopsy. Carcinoma, Squamous Cell / diagnosis. Carcinoma, Squamous Cell / metabolism. Diagnosis, Differential. Fluorescent Antibody Technique, Indirect. Humans. Sclerosis / pathology


40. Gerdes MJ, Myakishev M, Frost NA, Rishi V, Moitra J, Acharya A, Levy MR, Park SW, Glick A, Yuspa SH, Vinson C: Activator protein-1 activity regulates epithelial tumor cell identity. Cancer Res; 2006 Aug 1;66(15):7578-88
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  • [Title] Activator protein-1 activity regulates epithelial tumor cell identity.
  • When A-FOS was expressed during chemical-induced skin carcinogenesis, mice do not develop characteristic benign and malignant squamous lesions but instead develop benign sebaceous adenomas containing a signature mutation in the H-ras proto-oncogene.
  • Inhibiting AP-1 activity after tumor formation caused squamous tumors to transdifferentiate into sebaceous tumors.
  • Furthermore, reactivating AP-1 in sebaceous tumors results in a reciprocal transdifferentiation into squamous tumors.
  • In both cases of transdifferentiation, individual cells express molecular markers for both cell types, indicating individual tumor cells have the capacity to express multiple lineages.
  • Molecular characterization of cultured keratinocytes and tumor material indicates that AP-1 regulates the balance between the wnt/beta-catenin and hedgehog signaling pathways that determine squamous and sebaceous lineages, respectively.
  • Thus, AP-1 activity regulates tumor cell lineage and is essential to maintain the squamous tumor cell identity.
  • [MeSH-major] Adenocarcinoma, Sebaceous / metabolism. Carcinoma, Squamous Cell / metabolism. Skin Neoplasms / metabolism. Transcription Factor AP-1 / metabolism
  • [MeSH-minor] Animals. DNA, Neoplasm / metabolism. Hyperplasia. Keratinocytes / metabolism. Mice. Mice, Transgenic. Precancerous Conditions / genetics. Precancerous Conditions / metabolism. Precancerous Conditions / pathology. Promoter Regions, Genetic. Protein Binding. Proto-Oncogene Proteins c-fos / biosynthesis. Proto-Oncogene Proteins c-fos / genetics. Proto-Oncogene Proteins c-jun / metabolism. Sebaceous Glands / pathology. Transcriptional Activation. Wnt Proteins / genetics


41. Watanabe H, Kamiya K: The induction of insulinomas by X-irradiation to the gastric region in Otsuka Long-Evans Tokushima Fatty rats. Oncol Rep; 2008 Apr;19(4):987-91
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  • The X-ray induction of tumors was examined in five-week-old male Otsuka Long-Evans Tokushima Fatty (OLETF) rats, treated with two 10 Gy doses to the gastric region with a 3-day interval (total 20 Gy).
  • The total tumor incidence was 27/30 (87.1%) in the treated rats (islet tumors, gastric tumors, sarcomas, seminomas, adrenal tumors, kidney tumors, papilloma, lymphomas and mammary tumors).
  • Islet tumors, generally showed to be positive for insulin by immunohistochemistry, developed in 19 rats (63.3%), and were associated with low serum glucose.
  • Since spontaneous tumors observed in 6/19 (31.6%) rats (sarcomas, kidney tumors, duodenum tumors, seminoma, adrenal tumor and squamous cell carcinoma) did not include any insulinomas, these are clearly induced by X-irradiation in OLETF rats.
  • [MeSH-major] Insulinoma / etiology. Neoplasms, Radiation-Induced / etiology. Pancreatic Neoplasms / etiology

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  • (PMID = 18357386.001).
  • [ISSN] 1021-335X
  • [Journal-full-title] Oncology reports
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Oncol. Rep.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] Greece
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42. Guimarães Vde C, Viana MA, Barbosa MA, Paiva ML, Tavares JA, Camargo LA: [Vocal care: question of prevention and health]. Cien Saude Colet; 2010 Sep;15(6):2799-803
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  • [Transliterated title] Cuidados vocais: questão de prevenção e saúde.
  • Considering all the patients attended, only one presented malignant neoplasm (squamous cell carcinoma), confirmed later by biopsy.

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  • (PMID = 20922288.001).
  • [ISSN] 1678-4561
  • [Journal-full-title] Ciência & saúde coletiva
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Cien Saude Colet
  • [Language] por
  • [Publication-type] English Abstract; Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] Brazil
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43. Canda AE, Sevinc AI, Kocdor MA, Canda T, Balci P, Saydam S, Harmancioglu O: Metastatic tumors in the breast: a report of 5 cases and review of the literature. Clin Breast Cancer; 2007 Jun;7(8):638-43
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  • [Title] Metastatic tumors in the breast: a report of 5 cases and review of the literature.
  • However, metastases to the breast from nonmammary malignant neoplasms are rare and were detected at a rate of 0.28% in our series.
  • Clinical and pathologic findings in 5 cases of metastatic tumors (malign mesenchymal tumor, squamous cell carcinoma of the tongue, non-Hodgkin lymphoma, and Sézary syndrome) in the breast are presented and discussed with respect to the literature.
  • [MeSH-major] Breast Neoplasms / secondary. Carcinoma, Squamous Cell / secondary. Histiocytoma, Malignant Fibrous / secondary. Lymphoma, Large B-Cell, Diffuse / pathology. Sezary Syndrome / pathology
  • [MeSH-minor] Adult. Aged. Female. Humans. Middle Aged. Skin Neoplasms / pathology

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  • (PMID = 17592678.001).
  • [ISSN] 1526-8209
  • [Journal-full-title] Clinical breast cancer
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Clin. Breast Cancer
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Case Reports; Journal Article; Review
  • [Publication-country] United States
  • [Number-of-references] 25
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44. Hui P, Martel M, Parkash V: Gestational trophoblastic diseases: recent advances in histopathologic diagnosis and related genetic aspects. Adv Anat Pathol; 2005 May;12(3):116-25
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  • Gestational trophoblastic disease refers to a spectrum of proliferative disorders of the placental trophoblast, with a wide range of histologic appearances and clinical behaviors.
  • A discussion of epithelioid trophoblastic tumor, a newly introduced tumor subtype, with its differential diagnosis from placental-site trophoblastic tumor and squamous cell carcinoma is also presented.
  • [MeSH-major] Gestational Trophoblastic Disease / pathology
  • [MeSH-minor] Carcinoma, Squamous Cell / pathology. Choriocarcinoma / pathology. Diagnosis, Differential. Female. Humans. Hydatidiform Mole / pathology. Hydatidiform Mole, Invasive / pathology. Pregnancy. Trophoblastic Tumor, Placental Site / pathology. Uterine Neoplasms / pathology

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  • (PMID = 15900112.001).
  • [ISSN] 1072-4109
  • [Journal-full-title] Advances in anatomic pathology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Adv Anat Pathol
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Review
  • [Publication-country] United States
  • [Number-of-references] 66
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45. Shim YM, Kim HK, Kim K: Comparison of survival and recurrence pattern between two-field and three-field lymph node dissections for upper thoracic esophageal squamous cell carcinoma. J Thorac Oncol; 2010 May;5(5):707-12
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  • [Title] Comparison of survival and recurrence pattern between two-field and three-field lymph node dissections for upper thoracic esophageal squamous cell carcinoma.
  • The objective of this study was to compare survival and recurrence according to the extent of lymph node dissection in patients with upper thoracic esophageal squamous cell cancer.
  • METHODS: Between 1995 and 2007, 91 patients underwent R0 esophagectomy (with no residual tumor) for squamous cell carcinoma of the upper thoracic esophagus at our institution.
  • The disease-free 5-year survival rate was 39% for the 2 FL group and 38% for the 3 FL group (p = 0.97).
  • The overall recurrence rate and the incidence of cervical nodal recurrence were not significantly different between the two groups.
  • CONCLUSIONS: Our findings suggest that there was no survival benefit from the addition of cervical nodal dissection in patients with upper thoracic esophageal squamous cell carcinoma who had no evidence of cervical lymph node metastasis.
  • [MeSH-major] Carcinoma, Squamous Cell / mortality. Esophageal Neoplasms / mortality. Lymph Node Excision / mortality. Neoplasm Recurrence, Local / mortality. Postoperative Complications / mortality
  • [MeSH-minor] Esophagectomy. Female. Follow-Up Studies. Humans. Liver Neoplasms / mortality. Liver Neoplasms / secondary. Liver Neoplasms / surgery. Male. Middle Aged. Neoplasm Staging. Survival Rate. Treatment Outcome


46. Huang XF, Li HQ, Shi L, Xue JY, Ruan BF, Zhu HL: Synthesis of resveratrol analogues, and evaluation of their cytotoxic and xanthine oxidase inhibitory activities. Chem Biodivers; 2008 Apr;5(4):636-42
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  • The synthesized compounds have been evaluated for their cytotoxic activity against a human nasopharyngeal epidermoid tumor cell line KB, as well as for their xanthine oxidase inhibitory activity.
  • Compounds 2, 3, and 6a showed the most significant cytotoxic activities against the cell line KB, and compound 2 also exhibited strong xanthine oxidase inhibitory activity.
  • [MeSH-minor] Antineoplastic Agents / pharmacology. Cell Survival / drug effects. Enzyme Inhibitors / chemical synthesis. Enzyme Inhibitors / pharmacology. Humans. KB Cells / drug effects

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  • (PMID = 18421756.001).
  • [ISSN] 1612-1880
  • [Journal-full-title] Chemistry & biodiversity
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Chem. Biodivers.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
  • [Publication-country] Switzerland
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Antineoplastic Agents; 0 / Enzyme Inhibitors; 0 / Phenols; 0 / Stilbenes; EC 1.17.3.2 / Xanthine Oxidase; Q369O8926L / resveratrol
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47. Okunade GW, Miller ML, Azhar M, Andringa A, Sanford LP, Doetschman T, Prasad V, Shull GE: Loss of the Atp2c1 secretory pathway Ca(2+)-ATPase (SPCA1) in mice causes Golgi stress, apoptosis, and midgestational death in homozygous embryos and squamous cell tumors in adult heterozygotes. J Biol Chem; 2007 Sep 7;282(36):26517-27
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  • [Title] Loss of the Atp2c1 secretory pathway Ca(2+)-ATPase (SPCA1) in mice causes Golgi stress, apoptosis, and midgestational death in homozygous embryos and squamous cell tumors in adult heterozygotes.
  • Loss of one copy of the human ATP2C1 gene, encoding SPCA1 (secretory pathway Ca(2+)-ATPase isoform 1), causes Hailey-Hailey disease, a skin disorder.
  • Breeding of heterozygous mutants yielded a normal Mendelian ratio among embryos on gestation day 9.5; however, null mutant (Spca1(-/-)) embryos exhibited growth retardation and did not survive beyond gestation day 10.5.
  • Coated pits, junctional complexes, desmosomes, and basement membranes appeared normal in mutant embryos, indicating that processing and trafficking of proteins in the secretory pathway was not massively impaired.
  • Adult heterozygous mice appeared normal and exhibited no evidence of Hailey-Hailey disease; however, aged heterozygotes had an increased incidence of squamous cell tumors of keratinized epithelial cells of the skin and esophagus.
  • [MeSH-major] Calcium-Transporting ATPases / deficiency. Carcinoma, Squamous Cell / metabolism. Embryo Loss / metabolism. Esophageal Neoplasms / metabolism. Golgi Apparatus / metabolism. Loss of Heterozygosity. Skin Neoplasms / metabolism
  • [MeSH-minor] Aging / genetics. Aging / metabolism. Aging / pathology. Animals. Apoptosis / genetics. Basement Membrane / metabolism. Basement Membrane / ultrastructure. Cardiovascular System / embryology. Coated Pits, Cell-Membrane / genetics. Coated Pits, Cell-Membrane / metabolism. Coated Pits, Cell-Membrane / ultrastructure. Desmosomes / genetics. Desmosomes / metabolism. Desmosomes / ultrastructure. Endoplasmic Reticulum, Rough / genetics. Endoplasmic Reticulum, Rough / metabolism. Endoplasmic Reticulum, Rough / ultrastructure. Female. Genetic Predisposition to Disease. Hematopoiesis / genetics. Heterozygote. Homozygote. Humans. Inbreeding. Male. Mice. Mice, Knockout. Neural Tube Defects / embryology. Neural Tube Defects / metabolism. Neural Tube Defects / pathology. Pemphigus, Benign Familial / genetics. Pemphigus, Benign Familial / metabolism. Pemphigus, Benign Familial / pathology. Pregnancy. Protein Transport / genetics. Ribosomes / metabolism. Secretory Vesicles / genetics. Secretory Vesicles / metabolism. Secretory Vesicles / ultrastructure. Water-Electrolyte Balance / genetics


48. Ge HM, Jiao RH, Zhang YF, Zhang J, Wang YR, Tan RX: Cytotoxicity and phytotoxicity of trichothecene macrolides from Myrothecium gramminum. Planta Med; 2009 Feb;75(3):227-9
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  • (1)H-NMR guided fractionation of the EtOAc extract from the culture of Myrothecium gramminum (strain no. 3.1968) led to the isolation of eight cytotoxic trichothecene macrolides ( 1 - 8), all being substantially inhibitory against HepG2 (human hepatocellular carcinoma) and KB (human nasopharynyeal epidermoid tumor) cell lines with IC (50) values ranging from 2.2 to 12.2 mug/mL.
  • Their inactivity to or weaker action on Vero cells (IC (50) values > 20 microg/mL, originated from the African green monkey kidney) highlighted preliminarily the nature of the selective cytotoxicity of the fungal metabolites against the test cancer cell lines.
  • [MeSH-major] Cytotoxins / pharmacology. Hypocreales / chemistry. Macrolides / pharmacology. Neoplasms / drug therapy. Phytotherapy. Poaceae / drug effects
  • [MeSH-minor] Animals. Cell Line, Tumor. Cercopithecus aethiops. Humans. Liver Neoplasms / drug therapy. Molecular Structure. Nasopharyngeal Neoplasms / drug therapy. Vero Cells

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  • (PMID = 19097001.001).
  • [ISSN] 0032-0943
  • [Journal-full-title] Planta medica
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Planta Med.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
  • [Publication-country] Germany
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Cytotoxins; 0 / Macrolides
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49. Cowen EW, Nguyen JC, Miller DD, McShane D, Arron ST, Prose NS, Turner ML, Fox LP: Chronic phototoxicity and aggressive squamous cell carcinoma of the skin in children and adults during treatment with voriconazole. J Am Acad Dermatol; 2010 Jan;62(1):31-7
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  • [Title] Chronic phototoxicity and aggressive squamous cell carcinoma of the skin in children and adults during treatment with voriconazole.
  • A possible link with aggressive squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) has also been reported.
  • METHODS: We conducted a retrospective review of patients who developed one or more squamous cell neoplasms during long-term treatment with voriconazole at 3 academic dermatology centers.
  • Underlying diagnoses included graft-versus-host disease, HIV, and Wegener granulomatosis.
  • [MeSH-major] Antifungal Agents / adverse effects. Carcinoma, Squamous Cell / chemically induced. Dermatitis, Phototoxic / etiology. Pyrimidines / adverse effects. Skin Neoplasms / chemically induced. Triazoles / adverse effects
  • [MeSH-minor] Adolescent. Adult. Child. Comorbidity. DNA Damage / radiation effects. Fatal Outcome. Female. Hematopoietic Stem Cell Transplantation. Humans. Immunocompromised Host. Middle Aged. Retrospective Studies. Voriconazole. Young Adult


50. Clayton AC, Bentz JS, Wasserman PG, Schwartz MR, Souers RJ, Chmara BA, Laucirica R, Clary KM, Moriarty AT, College of American Pathologists Cytopathology Resource Committee: Comparison of ThinPrep preparations to other preparation types in gastrointestinal cytology: observations from the College of American Pathologists Interlaboratory Comparison Program in Nongynecologic Cytology. Arch Pathol Lab Med; 2010 Aug;134(8):1116-20
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  • DESIGN: Participant responses between 2000 and 2007 were evaluated for esophageal wash/brush, gastric wash/brush, and biliary tract brush specimens with a reference diagnosis of adenocarcinoma, squamous cell carcinoma, carcinoid, or spindle cell neoplasm.
  • Overall performance of cytotechnologists was not different from that of pathologists (89.2% versus 89.0%; P = .75).
  • Cytotechnologists had better performance for detecting squamous cell carcinoma (96.3% versus 92.6%; P < .001), while pathologists had better performance for detecting spindle cell neoplasm (79.7% versus 42.9%; P < .001).
  • Cytotechnologists and pathologists performed at the same level overall, but with differences for the diagnosis of spindle cell neoplasm and squamous carcinoma.
  • [MeSH-major] Adenocarcinoma / diagnosis. Carcinoma, Squamous Cell / diagnosis. Gastrointestinal Neoplasms / diagnosis. Laboratories, Hospital / standards. Pathology, Clinical / methods

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  • (PMID = 20670130.001).
  • [ISSN] 1543-2165
  • [Journal-full-title] Archives of pathology & laboratory medicine
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Arch. Pathol. Lab. Med.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Comparative Study; Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] United States
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51. Falsarella PM, Alves-Filho G, Mazzali M: Skin malignancies in renal transplant recipients: a Brazilian center registry. Transplant Proc; 2008 Apr;40(3):767-8
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  • Recipients of pancreas kidney transplants or with suspected but not biopsy-proven skin malignancy were excluded from this series.
  • The most frequent skin cancer was squamous cell carcinoma (46.2%), in single or multiple lesions (50% each group).
  • Basal cell carcinoma was diagnosed in seven patients; most presented as a single lesion (71.3%).
  • Eight patients presented with more than one histologic type of skin cancer; most frequently squamous and basal cell carcinomas.
  • Kaposi sarcoma was diagnosed in four patients, one of whom also had a basal cell carcinoma.
  • The most frequent tumor was squamous cell carcinoma, isolated or in association with basal cell carcinoma.
  • [MeSH-major] Kidney Transplantation / adverse effects. Postoperative Complications / epidemiology. Skin Neoplasms / epidemiology

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  • (PMID = 18455011.001).
  • [ISSN] 0041-1345
  • [Journal-full-title] Transplantation proceedings
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Transplant. Proc.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] United States
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52. Ovali GY, Sakar A, Göktan C, Celik P, Yorgancioğlu A, Nese N, Pabuscu Y: Thorax perfusion CT in non-small cell lung cancer. Comput Med Imaging Graph; 2007 Dec;31(8):686-91
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  • [Title] Thorax perfusion CT in non-small cell lung cancer.
  • OBJECTIVES: We aimed to determine the perfusion differences according to the histological type, stage, volume and prognoses in the non-small cell carcinoma by thorax perfusion CT.
  • MATERIALS AND METHODS: Twenty-four non-small cell carcinoma patients were included in the study.
  • Thorax perfusion CT was done to evaluate the tumors in terms of perfusion parameters: blood flow (BF) and time to peak (TTP) values.
  • RESULTS: The total blood flow of the tumor in squamous cell carcinoma was significantly higher than adenocarcinoma (p=0.031).
  • CONCLUSIONS: Perfusion CT may help us in evaluating non-small cell carcinomas.
  • [MeSH-major] Carcinoma, Non-Small-Cell Lung / radiography. Lung Neoplasms / radiography

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  • (PMID = 17904334.001).
  • [ISSN] 0895-6111
  • [Journal-full-title] Computerized medical imaging and graphics : the official journal of the Computerized Medical Imaging Society
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Comput Med Imaging Graph
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] United States
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53. Epperly MW, Franicola D, Zhang X, Nie S, Greenberger JS: Effect of EGFR antagonists gefitinib (Iressa) and C225 (Cetuximab) on MnSOD-plasmid liposome transgene radiosensitization of a murine squamous cell carcinoma cell line. In Vivo; 2006 Nov-Dec;20(6B):791-6
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  • [Title] Effect of EGFR antagonists gefitinib (Iressa) and C225 (Cetuximab) on MnSOD-plasmid liposome transgene radiosensitization of a murine squamous cell carcinoma cell line.
  • Radiation therapy of tumors of the head and neck region is compromised by dose limiting toxicity of normal tissues including the oral cavity and oropharyngeal mucosa.
  • MnSOD-Plasmid Liposome (MnSOD-PL) intraoral gene therapy has been demonstrated to decrease normal tissue toxicity and also improve survival in mice with orthotopic SCC-VII squamous cell tumors on the floor of the mouth.
  • Furthermore, intravenous administration of MnSOD-PL in mice with orthotopic tumors, or addition of MnSOD-PL to tumor cell lines in vitro produces a radiosensitizing effect attributable to differences in antioxidant pool responses of tumor cells compared to normal tissues following irradiation.
  • To determine whether EGF receptor (EGFR) antagonists Iressa, or Cetuximab provided further improvement of radiation killing of squamous cell tumors, MnSOD-PL transfected or control SCCVII tumor cells were irradiated in vitro, and then the effect of EGFR receptor antagonists was tested.
  • The results suggest some synergy of the effectiveness of the EGFR antagonist Iressa on increasing the radiation killing of SCC-VII cells that supplements MnSOD-PL tumor radiosensitization.
  • [MeSH-minor] Animals. Antibodies, Monoclonal, Humanized. Antineoplastic Agents / pharmacology. Carcinoma, Squamous Cell / genetics. Carcinoma, Squamous Cell / pathology. Cell Line, Tumor. Cell Survival / drug effects. Cell Survival / genetics. Cell Survival / radiation effects. Cetuximab. Dose-Response Relationship, Radiation. Liposomes. Mice. Transfection. Transgenes / genetics

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  • [ErratumIn] In Vivo. 2007 Nov-Dec;21(6):1172
  • (PMID = 17203769.001).
  • [ISSN] 0258-851X
  • [Journal-full-title] In vivo (Athens, Greece)
  • [ISO-abbreviation] In Vivo
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] Greece
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Antibodies, Monoclonal; 0 / Antibodies, Monoclonal, Humanized; 0 / Antineoplastic Agents; 0 / Liposomes; 0 / Quinazolines; EC 1.15.1.1 / Superoxide Dismutase; EC 2.7.10.1 / Receptor, Epidermal Growth Factor; PQX0D8J21J / Cetuximab; S65743JHBS / gefitinib
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54. Prasad V, Boivin GP, Miller ML, Liu LH, Erwin CR, Warner BW, Shull GE: Haploinsufficiency of Atp2a2, encoding the sarco(endo)plasmic reticulum Ca2+-ATPase isoform 2 Ca2+ pump, predisposes mice to squamous cell tumors via a novel mode of cancer susceptibility. Cancer Res; 2005 Oct 1;65(19):8655-61
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  • [Title] Haploinsufficiency of Atp2a2, encoding the sarco(endo)plasmic reticulum Ca2+-ATPase isoform 2 Ca2+ pump, predisposes mice to squamous cell tumors via a novel mode of cancer susceptibility.
  • A null mutation in one copy of the Atp2a2 or ATP2A2 gene, encoding sarco(endo)plasmic reticulum Ca2+-ATPase isoform 2 (SERCA2), leads to squamous cell tumors in mice and to Darier disease in humans, a skin disorder that also involves keratinocytes.
  • Here, we examined the time course and genetic mechanisms of tumor development in the mutant animals.
  • By the age of 5 to 7 months, 22% of mutants had developed papillomas of the forestomach, and 89% of mutants older than 14 months had developed squamous cell papillomas and/or carcinomas, with a preponderance of the latter.
  • Tumors occurred in regions that had keratinized epithelium and were subjected to repeated mechanical irritation.
  • The genetic mechanism of tumorigenesis did not involve loss of heterozygosity, as tumor cells analyzed by laser capture microdissection contained the wild-type Atp2a2 allele.
  • Furthermore, immunoblot and immunohistochemical analysis showed that tumor keratinocytes expressed the SERCA2 protein.
  • Mutations were not observed in the ras proto-oncogenes; however, expression of wild-type ras was up-regulated, with particularly high levels of K-ras.
  • Loss of the p53 tumor suppressor gene occurred in a single massive tumor, whereas other tumors had increased levels of p53 protein but no mutations in the p53 gene.
  • These findings show that SERCA2 haploinsufficiency predisposes mice to tumor development via a novel mode of cancer susceptibility involving a global change in the tumorigenic potential of keratinized epithelium in Atp2a2+/- mice.
  • [MeSH-major] Calcium-Transporting ATPases / genetics. Carcinoma, Squamous Cell / enzymology. Carcinoma, Squamous Cell / genetics. Stomach Neoplasms / enzymology. Stomach Neoplasms / genetics
  • [MeSH-minor] Alleles. Animals. Genes, p53. Genes, ras. Genetic Predisposition to Disease. Humans. Keratinocytes / metabolism. Keratins / metabolism. Loss of Heterozygosity. Male. Mice. Sarcoplasmic Reticulum Calcium-Transporting ATPases. Tumor Suppressor Protein p53 / biosynthesis. Tumor Suppressor Protein p53 / genetics

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  • (PMID = 16204033.001).
  • [ISSN] 0008-5472
  • [Journal-full-title] Cancer research
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Cancer Res.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Grant] United States / NIDDK NIH HHS / DK / DK50594; United States / NIEHS NIH HHS / ES / ES06096; United States / NHLBI NIH HHS / HL / HL61974
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural; Research Support, U.S. Gov't, P.H.S.
  • [Publication-country] United States
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Tumor Suppressor Protein p53; 68238-35-7 / Keratins; EC 3.6.3.8 / ATP2A2 protein, human; EC 3.6.3.8 / Atp2a2 protein, mouse; EC 3.6.3.8 / Calcium-Transporting ATPases; EC 3.6.3.8 / Sarcoplasmic Reticulum Calcium-Transporting ATPases
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55. Greenstein AJ, Litle VR, Swanson SJ, Divino CM, Packer S, McGinn TG, Wisnivesky JP: Racial disparities in esophageal cancer treatment and outcomes. Ann Surg Oncol; 2008 Mar;15(3):881-8
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  • Blacks were more likely to be diagnosed at a more advanced stage and to have squamous cell tumors, but were less likely to undergo surgery.
  • In multivariate regression controlling for age, sex, marital status, histology, and tumor location, black race was associated with worse survival.
  • When tumor status, surgery, and radiotherapy were added to the model, race was no longer significantly associated with survival.
  • While the disparity is due in part to differences in tumor histology, diagnosis at an earlier stage and higher rates of surgery among blacks could reduce this survival disparity.
  • [MeSH-major] Adenocarcinoma / ethnology. Carcinoma, Squamous Cell / ethnology. Esophageal Neoplasms / ethnology. Esophageal Neoplasms / therapy. Healthcare Disparities


56. Aréchaga-Ocampo E, Pereira-Suárez AL, del Moral-Hernández O, Cedillo-Barrón L, Rodríguez-Sastre MA, Castillo-Alvarez A, López-Bayghen E, Villegas-Sepúlveda N: HPV+ cervical carcinomas and cell lines display altered expression of caspases. Gynecol Oncol; 2008 Jan;108(1):10-8
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  • [Title] HPV+ cervical carcinomas and cell lines display altered expression of caspases.
  • OBJECTIVE: Loss of expression of apoptotic regulatory proteins in many neoplasias might result in defective or delayed apoptosis, thus facilitating tumor growth or survival.
  • We analyzed here, the basal expression of precursors of apoptotic Caspases in normal cervical epithelium, HPV+ cervical tumor samples and HPV+ tumor-derived cell lines.
  • METHODS: Expression of initiator and effector Caspases was analyzed by immunochemistry in normal cervical epithelium and three types of cervical tumors (squamous cell carcinoma, adenocarcinoma and adenosquamous cell carcinoma) whereas expression of Caspases in HeLa, SiHa and CaSki cells was by immunofluorescence, Western blot and RT-PCR.
  • RESULTS: Expression of Caspases 3 and 9 was undetectable in adenocarcinoma and adenosquamous cell carcinoma, respectively.
  • Whereas in squamous cell carcinoma, the expression of Caspases was similar those observed in normal samples.
  • Expression of Caspases 3 and 6 was low in HeLa and CaSki cells, while Caspase 8 was low in SiHa and it was not detected in C33-A cells.
  • We did not observe an effect of the E6/E7 oncogenes on the expression of Caspases in C33-A cell.
  • CONCLUSION: Our results showed a differential expression of several Caspases in carcinoma samples and cell lines, suggesting multiple alterations of the Caspase pathways in cervical cancer.
  • [MeSH-major] Caspases / biosynthesis. Papillomavirus Infections / enzymology. Uterine Cervical Neoplasms / enzymology. Uterine Cervical Neoplasms / virology
  • [MeSH-minor] Adenocarcinoma / enzymology. Adenocarcinoma / pathology. Adenocarcinoma / virology. Blotting, Western. Carcinoma, Adenosquamous / enzymology. Carcinoma, Adenosquamous / pathology. Carcinoma, Adenosquamous / virology. Carcinoma, Squamous Cell / enzymology. Carcinoma, Squamous Cell / pathology. Carcinoma, Squamous Cell / virology. Cell Line, Tumor. Female. Fluorescent Antibody Technique. HeLa Cells. Human papillomavirus 16. Human papillomavirus 18. Humans. Immunohistochemistry. Isoenzymes / biosynthesis. Paraffin Embedding. Reverse Transcriptase Polymerase Chain Reaction

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  • (PMID = 17936882.001).
  • [ISSN] 1095-6859
  • [Journal-full-title] Gynecologic oncology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Gynecol. Oncol.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
  • [Publication-country] United States
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Isoenzymes; EC 3.4.22.- / Caspases
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57. Plaza JA, Ortega PF, Bengana C, Stockman DL, Suster S: Immunolabeling pattern of podoplanin (d2-40) may distinguish basal cell carcinomas from trichoepitheliomas: a clinicopathologic and immunohistochemical study of 49 cases. Am J Dermatopathol; 2010 Oct;32(7):683-7
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  • [Title] Immunolabeling pattern of podoplanin (d2-40) may distinguish basal cell carcinomas from trichoepitheliomas: a clinicopathologic and immunohistochemical study of 49 cases.
  • When the morphologic distinction between basal cell carcinomas (BCCs) and tichoepitheliomas is unclear, it poses a rare diagnostic challenge as the commonly defined histologic criterion is insufficient for differentiating these two neoplasms from each other.
  • Their distinction is clinically important because the risk of progressive disease in BCC can be problematic, and trichoepitheliomas misinterpreted as BCC burdens the patient with an inaccurate diagnosis and consequential inappropriate surgery.
  • Podoplanin (D2-40) is a well-known lymphatic endothelial surface marker that has been postulated to be upregulated in the outer root sheath of hair follicles and cutaneous neoplasms, such as adnexal tumors, squamous cell carcinomas, etc.
  • We studied the expression of D2-40 by immunohistochemistry to determine if this marker could reliably differentiate these neoplasms from each other.
  • A total of 49 cutaneous tumors, including 22 cases of trichoepitheliomas and 27 cases of BCC were examined.
  • This data suggests that D2-40 expression could be a useful potential marker to distinguish BCCs from trichoepitheliomas, especially when there is a high index of histologic suspicion for either of these two tumors.
  • [MeSH-major] Biomarkers, Tumor / analysis. Carcinoma, Basal Cell / diagnosis. Membrane Glycoproteins / biosynthesis. Neoplasms, Basal Cell / diagnosis. Skin Neoplasms / diagnosis
  • [MeSH-minor] Antibodies, Monoclonal. Antibodies, Monoclonal, Murine-Derived. Diagnosis, Differential. Humans. Immunohistochemistry. Predictive Value of Tests

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  • (PMID = 20559122.001).
  • [ISSN] 1533-0311
  • [Journal-full-title] The American Journal of dermatopathology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Am J Dermatopathol
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] United States
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Antibodies, Monoclonal; 0 / Antibodies, Monoclonal, Murine-Derived; 0 / Biomarkers, Tumor; 0 / Membrane Glycoproteins; 0 / PDPN protein, human; 0 / monoclonal antibody D2-40
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58. Silveira NJ, Varuzza L, Machado-Lima A, Lauretto MS, Pinheiro DG, Rodrigues RV, Severino P, Nobrega FG, Head and Neck Genome Project GENCAPO, Silva WA Jr, de B Pereira CA, Tajara EH: Searching for molecular markers in head and neck squamous cell carcinomas (HNSCC) by statistical and bioinformatic analysis of larynx-derived SAGE libraries. BMC Med Genomics; 2008;1:56
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  • [Title] Searching for molecular markers in head and neck squamous cell carcinomas (HNSCC) by statistical and bioinformatic analysis of larynx-derived SAGE libraries.
  • BACKGROUND: Head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC) is one of the most common malignancies in humans.
  • When detected early, HNSCC has a good prognosis, but most patients present metastatic disease at the time of diagnosis, which significantly reduces survival rate.
  • METHODS: Aiming to identify differentially-expressed genes involved in laryngeal squamous cell carcinoma (LSCC) development and progression, we generated individual Serial Analysis of Gene Expression (SAGE) libraries from a metastatic and non-metastatic larynx carcinoma, as well as from a normal larynx mucosa sample.
  • RESULTS: Statistical data analysis identified a subset of 1,216 differentially expressed tags between tumor and normal libraries, and 894 differentially expressed tags between metastatic and non-metastatic carcinomas.
  • Consistent with our statistical analysis, quantitative PCR confirmed the upregulation of BST2 and MFAP2 and the downregulation of KRT31 when samples of HNSCC were compared to tumor-free surgical margins.
  • As expected, GNA15 presented a non-significant differential expression pattern when tumor samples were compared to normal tissues.
  • CONCLUSION: To the best of our knowledge, this is the first study reporting SAGE data in head and neck squamous cell tumors.
  • This result suggests the existence of potential common biomarkers for prognosis and targeted-therapy development in this heterogeneous type of tumor.

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  • (PMID = 19014460.001).
  • [ISSN] 1755-8794
  • [Journal-full-title] BMC medical genomics
  • [ISO-abbreviation] BMC Med Genomics
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] England
  • [Other-IDs] NLM/ PMC2629771
  • [Investigator] Curry PM; de Carvalho MB; Dias-Neto E; Figueiredo DL; Fukuyama EE; Góis-Filho JF; Leopoldino AM; Mamede RC; Michaluart-Junior P; Moreira-Filho CA; Moyses RA; Nóbrega FG; Nóbrega MP; Nunes FD; Ojopi EP; Okamoto OK; Serafini LN; Severino P; Silva AM; Silva WA Jr; Silveira NJ; Souza SC; Tajara EH; Wünsch-Filho V; Zago MA; Amar A; Arap SS; Araújo NS; Araújo-Filho V; Barbieri RB; Bandeira CM; Bastos AU; Braconi MA; Brandão LG; Brandão RM; Canto AL; Carmona-Raphe J; Carvalho-Neto PB; Casemiro AF; Cerione M; Cernea CR; Cicco R; Chagas MJ; Chedid H; Chiappini PB; Correia LA; Costa A; Costa AC; Cunha BR; Curioni OA; Dias TH; Durazzo M; Ferraz AR; Figueiredo RO; Fortes CS; Franzi SA; Frizzera AP; Gallo J; Gazito D; Guimarães PE; Gutierres AP; Inamine R; Kaneto CM; Lehn CN; López RV; Macarenco R; Magalhães RP; Martins AE; Meneses C; Mercante AM; Montenegro FL; Pinheiro DG; Polachini GM; Porsani AF; Rapoport A; Rodini CO; Rodrigues AN; Rodrigues-Lisoni FC; Rodrigues RV; Rossi L; Santos AR; Santos M; Settani F; Silva FA; Silva IT; Silva-Filho GB; Smith RB; Souza TB; Stabenow E; Takamori JT; Tavares MR; Turcano R; Valentim PJ; Vidotto A; Volpi EM; Xavier FC; Yamagushi F; Cominato ML; Correa PM; Mendes GS; Paiva R; Ramos O; Silva C; Silva MJ; Tarlá MV
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59. El Khatib K, Danino A, Trost O, Jidal B, Malka G: [Use of nasolabial flap for mouth floor reconstruction]. Ann Chir Plast Esthet; 2005 Jun;50(3):216-20
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  • SUBJECT: Oral cavity cancers represent 30% of the cephalic extremity tumors.
  • The patients benefited from a surgical resection of the tumor by respecting the safety margins, with an immediate reconstruction allowing the restoring of the oral functions.
  • The majority of tumors were squamous cell carcinomas (50 cases).
  • As complications, we noted one complete necrosis and two partial necrosis of the flap, two postoperative wound complications with dehiscence as well as a massive local recurrence of initial tumor in one patient.
  • [MeSH-major] Mouth Neoplasms / surgery. Neoplasm Recurrence, Local. Postoperative Complications. Reconstructive Surgical Procedures / methods. Surgical Flaps

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  • (PMID = 15896896.001).
  • [ISSN] 0294-1260
  • [Journal-full-title] Annales de chirurgie plastique et esthétique
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Ann Chir Plast Esthet
  • [Language] fre
  • [Publication-type] English Abstract; Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] France
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60. Safranek PM, Sujendran V, Baron R, Warner N, Blesing C, Maynard ND: Oxford experience with neoadjuvant chemotherapy and surgical resection for esophageal adenocarcinomas and squamous cell tumors. Dis Esophagus; 2008;21(3):201-6
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  • [Title] Oxford experience with neoadjuvant chemotherapy and surgical resection for esophageal adenocarcinomas and squamous cell tumors.
  • Since February 2000 it has been our practice to offer this chemotherapy regime to patients with T2 and T3 or T1N1 tumors.
  • Six patients (5.7%) had progressive disease and were inoperable (discovered in four at surgery).
  • A total of 182 patients with a median age of 63 (range 30-80), 41 squamous and 141 adenocarcinomas underwent surgery.
  • A radical surgical approach to the primary tumor in combination with OEO2 neoadjuvant chemotherapy has led to a high R0 resection rate and good survival with acceptable morbidity and mortality.

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  • (PMID = 18430099.001).
  • [ISSN] 1442-2050
  • [Journal-full-title] Diseases of the esophagus : official journal of the International Society for Diseases of the Esophagus
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Dis. Esophagus
  • [Language] ENG
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] United States
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61. Cirillo F: Neuroendocrine tumors and their association with rare tumors: observation of 4 cases. Eur Rev Med Pharmacol Sci; 2010 Jul;14(7):577-88
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  • [Title] Neuroendocrine tumors and their association with rare tumors: observation of 4 cases.
  • PURPOSE: Neuroendocrine tumors are rare neoplasms, with an incidence of about 1/100,000/year.
  • The association between digestive neuroendocrine tumors and epithelial tumors is known, accounting for about 10% of cases, whilst in a very small number of other cases an association with other low incidence tumors has been observed.
  • METHODS: During the past 19 years the Rare Hormonal Tumors Group of the Istituti Ospitalieri in Cremona, Italy has observed 300 patients affected by neuroendocrine tumors.
  • We report here on four cases in which there was an unusual association with other rare neoplasms.
  • RESULTS: Overall, four of the 300 observed cases (1.3%) showed an unusual association with rare nonepithelial neoplasms:.
  • (2) Merkel cell tumor and squamous cell carcinoma of the skin;.
  • (3) medullary thyroid carcinoma, yolk sac tumor of the testis and gastrointestinal stromal tumor (GIST);.
  • (4) gastric carcinoid and gastrointestinal stromal tumor (GIST).
  • DISCUSSION: There cases are of interest not only from an epidemiological point of view, but also offer insight into possible geno-phenotypical implications.
  • The c-kit expression, typical of GISTs but observed also in other epithelial and neuroendocrine tumors, not only broadens the possibility to gain insight into the carcinogenesis of these neoplasms, but also opens the field to possible new therapeutic opportunities using multitargeted molecules.
  • The contemporaneous presence of other lesions, such as the Merkel cell tumor and the squamous cell carcinoma of the skin can be interpreted as an answer by the cell to the same mutagenic stimulus.
  • In other cases, where a possible link is not yet found which could explain the synchronism or metachronism of low incidence neoplasms, it remains possible that the associations are entirely coincidental.
  • We await for new instruments which could help us demonstrate the possible relationships between low incidence neoplasms.
  • [MeSH-major] Neoplasms / pathology. Neuroendocrine Tumors / pathology

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  • (PMID = 20707247.001).
  • [ISSN] 1128-3602
  • [Journal-full-title] European review for medical and pharmacological sciences
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Eur Rev Med Pharmacol Sci
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Case Reports; Journal Article; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
  • [Publication-country] Italy
  • [Chemical-registry-number] EC 2.7.10.1 / Proto-Oncogene Proteins c-kit
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62. Roma AA, Goldblum JR, Fazio V, Yang B: Expression of 14-3-3sigma, p16 and p53 proteins in anal squamous intraepithelial neoplasm and squamous cell carcinoma. Int J Clin Exp Pathol; 2008;1(5):419-25
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  • [Title] Expression of 14-3-3sigma, p16 and p53 proteins in anal squamous intraepithelial neoplasm and squamous cell carcinoma.
  • 14-3-3sigma is a p53-regulated G2/M inhibitor involved in numerous cellular signaling pathways related to cell cycle, DNA repair and apoptosis.
  • Recent studies have showed that 14-3-3sigma was silenced transcriptionally through promoter hypermethylation mainly in HPV-negative vulvar squamous cell carcinoma (SCC).
  • However, the expression of 14-3-3sigma protein has not yet been studied in anal SCC and its precursor, anal intraepithelial neoplasm (AIN).
  • In this study, we evaluated the expression of 14-3-3sigma, p16 and p53 in 34 cases of normal perianal squamous mucosa, 5 cases of squamous hyperplasia and 62 cases of AIN, including 54 bowenoid and 8 differentiated AINs.
  • Expression of p16, p53 and 14-3-3sigma proteins was not seen in normal squamous epithelium.
  • Weak staining for 14-3-3sigma was seen in anal squamous hyperplasia.

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  • (PMID = 18787619.001).
  • [ISSN] 1936-2625
  • [Journal-full-title] International journal of clinical and experimental pathology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Int J Clin Exp Pathol
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] United States
  • [Other-IDs] NLM/ PMC2480570
  • [Keywords] NOTNLM ; 14-3-3σ / AIN / Anal intraepithelial neoplasm / Bowenoid / differentiated / p16 / p53 / simplex
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63. Li XJ, Lin M, Liu CY, Xie HL: [Expression and clinical significance of EMS1 gene in gastric carcinoma]. Ai Zheng; 2008 Mar;27(3):323-6
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  • BACKGROUND & OBJECTIVE: EMS1 (chromosome eleven, band q13, mammary tumor and squamous cell carcinoma-associated gene 1) is correlated to the genesis, progression, invasion and metastasis of some malignancies.
  • METHODS: The expression of EMS1 protein in 20 specimens of normal gastric mucosa, 38 specimens of intraepithelial neoplasia, and 146 specimens of gastric carcinoma was detected by immunohistochemistry.
  • The positive rate of EMS1 protein was significantly higher in gastric carcinoma than in intraepithelial neoplasia and normal gastric mucosa (89.7% vs. 68.4% and 20.0%, P<0.001), and significantly higher in intraepithelial neoplasia than in normal gastric mucosa (P<0.001).
  • EMS1 protein expression had no correlations to sex, age, tumor differentiation and diameter.
  • [MeSH-major] Cortactin / genetics. Stomach Neoplasms / genetics
  • [MeSH-minor] Adult. Aged. Female. Humans. Immunohistochemistry. Lymphatic Metastasis. Male. Middle Aged. Neoplasm Staging

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  • (PMID = 18334127.001).
  • [Journal-full-title] Ai zheng = Aizheng = Chinese journal of cancer
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Ai Zheng
  • [Language] chi
  • [Publication-type] English Abstract; Journal Article; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
  • [Publication-country] China
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / CTTN protein, human; 0 / Cortactin
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64. Song XM, Yuan Y, Tao ZJ, Wu HM, Yuan H, Wu YN: Application of lateral arm free flap in oral and maxillofacial reconstruction following tumor surgery. Med Princ Pract; 2007;16(5):394-8
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  • [Title] Application of lateral arm free flap in oral and maxillofacial reconstruction following tumor surgery.
  • Sixteen LAFF were harvested to reconstruct defects caused by the dissection of malignant tumors of the oral and maxillofacial regions.
  • The tumor was squamous cell carcinoma of the tongue (6 cases), floor of the mouth (4), retromolar area (3), inner cheek (2), and lower gingival (1).
  • [MeSH-major] Carcinoma, Squamous Cell / surgery. Mouth Neoplasms / surgery. Reconstructive Surgical Procedures / methods. Surgical Flaps

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  • [Copyright] 2007 S. Karger AG, Basel
  • (PMID = 17709930.001).
  • [ISSN] 1423-0151
  • [Journal-full-title] Medical principles and practice : international journal of the Kuwait University, Health Science Centre
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Med Princ Pract
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] Switzerland
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65. Matsumoto K, Hyodo F, Matsumoto A, Koretsky AP, Sowers AL, Mitchell JB, Krishna MC: High-resolution mapping of tumor redox status by magnetic resonance imaging using nitroxides as redox-sensitive contrast agents. Clin Cancer Res; 2006 Apr 15;12(8):2455-62
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  • [Title] High-resolution mapping of tumor redox status by magnetic resonance imaging using nitroxides as redox-sensitive contrast agents.
  • The levels of 3CP were examined by EPRI and MRI for differences in reduction between muscle and tumor (squamous cell carcinoma) implanted in the hind leg of C3H mice simultaneously.
  • The tumor regions exhibited a faster decay rate of the nitroxide compared to muscle (0.097 min(-1) versus 0.067 min(-1), respectively).
  • [MeSH-major] Magnetic Resonance Imaging / methods. Neoplasms, Experimental / pathology. Nitrogen Oxides / chemistry
  • [MeSH-minor] Animals. Carcinoma, Squamous Cell / metabolism. Carcinoma, Squamous Cell / pathology. Cyclic N-Oxides / chemistry. Cyclic N-Oxides / metabolism. Electron Spin Resonance Spectroscopy / methods. Female. Mice. Mice, Inbred C3H. Models, Chemical. Muscles / metabolism. Oxidation-Reduction. Pyrrolidines / chemistry. Pyrrolidines / metabolism

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  • (PMID = 16638852.001).
  • [ISSN] 1078-0432
  • [Journal-full-title] Clinical cancer research : an official journal of the American Association for Cancer Research
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Clin. Cancer Res.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Grant] United States / Intramural NIH HHS / / Z01 NS003047-01
  • [Publication-type] Comparative Study; Journal Article; Research Support, N.I.H., Intramural
  • [Publication-country] United States
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Cyclic N-Oxides; 0 / Nitrogen Oxides; 0 / Pyrrolidines; 14332-28-6 / nitroxyl; 4399-80-8 / 3-carbamoyl-2,2,5,5-tetramethyl-1-pyrrolidinyl-N-oxyl
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66. Candelaria M, Arias-Bonfill D, Chávez-Blanco A, Chanona J, Cantú D, Pérez C, Dueñas-González A: Lack in efficacy for imatinib mesylate as second-line treatment of recurrent or metastatic cervical cancer expressing platelet-derived growth factor receptor alpha. Int J Gynecol Cancer; 2009 Dec;19(9):1632-7
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  • The median age was 49.8 years; all but 1 tumor were squamous cell carcinomas.
  • Ten (83.3%) had pelvic and systemic disease, whereas only 2 had systemic disease alone.
  • A single patient having metastatic disease in the lung showed stabilization for 6 months to then progressing in bone.
  • Despite lack of activity of single-agent imatinib, further studies in cervical cancer are deserved to better define the status of imatinib targets in this tumor and to investigate its activity in combination with cytotoxic drugs.
  • [MeSH-major] Carcinoma, Squamous Cell / drug therapy. Piperazines / therapeutic use. Pyrimidines / therapeutic use. Receptor, Platelet-Derived Growth Factor alpha / metabolism. Uterine Cervical Neoplasms / drug therapy
  • [MeSH-minor] Adult. Aged. Antineoplastic Agents / adverse effects. Antineoplastic Agents / therapeutic use. Benzamides. Chemotherapy, Adjuvant. Female. Humans. Imatinib Mesylate. Middle Aged. Neoplasm Metastasis. Recurrence. Survival Analysis. Treatment Outcome

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  • (PMID = 19955950.001).
  • [ISSN] 1525-1438
  • [Journal-full-title] International journal of gynecological cancer : official journal of the International Gynecological Cancer Society
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Int. J. Gynecol. Cancer
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Clinical Trial; Journal Article; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
  • [Publication-country] United States
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Antineoplastic Agents; 0 / Benzamides; 0 / Piperazines; 0 / Pyrimidines; 8A1O1M485B / Imatinib Mesylate; EC 2.7.10.1 / Receptor, Platelet-Derived Growth Factor alpha
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67. Treiyer A, Blanc G, Stark E, Haben B, Treiyer E, Steffens J: Prepubertal testicular tumors: frequently overlooked. J Pediatr Urol; 2007 Dec;3(6):480-3
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  • [Title] Prepubertal testicular tumors: frequently overlooked.
  • OBJECTIVE: Prepubertal testicular tumors are fundamentally distinct from their adult counterparts.
  • MATERIAL AND METHODS: A retrospective review was performed of all testicular tumors diagnosed between 1996 and 2006 in males younger than 14 years.
  • RESULTS: Of 15 primary testicular tumors, eight (53%) were germ-cell tumors (three teratomas, two yolk sac tumors, one seminoma, one embryonic carcinoma and one choriocarcinoma), four (27%) tumor-like lesions (epidermoid cysts), two (13%) gonadal stromal tumors (a Leydig and a Sertoli cell tumor), and one (7%) gonadoblastoma with gonadal dysgenesis.
  • All boys were presented with a painless scrotal mass and four (27%) of them with elevated tumor markers.
  • At a mean 4-year follow-up no patient has presented with recurrent tumor in the residual or contralateral testicle.
  • Postoperative physical examination and scrotal ultrasound were obtained in 14 patients at a median follow-up of 48.2 months, and there was no evidence of tumor progression.
  • CONCLUSIONS: Benign teratoma and epidermoid cysts were the most common prepubertal testicular tumors.
  • Any suspicion of a testicular tumor warrants an inguinal approach to prevent scrotal violation of the tumor.
  • Our limited experience with testis-sparing procedures supports the current trends that organ-confined surgery should be performed for benign lesions such as teratoma, Leydig cell tumor and epidermoid cysts based on frozen biopsy findings.

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  • (PMID = 18947799.001).
  • [ISSN] 1873-4898
  • [Journal-full-title] Journal of pediatric urology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] J Pediatr Urol
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] England
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68. Ono S, Fujishiro M, Niimi K, Goto O, Kodashima S, Yamamichi N, Omata M: Long-term outcomes of endoscopic submucosal dissection for superficial esophageal squamous cell neoplasms. Gastrointest Endosc; 2009 Nov;70(5):860-6
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  • [Title] Long-term outcomes of endoscopic submucosal dissection for superficial esophageal squamous cell neoplasms.
  • BACKGROUND: The long-term outcomes of endoscopic submucosal dissection (ESD) for superficial esophageal squamous cell neoplasms (ESCNs) have not been evaluated to date.
  • The enrolled patients were divided into 2 groups based on the lesion with the deepest invasion in each patient: group A, intraepithelial neoplasm or invasive carcinoma limited to the lamina propria mucosa and group B, invasive carcinoma deeper than the lamina propria mucosa.
  • [MeSH-major] Carcinoma, Squamous Cell / surgery. Dissection / methods. Endoscopy, Gastrointestinal / methods. Esophageal Neoplasms / surgery. Intestinal Mucosa / surgery
  • [MeSH-minor] Biopsy. Follow-Up Studies. Humans. Incidence. Japan / epidemiology. Neoplasm Recurrence, Local / epidemiology. Retrospective Studies. Survival Rate / trends. Time Factors. Treatment Outcome

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  • (PMID = 19577748.001).
  • [ISSN] 1097-6779
  • [Journal-full-title] Gastrointestinal endoscopy
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Gastrointest. Endosc.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Comparative Study; Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] United States
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69. González-García R, Naval-Gías L, Román-Romero L, Sastre-Pérez J, Rodríguez-Campo FJ: Local recurrences and second primary tumors from squamous cell carcinoma of the oral cavity: a retrospective analytic study of 500 patients. Head Neck; 2009 Sep;31(9):1168-80
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  • [Title] Local recurrences and second primary tumors from squamous cell carcinoma of the oral cavity: a retrospective analytic study of 500 patients.
  • BACKGROUND: The purpose of this study was to evaluate the incidence of local recurrences (LRs) and second primary tumors (SPTs) from squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) of the oral cavity primarily treated with surgery and to further study their relationship with several primary tumor clinical and pathological features.
  • Histological study included TNM classification, tumor size, tumor thickness, surgical margins, perineural infiltration, peritumoral inflammation, and bone involvement.
  • At the end of this time, 53.82% of the patients were alive without evidence of disease, whereas 31.48% had specifically died of disease.
  • The 5-year disease-specific survival rate for the whole series was 67.2%, in contrast to 34.9% in the group of patients with SPT and/or LR.
  • [MeSH-major] Carcinoma, Squamous Cell / pathology. Mouth Neoplasms / pathology. Neoplasm Recurrence, Local / pathology. Neoplasms, Second Primary / pathology
  • [MeSH-minor] Female. Humans. Male. Middle Aged. Neck Dissection. Neoplasms, Radiation-Induced / pathology. Survival Rate


70. National Toxicology Program: Photocarcinogenesis study of aloe vera [CAS NO. 481-72-1(Aloe-emodin)] in SKH-1 mice (simulated solar light and topical application study). Natl Toxicol Program Tech Rep Ser; 2010 Sep;(553):7-33, 35-97, 99-103 passim
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  • Mice that received no cream treatment and were exposed to increasing levels of SSL showed significant SSL exposure-dependent decreases in survival and significant increases in the in-life observations of skin lesion onset, incidence, and multiplicity, and significant SSL exposure-dependent increases in the incidences and multiplicities of histopathology-determined squamous cell nonneoplastic skin lesions (squamous hyperplasia and focal atypical hyperplasia) and squamous cell neoplasms (papilloma, carcinoma in situ, and/or carcinoma).
  • Squamous cell neoplasms were not detected in mice that received no SSL exposure.
  • The topical treatment with the control cream of mice that were exposed to SSL did not impart a measurable effect when compared with comparable measurements in mice that received no cream treatment and were exposed to the same level of SSL, suggesting that the control cream used in these studies did not alter the efficiency of the SSL delivered to mice or the tolerability of mice to SSL.
  • The administration of aloe gel creams to male mice had no effect on the incidences or multiplicities of histopathology-determined squamous cell nonneoplastic skin lesions or neoplasms.
  • Female mice treated with aloe gel creams (3% and 6%) had significantly increased multiplicities of squamous cell neoplasms.
  • In male mice exposed to SSL and treated with the 6% whole leaf cream, a significant increase was observed in the multiplicity of squamous cell neoplasms.
  • Female mice exposed to SSL and treated with the 3% whole leaf creams had significantly decreased multiplicity of squamous cell nonneoplastic lesions and significantly increased multiplicity of squamous cell neoplasms.
  • Female mice exposed to SSL and treated with the 6% whole leaf cream had significantly decreased multiplicity of squamous cell nonneoplastic lesions.
  • Male mice administered the 3% decolorized whole leaf cream had significantly increased multiplicity of squamous cell neoplasms.
  • Female mice administered the 3% decolorized whole leaf cream had significantly decreased multiplicity of squamous cell nonneoplastic skin lesions and significantly increased multiplicity of squamous cell neoplasms.
  • In female mice that received the 6% decolorized whole leaf cream, there was a significant increase in the multiplicity of squamous cell neoplasms.
  • The administration of aloe-emodin creams to male mice had no effect on the incidence or multiplicity of histopathology-determined nonneoplastic skin lesions or squamous cell neoplasms.
  • Female mice treated with the 74.6 µg/g aloe-emodin cream had significantly decreased multiplicity of histopathology-determined squamous cell nonneoplastic skin lesions and significantly increased multiplicity of squamous cell neoplasms.
  • ALOE GEL OR ALOE-EMODIN: under the conditions of these studies, there was a weak enhancing effect of aloe gel or aloe-emodin on the photocarcinogenic activity of SSL in female but not in male SKH-1 mice based on an increase in the multiplicity of histopathologically-determined squamous cell neoplasms.
  • ALOE WHOLE LEAF OR DECOLORIZED WHOLE LEAF: under the conditions of these studies, there was a weak enhancing effect of aloe whole leaf or decolorized whole leaf on the photocarcinogenic activity of SSL in both male and female SKH-1 mice based on an increase in the multiplicity of histopathologically-determined squamous cell neoplasms.
  • [MeSH-major] Aloe / toxicity. Plant Extracts / toxicity. Skin Neoplasms / etiology. Sunlight / adverse effects

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  • (PMID = 21031007.001).
  • [ISSN] 0888-8051
  • [Journal-full-title] National Toxicology Program technical report series
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Natl Toxicol Program Tech Rep Ser
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Technical Report
  • [Publication-country] United States
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Plant Extracts
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71. Németh Z, Velich N, Bogdan S, Ujpál M, Szabó G, Suba ZS: The prognostic role of clinical, morphological and molecular markers in oral squamous cell tumors. Neoplasma; 2005;52(2):95-102
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  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] The prognostic role of clinical, morphological and molecular markers in oral squamous cell tumors.
  • Despite of considerable advances in the diagnostic and therapeutic possibilities, the prognosis of epithelial tumors in the oral cavity is still very poor.
  • These factors may be linked to the patient (e.g. age, sex, general condition and immunological parameters) or to the tumor localization.
  • A survey of the literature reveals that the TNM stage, the grade, the mode of invasion and the depth of the tumor infiltration are generally the most important factors influencing the fate of the patient.
  • The prognosis depends primarily on the clinicopathological parameters, though even if they are known, it is not possible to screen out those patients who are at particular risk of a relapse.
  • [MeSH-major] Biomarkers, Tumor / analysis. Carcinoma, Squamous Cell / pathology. Mouth Neoplasms / pathology. Neoplasm Staging
  • [MeSH-minor] Cell Membrane / chemistry. Genes, Tumor Suppressor. Humans. Immunohistochemistry. Male. Oncogenes. Prognosis. Survival

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  • (PMID = 15800706.001).
  • [ISSN] 0028-2685
  • [Journal-full-title] Neoplasma
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Neoplasma
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Review
  • [Publication-country] Slovakia
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Biomarkers, Tumor
  • [Number-of-references] 74
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72. Kluger N, Minier-Thoumin C, Plantier F: Keratoacanthoma occurring within the red dye of a tattoo. J Cutan Pathol; 2008 May;35(5):504-7
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  • Keratoacanthoma (KA) is a common keratinizing squamous cell neoplasm of unknown origin characterized by rapid growth and spontaneous involution.
  • Lack of papillomatosis and viral inclusions ruled out the diagnosis of viral wart, absence of granulomatous reaction ruled out deep fungal or mycobacterial infection and lack of cytological atypia and frank architectural abnormalities did not favour a squamous cell carcinoma.
  • Diagnosis can be challenging as differential diagnoses include pseudoepitheliomatous hyperplasia and squamous cell carcinoma.
  • [MeSH-minor] Adult. Carcinoma, Squamous Cell / diagnosis. Diagnosis, Differential. Female. Histiocytes / pathology. Humans. Keratinocytes / pathology. Keratins / analysis. Lymphocytes / pathology. Skin Neoplasms / diagnosis

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  • (PMID = 17976209.001).
  • [ISSN] 1600-0560
  • [Journal-full-title] Journal of cutaneous pathology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] J. Cutan. Pathol.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Case Reports; Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] Denmark
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Coloring Agents; 68238-35-7 / Keratins
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73. Stewart DJ: Tumor and host factors that may limit efficacy of chemotherapy in non-small cell and small cell lung cancer. Crit Rev Oncol Hematol; 2010 Sep;75(3):173-234
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  • [Title] Tumor and host factors that may limit efficacy of chemotherapy in non-small cell and small cell lung cancer.
  • While chemotherapy provides useful palliation, advanced lung cancer remains incurable since those tumors that are initially sensitive to therapy rapidly develop acquired resistance.
  • Resistance may arise from impaired drug delivery, extracellular factors, decreased drug uptake into tumor cells, increased drug efflux, drug inactivation by detoxifying factors, decreased drug activation or binding to target, altered target, increased damage repair, tolerance of damage, decreased proapoptotic factors, increased antiapoptotic factors, or altered cell cycling or transcription factors.
  • Factors for which there is now substantial clinical evidence of a link to small cell lung cancer (SCLC) resistance to chemotherapy include MRP (for platinum-based combination chemotherapy) and MDR1/P-gp (for non-platinum agents).
  • In non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC), the strongest clinical evidence is for taxane resistance with elevated expression or mutation of class III beta-tubulin (and possibly alpha tubulin), platinum resistance and expression of ERCC1 or BCRP, gemcitabine resistance and RRM1 expression, and resistance to several agents and COX-2 expression (although COX-2 inhibitors have had minimal impact on drug efficacy clinically).
  • Tumors expressing high BRCA1 may have increased resistance to platinums but increased sensitivity to taxanes.
  • Limited early clinical data suggest that chemotherapy resistance in NSCLC may also be increased with decreased expression of cyclin B1 or of Eg5, or with increased expression of ICAM, matrilysin, osteopontin, DDH, survivin, PCDGF, caveolin-1, p21WAF1/CIP1, or 14-3-3sigma, and that IGF-1R inhibitors may increase efficacy of chemotherapy, particularly in squamous cell carcinomas.
  • Equivocal data (with some positive studies but other negative studies) suggest that NSCLC tumors with some EGFR mutations may have increased sensitivity to chemotherapy, while K-ras mutations and expression of GST-pi, RB or p27kip1 may possibly confer resistance.
  • To date, resistance-modulating strategies have generally not proven clinically useful in lung cancer, although small randomized trials suggest a modest benefit of verapamil and related agents in NSCLC.

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  • [Copyright] Published by Elsevier Ireland Ltd.
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  • (PMID = 20047843.001).
  • [ISSN] 1879-0461
  • [Journal-full-title] Critical reviews in oncology/hematology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Crit. Rev. Oncol. Hematol.
  • [Language] ENG
  • [Grant] United States / NCI NIH HHS / CA / CA016672-32; United States / NCI NIH HHS / CA / P30 CA016672; United States / NCI NIH HHS / CA / 5-P30 CA16672-32; United States / NCI NIH HHS / CA / P30 CA016672-32
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural; Research Support, U.S. Gov't, Non-P.H.S.; Review
  • [Publication-country] Netherlands
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Antineoplastic Agents
  • [Other-IDs] NLM/ NIHMS168520; NLM/ PMC2888634
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74. Eichhorn W, Wehrmann M, Blessmann M, Pohlenz P, Blake F, Schmelzle R, Heiland M: Metastases in odontogenic cysts: literature review and case presentation. Oral Surg Oral Med Oral Pathol Oral Radiol Endod; 2010 Apr;109(4):582-6
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  • Malignant tumors in the oral cavity are relatively rare.
  • The vast majority of oral malignancies are primary tumors with squamous cell carcinoma being the most frequent and sarcomas occurring very seldom.
  • Secondary tumors caused by hematogenous spread arising from a tumor localized elsewhere in the body are extremely rare.
  • Metastases to the jaws are mainly caused by malignant tumors of the breast, lung, kidney, bone, and colon.
  • They occur in the late state of the disease and are regularly detected by staging examinations including scintigraphy.
  • Odontogenic cysts include dentigerous cysts, periapical or radicular cysts, and the keratocysts-nowadays declared as keratocystic odontogenic tumor.
  • [MeSH-major] Carcinoma, Ductal, Breast / pathology. Mandibular Diseases / pathology. Mandibular Neoplasms / secondary. Radicular Cyst / pathology
  • [MeSH-minor] Aged. Bone Neoplasms / secondary. Diagnosis, Differential. Disease Progression. Female. Humans. Liver Neoplasms / secondary

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  • [Copyright] Copyright 2010 Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.
  • (PMID = 20303056.001).
  • [ISSN] 1528-395X
  • [Journal-full-title] Oral surgery, oral medicine, oral pathology, oral radiology, and endodontics
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Oral Surg Oral Med Oral Pathol Oral Radiol Endod
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Case Reports; Journal Article; Review
  • [Publication-country] United States
  • [Number-of-references] 27
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75. Vilen ST, Nyberg P, Hukkanen M, Sutinen M, Ylipalosaari M, Bjartell A, Paju A, Haaparanta V, Stenman UH, Sorsa T, Salo T: Intracellular co-localization of trypsin-2 and matrix metalloprotease-9: possible proteolytic cascade of trypsin-2, MMP-9 and enterokinase in carcinoma. Exp Cell Res; 2008 Feb 15;314(4):914-26
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  • Tumor-associated trypsin-2 and matrix metalloprotease-9 (MMP-9) are associated with cancer, particularly with invasive squamous cell carcinomas.
  • We describe here that oral squamous cell carcinomas express all members of this cascade: MMP-9, trypsin-2 and enterokinase.
  • The expression of enterokinase in a carcinoma cell line not derived from the duodenum was shown here for the first time.
  • However, although both proteases were present also in various bone tumor tissues, MMP-9 and trypsin-2 never co-localized at the cellular level in these tissues.
  • This suggests that the intracellular vesicular co-localization, storage and possible activation of these proteases may be a unique feature for aggressive epithelial tumors, such as squamous cell carcinomas, but not for tumors of mesenchymal origin.
  • [MeSH-major] Carcinoma, Squamous Cell / enzymology. Enteropeptidase / metabolism. Matrix Metalloproteinase 9 / metabolism. Mouth Neoplasms / enzymology. Trypsin / metabolism. Trypsinogen / metabolism
  • [MeSH-minor] Bone Neoplasms / enzymology. Carcinoma / enzymology. Cell Line, Tumor. Enzyme Precursors / metabolism. Humans

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  • (PMID = 18062964.001).
  • [ISSN] 0014-4827
  • [Journal-full-title] Experimental cell research
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Exp. Cell Res.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
  • [Publication-country] United States
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Enzyme Precursors; 103964-84-7 / PRSS2 protein, human; 9002-08-8 / Trypsinogen; EC 3.4.21.4 / Trypsin; EC 3.4.21.9 / Enteropeptidase; EC 3.4.24.- / pro-matrix metalloproteinase 9; EC 3.4.24.35 / Matrix Metalloproteinase 9
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76. Pennathur A, Landreneau RJ, Luketich JD: Surgical aspects of the patient with high-grade dysplasia. Semin Thorac Cardiovasc Surg; 2005;17(4):326-32
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  • In 1975, about three fourths of the esophageal neoplasms were squamous cell carcinomas and the remainder were adenocarcinomas.
  • During the last 2 to 3 decades, this pattern has changed dramatically and the incidence of squamous cell carcinomas has declined while the incidence of adenocarcinomas has increased.
  • The reason for this dramatic increase is not clear, but gastro esophageal reflux disease, obesity and Barrett's esophagus have been identified as risk factors.
  • [MeSH-minor] Adenocarcinoma / pathology. Esophageal Neoplasms / pathology. Humans. Lymph Node Excision. Lymphatic Metastasis. Minimally Invasive Surgical Procedures. Quality of Life

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  • (PMID = 16428039.001).
  • [ISSN] 1043-0679
  • [Journal-full-title] Seminars in thoracic and cardiovascular surgery
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Semin. Thorac. Cardiovasc. Surg.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Review
  • [Publication-country] United States
  • [Number-of-references] 50
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77. Pesek M, Benesova L, Belsanova B, Mukensnabl P, Bruha F, Minarik M: Dominance of EGFR and insignificant KRAS mutations in prediction of tyrosine-kinase therapy for NSCLC patients stratified by tumor subtype and smoking status. Anticancer Res; 2009 Jul;29(7):2767-73
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  • [Title] Dominance of EGFR and insignificant KRAS mutations in prediction of tyrosine-kinase therapy for NSCLC patients stratified by tumor subtype and smoking status.
  • Mutations in EGFR (exon 19 and 21) and KRAS (codons 12 and 13) and their impact on response and survival with respect to tumor subtype and smoking status were assessed.
  • No EGFR effect was recorded for squamous cell tumors.
  • KRAS mutation in tumors did not result in a poorer prognosis in the subtype-selected groups, nor did it present as a negative factor in smokers.
  • KRAS does not seem an "a priori" negative factor for TKI-based treatment of NSCLC.
  • [MeSH-major] Carcinoma, Non-Small-Cell Lung / drug therapy. Genes, ras. Lung Neoplasms / drug therapy. Mutation. Protein Kinase Inhibitors / therapeutic use. Receptor, Epidermal Growth Factor / genetics. Smoking

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  • (PMID = 19596959.001).
  • [ISSN] 1791-7530
  • [Journal-full-title] Anticancer research
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Anticancer Res.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
  • [Publication-country] Greece
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Codon; 0 / DNA Primers; 0 / Protein Kinase Inhibitors; EC 2.7.10.1 / Protein-Tyrosine Kinases; EC 2.7.10.1 / Receptor, Epidermal Growth Factor
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78. Andersson S, Hellström AC, Angström T, Stendahl U, Auer G, Wallin KL: The clinicopathologic significance of laminin-5 gamma2 chain expression in cervical squamous carcinoma and adenocarcinoma. Int J Gynecol Cancer; 2005 Nov-Dec;15(6):1065-72
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  • [Title] The clinicopathologic significance of laminin-5 gamma2 chain expression in cervical squamous carcinoma and adenocarcinoma.
  • Squamous cell carcinoma predominates in the cervix uteri, while adenocarcinoma and adenosquamous carcinomas represent about 10-15% of all cervical cancers.
  • The aim of our study was to investigate the expression of the laminin-5 gamma2 chain in primary malignancies of the cervix uteri and to focus on the clinicopathologic significance of the expression of the laminin-5 gamma2 chain in cervical squamous carcinoma and adenocarcinoma with respect to age and survival of the patients.
  • The study consisted of a total of 89 cases of invasive cervical cancer (54 squamous carcinomas and 35 adenocarcinomas).
  • The laminin-5 gamma2 chain was found in 80% of all the squamous carcinoma and in 66% of cervical adenocarcinoma.
  • The univariate analysis in squamous cell carcinoma showed that factors such as the stage of the disease and positive lymph nodes had an impact on the survival of the patients, whereas in the multivariate analysis, only age at diagnosis was an independent prognostic factor.
  • However, in cases with cervical adenocarcinoma, only the stage of the disease was an independent prognostic factor.
  • There was no difference between HPV-positive and HPV-negative tumors concerning the high expression of laminin-5 gamma2 chain.
  • Our results indicate that the majority of the primary cervical tumors, especially squamous cell carcinoma, showed expression of laminin-5 gamma2 chain immunoreactivity.
  • Independent prognostic values for the survival of the patients were age and stage of the disease.
  • [MeSH-major] Adenocarcinoma / metabolism. Carcinoma, Squamous Cell / metabolism. Laminin / biosynthesis. Uterine Cervical Neoplasms / metabolism
  • [MeSH-minor] Age Factors. Female. Humans. Neoplasm Staging. Prognosis. Survival Analysis

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  • (PMID = 16343183.001).
  • [ISSN] 1048-891X
  • [Journal-full-title] International journal of gynecological cancer : official journal of the International Gynecological Cancer Society
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Int. J. Gynecol. Cancer
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
  • [Publication-country] United States
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / LAMC2 protein, human; 0 / Laminin
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79. Fujishiro M, Yahagi N, Kakushima N, Kodashima S, Muraki Y, Ono S, Yamamichi N, Tateishi A, Shimizu Y, Oka M, Ogura K, Kawabe T, Ichinose M, Omata M: Endoscopic submucosal dissection of esophageal squamous cell neoplasms. Clin Gastroenterol Hepatol; 2006 Jun;4(6):688-94
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  • [Title] Endoscopic submucosal dissection of esophageal squamous cell neoplasms.
  • BACKGROUND & AIMS: Endoscopic submucosal dissection (ESD) has recently been developed for en bloc resection of stomach neoplasms, which results in high tumor eradication rates as well as a modality for the precise histologic assessment of the entire lesion.
  • Application of the technique is desirable for esophageal squamous cell neoplasms (SCNs), but there have been no reports on the use of this procedure in the esophagus.
  • METHODS: An ESD with methods similar to those used for resections of early gastric cancer was performed on 58 consecutive esophageal SCNs with preoperative diagnoses of intraepithelial neoplasm or intramucosal invasive carcinoma occurring in 43 enrolled patients.
  • RESULTS: The rate of en bloc resection was 100% (58/58), and en bloc resection with tumor-free lateral/basal margins (R0 resection) was 78% (45/58).
  • Of 40 lesions occurring in 31 patients fulfilling the criteria of node-negative tumors (mean follow-up, 17 months), 1 lesion resected by en bloc resection with nonevaluable tumor-free lateral margins (Rx [lateral] resection) recurred locally 6 months after ESD, which was treated successfully by a second ESD procedure.
  • [MeSH-major] Esophageal Neoplasms / surgery. Esophagoscopy. Neoplasms, Squamous Cell / surgery

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  • (PMID = 16713746.001).
  • [ISSN] 1542-3565
  • [Journal-full-title] Clinical gastroenterology and hepatology : the official clinical practice journal of the American Gastroenterological Association
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Clin. Gastroenterol. Hepatol.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] United States
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Coloring Agents; 9679TC07X4 / Iodine
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80. Srivastava A, Ghosh A, Saha S, Saha VP, Chakraborty D: Sarcomas of head and neck - A 10 yrs experience. Indian J Otolaryngol Head Neck Surg; 2007 Dec;59(4):322-6
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  • Compared to other types of head and neck neoplasms, such as squamous cell carcinoma, soft tissue sarcomas have low rates of regional metastases.
  • Surgery generally has been recommended as the primary method of treatment for achieving local control, except in those high-grade tumours arising in sites not amenable to resection.

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  • (PMID = 23120465.001).
  • [ISSN] 2231-3796
  • [Journal-full-title] Indian journal of otolaryngology and head and neck surgery : official publication of the Association of Otolaryngologists of India
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Indian J Otolaryngol Head Neck Surg
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] India
  • [Other-IDs] NLM/ PMC3452262
  • [Keywords] NOTNLM ; CT Scan / Chemoradiation / Excisional Biopsy / Prognostic factors / Soft tissue sarcoma / Survival rate
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81. Krüger-Corcoran D, Stockfleth E, Jürgensen JS, Maltusch A, Nindl I, Sterry W, Lange-Asschenfeldt B, Ulrich C: [Human papillomavirus-associated warts in organ transplant recipients. Incidence, risk factors, management]. Hautarzt; 2010 Mar;61(3):220-9
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  • Human papillomaviruses infect the squamous epithelia of the skin and cause warts, and are occasionally found in squamous cell carcinomas.
  • Since cell-mediated immunity plays a crucial role in the control of HPV-infections, organ transplant recipients, unable to mount an adequate T-helper 1 cell-mediated immune surveillance, frequently develop widespread and resistant induced warts.
  • Skin tumors, especially squamous cell carcinomas, are the most common post-transplantation neoplasm.
  • Warts, actinic keratoses and invasive squamous cell carcinomas are known to develop at the same time in the areas.
  • The role of HPV in the development of invasive squamous cell carcinoma under immunosuppression, remains to be elucidated in respect to common risk factors and increased numbers of warts potentially identifying patients at increased risk for carcinoma.
  • The presence of more than 10 verrucae was associated with the development of actinic keratoses, invasive squamous cell carcinoma and basal cell carcinoma.
  • [MeSH-major] Carcinoma, Squamous Cell / epidemiology. Organ Transplantation / statistics & numerical data. Papillomaviridae. Postoperative Complications / epidemiology. Skin Neoplasms / epidemiology. Warts / epidemiology

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  • (PMID = 20165825.001).
  • [ISSN] 1432-1173
  • [Journal-full-title] Der Hautarzt; Zeitschrift für Dermatologie, Venerologie, und verwandte Gebiete
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Hautarzt
  • [Language] ger
  • [Publication-type] English Abstract; Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] Germany
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82. Pajor A, Stańczyk R, Durko T: [Malignant neoplasms of external and middle ear]. Otolaryngol Pol; 2005;59(2):251-6
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  • [Title] [Malignant neoplasms of external and middle ear].
  • [Transliterated title] Nowotwory złośliwe ucha zewnetrznego i środkowego.
  • INTRODUCTION: Neoplasms of external and middle ear are rare, which cause several problems in diagnosis and therapy.
  • The purpose of the study was to analyze retrospectively patients with malignant neoplasms of the ear.
  • METHODOLOGY: The study was carried out on 53 patients treated for malignant ear neoplasms in single institution during 25 years (1978-2002).
  • RESULTS: The most frequent neoplasm was squamous cell carcinoma--36 cases (67.9%), then basal cell carcinoma--9 cases (16.9%).
  • Neoplasm primarily involved auricle in 26 patients (49.1%), external auditory canal in 15 patients (28.3%) and middle ear in 12 patients (22.6%).
  • The characteristics of neoplasms related to the site of location were described.
  • The difficulties in precise histopathologic diagnosis and extent of disease were pointed out.
  • RESULTS: Neoplasms of external and middle ear constitute a group of various histopathological and clinical tumours, which differ in diagnostic difficulties, treatment and prognosis.
  • A diagnosis was often made in advanced stages of neoplasms, especially for middle ear tumours, that diminished a possibility of effective treatment.
  • [MeSH-major] Ear Neoplasms / pathology. Ear, External. Ear, Middle
  • [MeSH-minor] Adult. Aged. Aged, 80 and over. Carcinoma, Basal Cell / pathology. Carcinoma, Basal Cell / therapy. Carcinoma, Squamous Cell / pathology. Carcinoma, Squamous Cell / therapy. Diagnosis, Differential. Female. Humans. Male. Middle Aged. Neoplasm Staging. Ossicular Prosthesis. Retrospective Studies

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  • (PMID = 16095097.001).
  • [ISSN] 0030-6657
  • [Journal-full-title] Otolaryngologia polska = The Polish otolaryngology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Otolaryngol Pol
  • [Language] pol
  • [Publication-type] English Abstract; Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] Poland
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83. García-Morales I, Pérez-Gil A, Camacho FM: [Marjolin's ulcer: burn scar carcinoma]. Actas Dermosifiliogr; 2006 Oct;97(8):529-32
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  • [Transliterated title] Ulcera de Marjolin: carcinoma sobre cicatriz por quemadura.
  • The most frequently produced neoplasm is squamous cell carcinoma.
  • We present the case of a 48-year-old male with squamous cell carcinoma on the old burn scar of legs that evolved favorably after excision.
  • [MeSH-major] Burns / complications. Carcinoma, Squamous Cell / etiology. Cicatrix / complications. Neoplasms, Post-Traumatic. Skin Neoplasms / etiology. Skin Ulcer / etiology

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  • (PMID = 17067533.001).
  • [ISSN] 0001-7310
  • [Journal-full-title] Actas dermo-sifiliográficas
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Actas Dermosifiliogr
  • [Language] spa
  • [Publication-type] Case Reports; English Abstract; Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] Spain
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84. Rodrigo JP, Cabanillas R, Chiara MD, García Pedrero J, Florentino Fresno M, Suárez Nieto C: [Molecular alterations in nodal metastases and its primary tumors in squamous cell carcinomas of the larynx]. Acta Otorrinolaringol Esp; 2008 Mar;59(3):114-9
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  • [Title] [Molecular alterations in nodal metastases and its primary tumors in squamous cell carcinomas of the larynx].
  • [Transliterated title] Alteraciones moleculares en las metástasis ganglionares y sus tumores primarios en los carcinomas epidermoides de laringe.
  • INTRODUCTION AND OBJECTIVES: The successive acquisition of molecular alterations determines tumour progression.
  • During this progression, the development of nodal metastases is one of the most important prognostic factors in laryngeal squamous cell carcinomas.
  • The aim of this study is to analyze if, in these carcinomas, the molecular alterations in the nodal metastases are different from those present in the primary tumour.
  • MATERIAL AND METHOD: Paired samples of primary tumour and nodal metastases from 51 patients with squamous cell carcinoma of the supraglottic larynx were studied.
  • RESULTS: A close correlation in the expression of the proteins studied was observed in the nodal metastases and the corresponding primary tumour, with the exception of HIF-1a expression and the degree of vascularization.
  • CONCLUSIONS: Most of the molecular alterations in the nodal metastases are already present in the primary tumour, suggesting that these alterations are early events in carcinogenesis.
  • [MeSH-major] Carcinoma, Squamous Cell / secondary. Laryngeal Neoplasms / pathology
  • [MeSH-minor] Humans. Immunohistochemistry. Lymphatic Metastasis. Neoplasm Proteins / biosynthesis

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  • (PMID = 18364203.001).
  • [ISSN] 0001-6519
  • [Journal-full-title] Acta otorrinolaringológica española
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Acta Otorrinolaringol Esp
  • [Language] spa
  • [Publication-type] English Abstract; Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] Spain
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Neoplasm Proteins
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85. Fujishiro M, Kodashima S, Goto O, Ono S, Niimi K, Yamamichi N, Oka M, Ichinose M, Omata M: Endoscopic submucosal dissection for esophageal squamous cell neoplasms. Dig Endosc; 2009 Apr;21(2):109-15
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  • [Title] Endoscopic submucosal dissection for esophageal squamous cell neoplasms.
  • The final goal to perform ESD is not to resect the lesion in an en bloc fashion, but to save the patient from esophageal cancer-related death.
  • Thus, the indications should be considered based on the entire patient, not just the target lesion itself, and pre-, peri- and postoperative management of the patient is also very important, as well as technical aspects of ESD.
  • We believe that ESD will become a standard treatment for early esophageal cancer not only in Japan but also worldwide in the near future.
  • [MeSH-major] Carcinoma in Situ / surgery. Endoscopy / methods. Esophageal Neoplasms / surgery. Neoplasms, Squamous Cell / surgery

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  • (PMID = 19691785.001).
  • [ISSN] 1443-1661
  • [Journal-full-title] Digestive endoscopy : official journal of the Japan Gastroenterological Endoscopy Society
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Dig Endosc
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] Australia
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86. National Toxicology Program: Toxicology studies of trimethylolpropane triacrylate (technical grade) (CAS No. 15625-89-5) in F344/N rats, B6C3F1 mice, and genetically modified (FVB Tg.AC hemizygous) mice (dermal studies). Natl Toxicol Program Genet Modif Model Rep; 2005 Oct;(3):1-195
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  • Male and female F344/N rats and B6C3F(1) mice were administered technical grade trimethylolpropane triacrylate (it is reactive and therefore not available as pure trimethylolpropane triacrylate) in acetone dermally for 2 weeks or 3 months.
  • Dosed rats had irritation at the site of application; this clinical finding was most commonly seen in rats administered 50 mg/kg or greater.
  • Squamous cell neoplasms at the site of application were associated with dermal application of trimethylolpropane triacrylate.
  • At 6 months, the incidences of squamous cell papilloma were significantly increased in 6 and 12 mg/kg males and females.
  • One female in each of the 1.5, 6, and 12 mg/kg groups also had squamous cell carcinoma.
  • The incidence of squamous cell papilloma of the forestomach in 12 mg/kg females was significantly greater than that in the vehicle control group.
  • The local lymph node assay indicated no significant increase in lymph node cell proliferation in mice administered trimethylolpropane triacrylate compared to that in the vehicle controls.
  • Treatment-related squamous cell carcinomas occurred at the site of application in dosed female mice.
  • Increased incidences of forestomach squamous cell papilloma in female mice may have been related to chemical administration.
  • [MeSH-major] Acrylates / toxicity. Carcinogens / toxicity. Papilloma / chemically induced. Skin Neoplasms / chemically induced. Stomach Neoplasms / chemically induced

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  • (PMID = 18784763.001).
  • [ISSN] 1556-5246
  • [Journal-full-title] National Toxicology Program genetically modified model report
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Natl Toxicol Program Genet Modif Model Rep
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] United States
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Acrylates; 0 / Carcinogens; 4B67KGL96S / trimethylolpropane triacrylate
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87. Orrock JM, Abbott JJ, Gibson LE, Folpe AL: INI1 and GLUT-1 expression in epithelioid sarcoma and its cutaneous neoplastic and nonneoplastic mimics. Am J Dermatopathol; 2009 Apr;31(2):152-6
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  • The morphological features of epithelioid sarcoma may closely mimic those of epithelial neoplasms, such as squamous cell carcinoma, mesenchymal tumors, such as benign fibrous histiocytoma, and nonneoplastic lesions, such as granuloma annulare.
  • Recently, loss of expression of INI1, a tumor suppressor gene/protein, and expression of GLUT-1, a glucose transporter protein, have been described in epithelioid sarcoma.
  • Twenty-four cases of epithelioid sarcoma, 13 cases of granuloma annulare, 10 cases of rheumatoid nodule, 19 cases of cutaneous squamous cell carcinoma, 7 cases of atypical fibroxanthoma, 9 cases of benign fibrous histiocytoma (dermatofibroma), and 3 cases of nodular fasciitis were immunostained for GLUT-1 and INI1 using commercially available antibodies, heat-induced epitope retrieval, and the Dako Envision detection system.
  • GLUT-1 was positive in 40%-50% of epithelioid sarcomas, all cases of granuloma annulare and rheumatoid nodules, 67% of benign fibrous histiocytomas, and in all squamous cell carcinomas.
  • In this clinical context, loss of INI1 expression seems to be an entirely specific marker of epithelioid sarcoma and this finding may be of great value in distinguishing CD34-negative epithelioid sarcoma from squamous cell carcinoma and in the distinction of rare cytokeratin-negative epithelioid sarcomas from necrobiotic processes, nodular fasciitis, and benign fibrous histiocytomas.
  • In contrast, there does not seem to be a role for GLUT-1 immunohistochemistry in this differential diagnosis.
  • [MeSH-major] Chromosomal Proteins, Non-Histone / metabolism. DNA-Binding Proteins / metabolism. Glucose Transporter Type 1 / metabolism. Granuloma Annulare / metabolism. Sarcoma / metabolism. Skin Diseases / metabolism. Skin Neoplasms / metabolism. Transcription Factors / metabolism
  • [MeSH-minor] Biomarkers / metabolism. Diagnosis, Differential. Fasciitis / metabolism. Fasciitis / pathology. Histiocytoma, Benign Fibrous / metabolism. Histiocytoma, Benign Fibrous / pathology. Humans. Neoplasms, Squamous Cell / metabolism. Neoplasms, Squamous Cell / pathology. Rheumatoid Nodule / metabolism. Rheumatoid Nodule / pathology. Xanthomatosis / metabolism. Xanthomatosis / pathology

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  • (PMID = 19318800.001).
  • [ISSN] 1533-0311
  • [Journal-full-title] The American Journal of dermatopathology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Am J Dermatopathol
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] United States
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Biomarkers; 0 / Chromosomal Proteins, Non-Histone; 0 / DNA-Binding Proteins; 0 / Glucose Transporter Type 1; 0 / SMARCB1 protein, human; 0 / Transcription Factors
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88. Avilés-Izquierdo JA, Velázquez-Tarjuelo D, Lecona-Echevarría M, Lázaro-Ochaita P: [Dermoscopic features of eccrine poroma]. Actas Dermosifiliogr; 2009 Mar;100(2):133-6
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  • Eccrine poroma is a benign adnexal neoplasm that clinically may mimic malignant skin tumors such as squamous cell carcinoma and amelanotic melanoma.
  • Dermoscopy can improve the clinical diagnosis of this benign adnexal skin tumor.
  • [MeSH-major] Acrospiroma / pathology. Dermoscopy. Foot Diseases / pathology. Sweat Gland Neoplasms / pathology
  • [MeSH-minor] Aged. Aged, 80 and over. Buttocks. Diagnosis, Differential. Female. Humans. Skin Neoplasms / diagnosis

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  • (PMID = 19445878.001).
  • [ISSN] 0001-7310
  • [Journal-full-title] Actas dermo-sifiliográficas
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Actas Dermosifiliogr
  • [Language] spa
  • [Publication-type] Case Reports; English Abstract; Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] Spain
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89. National Toxicology Program: Toxicology and carcinogenesis studies of sodium dichromate dihydrate (Cas No. 7789-12-0) in F344/N rats and B6C3F1 mice (drinking water studies). Natl Toxicol Program Tech Rep Ser; 2008 Jul;(546):1-192
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  • Exposure to sodium dichromate dihydrate resulted in the development of neoplasms of the squamous epithelium that lines the oral mucosa and tongue.
  • The incidences of squamous cell carcinoma in the oral mucosa of 516 mg/L male and female rats were significantly greater than those in the controls.
  • The incidences of squamous cell papilloma or squamous cell carcinoma (combined) of the oral mucosa or tongue of 516 mg/L male and female rats were significantly greater than those in the controls.
  • These included histiocytic cellular infiltration, chronic inflammation, fatty change (females), basophilic focus (males), and clear cell focus (females).
  • The incidences of neoplasms of the small intestine (duodenum, jejunum, or ileum) were increased in exposed groups of male and female mice.
  • CONCLUSIONS: Under the conditions of these 2-year drinking water studies, there was clear evidence of carcinogenic activity of sodium dichromate dihydrate in male and female F344/N rats based on increased incidences of squamous cell neoplasms of the oral cavity.
  • There was clear evidence of carcinogenic activity of sodium dichromate dihydrate in male and female B6C3F1 mice based on increased incidences of neoplasms of the small intestine (duodenum, jejunum, or ileum).
  • [MeSH-major] Chromates / toxicity. Neoplasms, Experimental / etiology. Toxicity Tests. Water Pollutants, Chemical / toxicity
  • [MeSH-minor] Administration, Oral. Animals. Female. Intestinal Neoplasms / chemically induced. Intestinal Neoplasms / pathology. Intestine, Small / drug effects. Intestine, Small / pathology. Liver / drug effects. Liver / pathology. Lymph Nodes / drug effects. Lymph Nodes / pathology. Male. Mice. Mice, Inbred Strains. Mouth Neoplasms / chemically induced. Mouth Neoplasms / pathology. Rats. Rats, Inbred F344. Water Supply

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  • (PMID = 18716633.001).
  • [ISSN] 0888-8051
  • [Journal-full-title] National Toxicology Program technical report series
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Natl Toxicol Program Tech Rep Ser
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Technical Report
  • [Publication-country] United States
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Chromates; 0 / Water Pollutants, Chemical; C9G6VY6ZZ4 / sodium bichromate
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90. Pfeifer GP, Rauch TA: DNA methylation patterns in lung carcinomas. Semin Cancer Biol; 2009 Jun;19(3):181-7
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  • The genome of epithelial tumors is characterized by numerous chromosomal aberrations, DNA base sequence changes, and epigenetic abnormalities.
  • In squamous cell carcinomas of the lung, CpG methylation patterns undergo substantial changes relative to normal lung epithelium.
  • Interestingly, a large fraction (almost 80%) of the tumor-specifically methylated sequences are targets of the Polycomb complex in embryonic stem cells.
  • Homeobox genes are particularly overrepresented and all four HOX gene loci on chromosomes 2, 7, 12, and 17 are hotspots for tumor-associated methylation because of the presence of multiple methylated CpG islands within these loci.
  • DNA hypomethylation at CpGs in squamous cell tumors preferentially affects repetitive sequence classes including SINEs, LINEs, subtelomeric repeats, and segmental duplications.
  • Since these epigenetic changes are found in early stage tumors, their contribution to tumor etiology as well as their potential usefulness as diagnostic or prognostic biomarkers of the disease should be considered.

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  • (PMID = 19429482.001).
  • [ISSN] 1096-3650
  • [Journal-full-title] Seminars in cancer biology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Semin. Cancer Biol.
  • [Language] ENG
  • [Grant] United States / NCI NIH HHS / CA / R01 CA084469; None / None / / R21 CA128495-02; United States / NCI NIH HHS / CA / CA084469; United States / NCI NIH HHS / CA / R01 CA084469-09; United States / NCI NIH HHS / CA / CA128495; None / None / / R01 CA084469-09; United States / NCI NIH HHS / CA / R21 CA128495-02; United States / NCI NIH HHS / CA / R21 CA128495
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural; Review
  • [Publication-country] England
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Biomarkers, Tumor; 0 / Polycomb-Group Proteins; 0 / Repressor Proteins
  • [Number-of-references] 85
  • [Other-IDs] NLM/ NIHMS96703; NLM/ PMC2680753
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91. Li T, Wen H, Brayton C, Das P, Smithson LA, Fauq A, Fan X, Crain BJ, Price DL, Golde TE, Eberhart CG, Wong PC: Epidermal growth factor receptor and notch pathways participate in the tumor suppressor function of gamma-secretase. J Biol Chem; 2007 Nov 2;282(44):32264-73
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  • [Title] Epidermal growth factor receptor and notch pathways participate in the tumor suppressor function of gamma-secretase.
  • Gamma-secretase, a unique aspartyl protease, is required for the regulated intramembrane proteolysis of Notch and APP, pathways that are implicated, respectively, in the pathogenesis of cancer and Alzheimer disease.
  • However, the mechanism whereby reduction of gamma-secretase causes tumors such as squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) remains poorly understood.
  • Here, we demonstrate that gamma-secretase functions in epithelia as a tumor suppressor in an enzyme activity-dependent manner.
  • Supporting this notion is our finding that the proliferative response of fibroblasts lacking gamma-secretase activity is more sensitive when challenged by either EGF or an inhibitor of EGFR as ompared with wild type cells.
  • Collectively, our results establish a novel mechanism linking the EGFR pathway to the tumor suppressor role of gamma-secretase and that mice with genetic reduction of gamma-secretase represent an excellent rodent model for clarifying pathogenesis of SCC and for testing therapeutic strategy to ameliorate this type of human cancer.
  • [MeSH-major] Amyloid Precursor Protein Secretases / metabolism. Membrane Glycoproteins / metabolism. Receptor, Epidermal Growth Factor / metabolism. Receptors, Notch / metabolism. Signal Transduction. Skin Neoplasms / metabolism
  • [MeSH-minor] Animals. Cell Line. Crosses, Genetic. Cytosol / metabolism. Down-Regulation. Genes, Tumor Suppressor. Humans. Mice. Mice, Inbred C57BL. beta Catenin / metabolism

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  • (PMID = 17827153.001).
  • [ISSN] 0021-9258
  • [Journal-full-title] The Journal of biological chemistry
  • [ISO-abbreviation] J. Biol. Chem.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Grant] United States / NINDS NIH HHS / NS / P01 NS047308; United States / NIA NIH HHS / AG / P50 AG05146; United States / NINDS NIH HHS / NS / R01 NS45150
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
  • [Publication-country] United States
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Membrane Glycoproteins; 0 / Receptors, Notch; 0 / beta Catenin; 0 / nicastrin protein; EC 2.7.10.1 / Receptor, Epidermal Growth Factor; EC 3.4.- / Amyloid Precursor Protein Secretases
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92. Wilson MK, Granger EK, Preda VA: Pulmonary hypertension due to isolated metastatic squamous cell carcinoma thromboemboli. Heart Lung Circ; 2006 Apr;15(2):143-5
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  • [Title] Pulmonary hypertension due to isolated metastatic squamous cell carcinoma thromboemboli.
  • The differential diagnosis of pulmonary hypertension due to arterial tumour embolism is often overlooked and deserves contemplation.
  • This resulted in the surprising definitive diagnosis of thromboembolic pulmonary hypertension secondary to laminated thrombi of metastatic squamous cell tumour emboli.
  • The site of tumour origin was however not histologically apparent and was unable to be elucidated on extensive further investigation.
  • [MeSH-major] Arterial Occlusive Diseases / diagnosis. Hypertension, Pulmonary / diagnosis. Neoplasms, Squamous Cell / diagnosis. Pulmonary Embolism / diagnosis. Thromboembolism / diagnosis


93. Kiseleva VI, Krikunova LI, Liubina LV, Beziaeva GP, Panarina LV, Iurochkina NI, Kuevda DA, Shipulina OIu, Saenko AS: [Infection with high-risk human papillomavirus and prognosis of cervical carcinoma]. Vopr Onkol; 2010;56(2):185-90
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  • Real-time polymerase chain reaction procedure was used to evaluate bioptic tumor samples from patients suffering cervical carcinoma (CC) stages I-IV.
  • Relapse frequency and mortality rates in patients with tumors associated with one of viruses 31.33, 35, 39, 52, 58 or 59 were higher as compared with HPV type 16--associated cases 2 years (p=0.03) or 3 years on (p=0.11), respectively.
  • A similar trend was established for squamous-cell tumors stages 1 and 2 (p=0.07) (p=0.12), respectively.
  • [MeSH-major] Alphapapillomavirus / isolation & purification. Papillomavirus Infections / complications. Tumor Virus Infections / complications. Uterine Cervical Neoplasms / virology

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  • (PMID = 20552895.001).
  • [ISSN] 0507-3758
  • [Journal-full-title] Voprosy onkologii
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Vopr Onkol
  • [Language] rus
  • [Publication-type] English Abstract; Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] Russia (Federation)
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / DNA, Viral
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94. Lo WC, Ting LL, Ko JY, Lou PJ, Yang TL, Chang YL, Wang CP: Malignancies of the ear in irradiated patients of nasopharyngeal carcinoma. Laryngoscope; 2008 Dec;118(12):2151-5
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  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • RESULTS: Ten tumors were squamous cell carcinoma and one tumor was chondrosarcoma occurring within the radiation field of previous treatment for NPC.
  • Six tumors were located in the external auditory canal, two in the middle ear cavity, two in the periauricular region and one in the mastoid cavity.
  • The 3-year disease-free and overall survival rates were 30.3% and 20%, respectively.
  • [MeSH-major] Carcinoma, Squamous Cell / etiology. Chondrosarcoma / etiology. Ear Neoplasms / etiology. Nasopharyngeal Neoplasms / radiotherapy. Neoplasms, Radiation-Induced / etiology. Neoplasms, Second Primary / etiology
  • [MeSH-minor] Adult. Aged. Aged, 80 and over. Combined Modality Therapy. Disease-Free Survival. Female. Follow-Up Studies. Humans. Male. Middle Aged. Neoplasm Staging. Radiotherapy Dosage. Radiotherapy, Adjuvant. Retrospective Studies

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  • (PMID = 18948828.001).
  • [ISSN] 1531-4995
  • [Journal-full-title] The Laryngoscope
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Laryngoscope
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] United States
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95. Yakut T, Schulten HJ, Demir A, Frank D, Danner B, Egeli U, Gebitekin C, Kahler E, Gunawan B, Urer N, Oztürk H, Füzesi L: Assessment of molecular events in squamous and non-squamous cell lung carcinoma. Lung Cancer; 2006 Dec;54(3):293-301
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  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] Assessment of molecular events in squamous and non-squamous cell lung carcinoma.
  • Although considerable knowledge exists on the tumor biology of lung cancer, there is still a need to assess molecular events for the clinical management of the disease.
  • We studied the pattern of chromosomal imbalances in 45 non-small cell lung carcinomas (NSCLC) by comparative genomic hybridization (CGH) and correlated the results with clinicopathological features including immunohistochemical (IHC) expression of the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR).
  • Twenty-one tumors were squamous cell carcinomas (SCC) and 24 non-squamous cell lung carcinomas (NSCC) comprising 9 adenocarcinomas (ADC), 9 large cell carcinomas (LCC), 4 sarcomatoid carcinomas and 2 adenosquamous carcinomas.
  • In addition, +12p correlated significantly with disease progress with the exception of nodal involvement in NSCC as well as with disease progress, regardless of nodal involvement, in the entire series.
  • [MeSH-major] Carcinoma / genetics. Carcinoma, Squamous Cell / genetics. Genomic Instability. Lung Neoplasms / genetics


96. Shestakova T, Zhuravel E, Bolgova L, Alekseenko O, Soldatkina M, Pogrebnoy P: Expression of human beta-defensins-1, 2 and 4 mRNA in human lung tumor tissue: a pilot study. Exp Oncol; 2008 Jun;30(2):153-6
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  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] Expression of human beta-defensins-1, 2 and 4 mRNA in human lung tumor tissue: a pilot study.
  • AIM: To analyze the patterns of human beta-defensin-1, 2, 4 (hBDs) expression in human lung tumors.
  • MATERIALS AND METHODS: Tissue samples of surgically resected human lung tumors (squamous cell carcinoma (SCC), n=10; adenocarcinoma (AC), n=10) paired with conditionally normal tissue samples were analyzed for expression of hBD-1, 2, 4 mRNA by semiquantitative RT-PCR.
  • No correlation was detected between the levels of hBD-1, hBD-2 and hBD-4 mRNA and histological type, differentiation grade of the tumor, and the stage of the disease, as well as the content of hBD-2 peptide in blood serum of lung cancer patients.
  • CONCLUSION: Human beta-defensins-1 and -2 are often up-regulated in human lung tumors.
  • [MeSH-major] Gene Expression Regulation, Neoplastic. Lung Neoplasms / metabolism. Up-Regulation. beta-Defensins / biosynthesis
  • [MeSH-minor] Cell Line, Tumor. Cohort Studies. Humans. Pilot Projects. RNA, Messenger / metabolism. Reverse Transcriptase Polymerase Chain Reaction. Tissue Distribution

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