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Items 1 to 100 of about 296834
1. Tanaka F, Yoneda K, Hasegawa S: Circulating tumor cells (CTCs) in lung cancer: current status and future perspectives. Lung Cancer (Auckl); 2010;1:77-84

  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] Circulating tumor cells (CTCs) in lung cancer: current status and future perspectives.
  • Circulating tumor cells (CTCs) are tumor cells that are shed from the primary site and circulate in the peripheral blood, and recent studies have shown that CTCs can be useful clinical markers in some solid tumors such as those of breast cancer.

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  • (PMID = 28210108.001).
  • [Journal-full-title] Lung Cancer (Auckland, N.Z.)
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Lung Cancer (Auckl)
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Review
  • [Publication-country] New Zealand
  • [Keywords] NOTNLM ; CTC-chip / cellsearch / metastasis / tumor cells
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2. Terada T: Endometriosis of the Vermiform Appendix Presenting as a Tumor. Gastroenterology Res; 2009 Dec;2(6):353-355
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  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] Endometriosis of the Vermiform Appendix Presenting as a Tumor.
  • Most patients with this disease are asymptomatic or present as acute or chronic appendicitis.
  • The author herein reports a case of appendiceal endometriosis presenting as a tumor at the appendiceal oriffice.
  • A colon endoscopy showed a tumor in the appendiceal orifice.
  • Two biopsies of the tumor showed no remarkable changes.
  • Imaging modalities including CT and MRI also revealed an appendiceal tumor.
  • Resection of appendix, cecum, ascending colon, terminal ileum, and 16 lymph nodes were performed under the clinical diagnosis of gastrointestinal stromal tumor.
  • Grossly, a tumor measuring 3 x 3 x 3 cm was recognized in the appendiceral orifice.
  • Histologically, the tumor was endometriosis consisting of islands of endometrial glands and stroma.
  • The present case suggests that appendiceal endometriosis may present as a tumor.

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  • (PMID = 27990206.001).
  • [ISSN] 1918-2805
  • [Journal-full-title] Gastroenterology research
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Gastroenterology Res
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] Canada
  • [Keywords] NOTNLM ; Appendix / Endometriosis / Lymph nodes
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3. Jurisic V, Colic S, Jurisic M: The Inflammatory Radicular Cysts Have Higher Concentration of TNF-α in Comparison to Odontogenic Keratocysts (Odontogenic Tumour). Acta Medica (Hradec Kralove); 2007;50(4):233-238

  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] The Inflammatory Radicular Cysts Have Higher Concentration of TNF-α in Comparison to Odontogenic Keratocysts (Odontogenic Tumour).
  • TNF-α is a pleiotropic cytokine that is considered as a primary modifier of inflammatory and immune reaction in response to various inflammatory diseases and tumour.
  • We investigated levels of TNF-α in 43 radicular cysts and 15 odontogenic keratocysts, obtained from patients undergoing surgery, under local anaesthesia, and after aspiration of cystic fluid from non-ruptured cysts.
  • TNF-α is elevated in both cysts' fluid, but higher values were found in radicular cysts in comparison to keratocysts.
  • The significantly higher concentration of TNF-α was associated with smaller radicular cysts, higher protein concentration, higher presence of inflammatory cells in peri cystic tissues, and the degree of vascularisation and cysts wall thickness (Mann-Whitney U-test, p<0.05).
  • No correlation was found based on these parameters in odontogenic keratocyst, but all cysts have detectable concentrations of TNF-α.

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  • (PMID = 28745277.001).
  • [ISSN] 1211-4286
  • [Journal-full-title] Acta medica (Hradec Kralove)
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Acta Medica (Hradec Kralove)
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] Czech Republic
  • [Keywords] NOTNLM ; Cyst size / Hystology / Odontogenic tumour / Radicular cysts / Surgery / TNF
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4. Ayerra AQ, Mena EP, Fabregas JP, Miguelez CG, Guedea F: HDR and LDR Brachytherapy in the Treatment of Lip Cancer: the Experience of the Catalan Institute of Oncology. J Contemp Brachytherapy; 2010 Mar;2(1):9-13

  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] HDR and LDR Brachytherapy in the Treatment of Lip Cancer: the Experience of the Catalan Institute of Oncology.
  • RESULTS: The most common cell type was squamous cell carcinoma (115 cases; 95%) and most tumors were located on the lower lip (107 patients; 88.4%).
  • After 15 years of follow-up, overall survival was 89.5%, cause-specific survival 97.8%, and disease-free survival 86.6%.

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  • (PMID = 28031737.001).
  • [ISSN] 1689-832X
  • [Journal-full-title] Journal of contemporary brachytherapy
  • [ISO-abbreviation] J Contemp Brachytherapy
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] Poland
  • [Keywords] NOTNLM ; brachytherapy / lip cancer / radiotherapy dosage
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5. King GD, Kroeger KM, Bresee CJ, Candolfi M, Liu C, Manalo CM, Muhammad AG, Pechnick RN, Lowenstein PR, Castro MG: Flt3L in Combination With HSV1-TK-mediated Gene Therapy Reverses Brain Tumor-induced Behavioral Deficits. Mol Ther; 2008 Apr;16(4):682-690

  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] Flt3L in Combination With HSV1-TK-mediated Gene Therapy Reverses Brain Tumor-induced Behavioral Deficits.
  • : Glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) is an invasive and aggressive primary brain tumor which is associated with a dismal prognosis.
  • We hypothesized that the growth of a large intracranial tumor mass would cause behavioral abnormalities that can be reversed by the combined gene therapy.
  • We assessed the behavior and neuropathology of tumor-bearing animals treated with the combined gene therapy, 3 days after treatment, in long-term survivors, and in a recurrent model of glioma.

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  • [Copyright] Copyright © 2008 The American Society of Gene Therapy. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.
  • (PMID = 28178463.001).
  • [ISSN] 1525-0024
  • [Journal-full-title] Molecular therapy : the journal of the American Society of Gene Therapy
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Mol. Ther.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] United States
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6. Haroon M, Kwong WY, Cantwell B, Walker F: A case of cetuximab-related tumour lysis syndrome in metastatic rectal carcinoma. NDT Plus; 2010 Jun;3(3):271-272

  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] A case of cetuximab-related tumour lysis syndrome in metastatic rectal carcinoma.
  • He had the first session of a combined therapy with cetuximab and 5-fluorouracil (5-FU) in March 2009; however, soon afterwards, he presented with the symptoms, signs and biochemistry suggestive of tumour lysis syndrome.
  • Our unusual case highlights that tumour lysis syndrome can also develop in 'low risk' category tumours, and that clinicians should be vigilant in identifying at-risk patients.

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  • (PMID = 28657052.001).
  • [ISSN] 1753-0784
  • [Journal-full-title] NDT plus
  • [ISO-abbreviation] NDT Plus
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] England
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7. Sharma U, Jagannathan NR: Biochemical characterization of breast tumors by in vivo and in vitro magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS). Biophys Rev; 2009 Mar;1(1):21

  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] Biochemical characterization of breast tumors by in vivo and in vitro magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS).
  • In vivo MRS studies have documented the presence of choline containing compounds (tCho) as a reliable biochemical marker of malignancy and also useful for monitoring the tumor response to therapy.
  • Further, ex vivo and in vitro MRS studies of intact tissues and tissue extracts provided several metabolites that were not be detected in vivo and provided insight into underlying biochemistry of the disease processes.

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  • (PMID = 28510152.001).
  • [ISSN] 1867-2450
  • [Journal-full-title] Biophysical reviews
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Biophys Rev
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Review
  • [Publication-country] Germany
  • [Keywords] NOTNLM ; Breast cancer, Choline, Biomarker / Ex vivo / In vitro / In vivo / Magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS) / Therapeutic response
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8. Feigl GC, Bundschuh O, Gharabaghi A, Samii M, Horstmann GA: Volume reduction in meningiomas after gamma knife surgery. J Neurosurg; 2005 Jan;102(s_supplement):189-194

  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • The management strategy reduces tumor volume with surgery when necessary (81 patients).
  • Stereotactic GKS with a Gamma Knife model C was performed in all tumors of suitable size.
  • Magnetic resonance imaging follow-up examinations with volumetric tumor analysis was performed 6 months after treatment and annually thereafter.
  • The mean tumor volume was 5.9 cm<sup>3</sup> (range < 5 to > 40 cm<sup>3</sup>).
  • A reduction in volume occurred in 117 (82.4%) of all tumors, and in 20 tumors (14.1%) growth ceased.
  • The overall tumor control rate of 96.4%.
  • Only five tumors (3.5%) showed a volume increase.

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  • (PMID = 28306469.001).
  • [ISSN] 1933-0693
  • [Journal-full-title] Journal of neurosurgery
  • [ISO-abbreviation] J. Neurosurg.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] United States
  • [Keywords] NOTNLM ; gamma knife / meningioma / radiosurgery / tumor control / volume reduction
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9. Bell E: Starting out - Patients remember how and where they receive 'bad news'. Nurs Stand; 2006 Mar 22;20(28):27

  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • A 91-year-old woman was attending the oncology clinic.
  • She had been diagnosed with a large brain tumour and was offered radiotherapy to shrink the tumour, and palliative care.

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  • (PMID = 27978291.001).
  • [ISSN] 2047-9018
  • [Journal-full-title] Nursing standard (Royal College of Nursing (Great Britain) : 1987)
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Nurs Stand
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] England
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10. Nicolo' M, Piccolino FC, Ghiglione D, Nicol G, Calabria G: Multiple bilateral choroidal metastatic tumors from a small-cell neuroendocrine carcinoma. Eur J Ophthalmol; 2005 Jan - Feb 2005;15(1):149-152

  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] Multiple bilateral choroidal metastatic tumors from a small-cell neuroendocrine carcinoma.
  • PURPOSE: To report one case of multiple and bilateral choroidal tumors from a poorly differentiated small cell neuroendocrine carcinoma of unknown primary.
  • METHODS: The case of a 30-years-old white female who developed multiple and bilateral choroidal tumors from a poorly differentiated small cell neuroendocrine carcinoma of unknown primary is presented.
  • RESULTS: The patient had a disseminated disease and died 6 months after.
  • The oncologic work-up, including physical examination, laboratory and radiographic study, fails to identiy the primary site.

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  • (PMID = 28221420.001).
  • [ISSN] 1724-6016
  • [Journal-full-title] European journal of ophthalmology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Eur J Ophthalmol
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] Italy
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11. Szeifert GT, Salmon I, Rorive S, Massager N, Devriendt D, Simon S, Brotchi J, Levivier M: Does gamma knife surgery stimulate cellular immune response to metastatic brain tumors? A histopathological and immunohistochemical study. J Neurosurg; 2005 Jan;102(s_supplement):180-184

  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] Does gamma knife surgery stimulate cellular immune response to metastatic brain tumors? A histopathological and immunohistochemical study.
  • OBJECT: The aim of this study was to analyze the cellular immune response and histopathological changes in secondary brain tumors after gamma knife surgery (GKS).
  • Seven patients underwent subsequent craniotomy for tumor removal between 1 and 33 months after GKS.
  • Four of these patients had one tumor, two patients had two tumors, and one patient had three.
  • In addition to routine H & E and Mallory trichrome staining, immunohistochemical reactions were conducted to characterize the phenotypic nature of the cell population contributing to the tissue immune response to neoplastic deposits after radiosurgery.
  • Light microscopy revealed an intensive lymphocytic infiltration in the parenchyma and stroma of tumor samples obtained in patients in whom surgery was performed over 6 months after GKS.
  • Contrary to this, extensive areas of tissue necrosis with either an absent or scanty lymphoid population were observed in the poorly controlled neoplastic specimens obtained in cases in which surgery was undertaken in patients less than 6 months after GKS.
  • CONCLUSIONS: Histopathological findings of the present study are consistent with a cellular immune response of natural killer cells against metastatic brain tumors, presumably stimulated by the ionizing energy of focused radiation.

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  • (PMID = 28306478.001).
  • [ISSN] 1933-0693
  • [Journal-full-title] Journal of neurosurgery
  • [ISO-abbreviation] J. Neurosurg.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] United States
  • [Keywords] NOTNLM ; T-cell lymphocyte / gamma knife surgery / metastases
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12. Darling MR, Jackson-Boeters L, Daley TD, Diamandis EP: [Human kallikrein 13 expression in salivary gland tumors]. Int J Biol Markers; 2006 Apr-Jun;21(2):106-110

  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] [Human kallikrein 13 expression in salivary gland tumors].
  • Petraki et al have previously described presence of hK13 in salivary gland tissue, localized to duct epithelia and some acinar cells.
  • The aim of this study was to determine whether hK13 is expressed in salivary gland tissues and salivary gland tumors (both benign and malignant), in order to compare normal with tumor tissues.
  • The results of this study indicate that most salivary gland tumors show high levels of expression of hK13.
  • Ductal cells and cells lining duct-like structures showed a higher intensity of staining than non-ductal cells in most tumors.
  • Tumors which exhibited only non-ductal cells also exhibited cytoplasmic staining.
  • In conclusion, we demonstrate the high expression of hK13 in several common salivary gland tumors.

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  • (PMID = 28207129.001).
  • [ISSN] 1724-6008
  • [Journal-full-title] The International journal of biological markers
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Int. J. Biol. Markers
  • [Language] ita
  • [Publication-type] English Abstract; Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] Italy
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13. Pan L, Wang EM, Zhang N, Zhou LF, Wang BJ, Dong YF, Dai JZ, Cai PW: Long-term results of Leksell gamma knife surgery for trigeminal schwannomas. J Neurosurg; 2005 Jan;102(s_supplement):220-224

  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • The mean target volume was 8.7 cm<sup>3</sup> (range 0.8-33 cm<sup>3</sup>); the mean maximum dose was 27 Gy (range 20-40 Gy); the mean tumor margin dose was 13.3 Gy (range 10-15 Gy); and the mean follow-up period was 68 months (range 27-114 months).
  • Disappearance of the tumor occurred in seven patients.
  • An obvious decrease in tumor volume was observed in 41 patients, four tumors remained unchanged, and four tumors progressed at 5, 26, 30, and 60 months, respectively.
  • One patient with disease progression died of tumor progression at 36 months after GKS.
  • The tumor growth control rate in this group was 93% (52 of 56 cases).
  • Four patients experienced mild symptom deterioration related to tumor progression.
  • Some larger tumors are also suitable for radiosurgery if there is no significant brainstem compression.

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  • (PMID = 28306474.001).
  • [ISSN] 1933-0693
  • [Journal-full-title] Journal of neurosurgery
  • [ISO-abbreviation] J. Neurosurg.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] United States
  • [Keywords] NOTNLM ; gamma knife surgery / schwannoma / trigeminal nerve
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14. Chino K, Silvain D, Grace A, Stubbs J, Stea B: Feasibility and safety of outpatient brachytherapy in 37 patients with brain tumors using the GliaSite&lt;sup&gt;®&lt;/sup&gt; Radiation Therapy System. Med Phys; 2008 Jul;35(7Part1):3383-3388

  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] Feasibility and safety of outpatient brachytherapy in 37 patients with brain tumors using the GliaSite<sup>®</sup> Radiation Therapy System.
  • Temporary, low dose rate brachytherapy to the margins of resected brain tumors, using a balloon catheter system (GliaSite<sup>®</sup> Radiation Therapy System) and liquid I-125 radiation source (Iotrex™), began in 2002 at the University of Arizona Medical Center.
  • Of the 37 patients monitored, 26 patients were treated for recurrent glioblastoma multiforme (GBM), six for primary GBM, and five for metastatic brain tumors.

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  • [Copyright] © 2008 American Association of Physicists in Medicine.
  • (PMID = 28513009.001).
  • [ISSN] 2473-4209
  • [Journal-full-title] Medical physics
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Med Phys
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] United States
  • [Keywords] NOTNLM ; Brachytherapy / Brain / Cancer / Dosimetry / Dosimetry/exposure assessment / Neuroscience / Non-ionizing radiation equipment and techniques / Radiation safety / Radiation therapy / Radiation treatment / Radioactivity / Skin / Therapeutic applications, including brachytherapy / Therapeutics / brachytherapy / brain / catheters / dosimetry / patient care / patient diagnosis / patient monitoring / tumours
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15. Amendola BE, Wolf A, Coy SR, Amendola MA, Eber D: Pineal tumors: analysis of treatment results in 20 patients. J Neurosurg; 2005 Jan;102(s_supplement):175-179

  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] Pineal tumors: analysis of treatment results in 20 patients.
  • OBJECT: The authors evaluate their results when using gamma knife surgery (GKS) in the management of patients with tumors in the pineal region.
  • METHODS: This is a retrospective clinical evaluation of 20 patients with primary tumors of the pineal region treated with GKS from November 1994 through August 2003.
  • There were 13 germ cell tumors, two pineoblastomas, two low-grade gliomas, one primitive neuroectodermal tumor, one teratoma, and one pineocytoma.
  • Three patients died: one of unrelated causes, one who presented with extensive local disease, and the other of meningeal carcinomatosis with local control of the primary tumor.
  • CONCLUSIONS: This initial experience suggests that GKS is a valuable treatment modality for the management of pineal region tumors.
  • This technique offers excellent local tumor control and minimal patient morbidity, allowing for immediate use of systemic chemotherapy and/or conventional radiation if indicated.

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  • (PMID = 28306462.001).
  • [ISSN] 1933-0693
  • [Journal-full-title] Journal of neurosurgery
  • [ISO-abbreviation] J. Neurosurg.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] United States
  • [Keywords] NOTNLM ; gamma knife surgery / glioma / pineal tumor / pineoblastoma / pineocytoma / primitive neuroectodermal tumor / teratoma
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16. Khalil M, Wulfkuhle J, Fillmore H, Deng J, Liotta L, Petricoin E 3rd, Watson J, Broaddus W: Functional pathway mapping of human glioblastoma multiforme and brain metastases for patient tailored therapy. J Clin Oncol; 2009 May 20;27(15_suppl):2076

  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • : 2076 Background: Genome scanning analysis of human glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) has suggested that this form of cancer is a protein pathway disease.
  • METHODS: Twelve tumors were included in this study: 10 GBMs (9 primary, 1 recurrent) and two brain metastases (1 breast and 1 lung).
  • Pure tumor cell populations were obtained from fixed frozen tissue sections using Laser Capture Microdissection.
  • RESULTS: Unsupervised hierarchical clustering of all tumors in the study set revealed largely patient-specific signaling portraits yet also identified distinct pathway subsets.
  • The two metastatic tumors clustered separately and distinctly from the GBMs.
  • Since certain pathway biomarkers are themselves being targeted by current investigational therapies, the ability to map pathway activation and identify critical pathway biomarkers can lead to targeted therapeutics tailored to each patient's tumor.

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  • (PMID = 27964379.001).
  • [ISSN] 1527-7755
  • [Journal-full-title] Journal of clinical oncology : official journal of the American Society of Clinical Oncology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] J. Clin. Oncol.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] United States
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17. Rollins-Raval M, Byler Dann R, Edwards RP, Chivukula M: Clinical outcome in patients with endometrial papillary serous and endometrioid carcinomas as related to WT-1, Pax-2, and p16 immunohistochemical expression profiles. J Clin Oncol; 2009 May 20;27(15_suppl):e16547

  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • Both of these tumors often present with solid growth pattern with few papillary features.
  • These differences were found despite the same preoperative and postoperative radiotherapy and chemotherapy, indicating more aggressive tumor biology.
  • To date, there are no well defined immunophenotypic or molecular methods to differentiate these two tumors or their clinical behavior.
  • The three patients with the strongly staining PAX-2 EPS tumors all had varying tumor characteristics, recurrence and adjuvant therapies.
  • This finding is now being evaluated in the additional cases.
  • Strong Pax-2 staining in three cases of EPS with better outcome is an interesting finding that deserves further investigation.

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  • (PMID = 27960817.001).
  • [ISSN] 1527-7755
  • [Journal-full-title] Journal of clinical oncology : official journal of the American Society of Clinical Oncology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] J. Clin. Oncol.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] United States
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18. Gribbin TE, Senzer N, Raizer JJ, Shen S, Nabors LB, Wiranowska M, Fiveash JB: A phase I evaluation of intravenous (IV) &lt;sup&gt;131&lt;/sup&gt;I-chlorotoxin delivery to solid peripheral and intracranial tumors. J Clin Oncol; 2009 May 20;27(15_suppl):e14507

  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] A phase I evaluation of intravenous (IV) <sup>131</sup>I-chlorotoxin delivery to solid peripheral and intracranial tumors.
  • : e14507 Background: Pre-clinical studies demonstrate TM601 binding to glioblastoma, melanoma, and other tumor types in vitro and in vivo (human xenograft tumors in mice).
  • Here we report imaging and safety data from a Phase I clinical trial in patients with recurrent metastatic somatic and/or cerebral solid tumors that received IV <sup>131</sup>I-TM601.
  • Subjects not showing tumor localization, received a second imaging test dose of 20 mC/0.4mg <sup>131</sup>I-TM601.
  • Subjects without localization at either dose were dropped from study; patients showing tumor localization without toxicity then received a 30 mCi/0.6mg <sup>131</sup>I-TM601 IV injection.
  • 31/44 (70%) showed tumor specific uptake on follow-up gamma camera or SPECT imaging.
  • Tumor-specific uptake was observed in patients with malignant glioma (7/8), metastatic melanoma (7/7), non-small cell lung cancer (3/4), colon cancer (6/7), pancreatic cancer (2/3), prostate cancer (2/2), breast cancer (1/4) and in one evaluable patient each with transitional cell carcinoma, pleomorphic xanthoastrocytoma and metastatic paraganglioma.
  • Notably, all patients with metastatic cerebral disease showed tumor-specific uptake of systemically injected <sup>131</sup>I-TM601.
  • CONCLUSIONS: Tumor-specific uptake of IV <sup>131</sup>I-TM601 in primary and metastatic (including brain) solid tumors suggests that further dose escalation is warranted.

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  • (PMID = 27963538.001).
  • [ISSN] 1527-7755
  • [Journal-full-title] Journal of clinical oncology : official journal of the American Society of Clinical Oncology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] J. Clin. Oncol.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] United States
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19. Okuma-Yoshioka C, Seto H, Kadono Y, Hikita A, Oshima Y, Kurosawa H, Nakamura K, Tanaka S: Tumor necrosis factor-α inhibits chondrogenic differentiation of synovial fibroblasts through p38 mitogen activating protein kinase pathways. Mod Rheumatol; 2008 Aug;18(4):366-378

  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] Tumor necrosis factor-α inhibits chondrogenic differentiation of synovial fibroblasts through p38 mitogen activating protein kinase pathways.
  • The aim of this study was to clarify the effect and signaling pathways of tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α on the chondrogenic differentiation of SFs.

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  • (PMID = 28925826.001).
  • [ISSN] 1439-7609
  • [Journal-full-title] Modern rheumatology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Mod Rheumatol
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] United States
  • [Keywords] NOTNLM ; Chondrogenic differentiation / Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) / Synovial fibroblast-like cell (SFs) / TNF-α / p38 MAPK
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20. Macarulla T, Rodríguez-Braun E, Tabernero J, Roselló S, Baselga J, Lee Y, Manfredi M, Liu H, Fingert H, Cervantes A: Phase I pharmacokinetic (PK) and pharmacodynamic (PD) study of the selective aurora A kinase (AAK) inhibitor MLN8054 in patients (pts) with advanced solid tumors. J Clin Oncol; 2009 May 20;27(15_suppl):2578

  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] Phase I pharmacokinetic (PK) and pharmacodynamic (PD) study of the selective aurora A kinase (AAK) inhibitor MLN8054 in patients (pts) with advanced solid tumors.
  • : 2578 Background: MLN8054, a first-generation, selective AAK inhibitor, induces chromosome alignment and segregation defects during mitosis, leading to cell death (Hoar et al, MolCellBio 2007;27:4513).
  • This phase I trial examined the safety, PK, and PD of MLN8054 administered orally to adult pts with advanced solid tumors.
  • Benzodiazepine-like adverse effects (somnolence) associated with chemical structure and presumably unrelated to AAK inhibition were observed with QD dosing in another Phase 1 study (Dees et al, EJC Suppl 2008;6[12]:91), so subsequent cohorts in this trial were treated with 25, 35, 45, 55, 60, 70, and 80 mg/d in four divided doses (QID) on d1-14, with the largest dose at night.
  • Dose escalation stopped at 80 mg/d due to DLTs including G3 somnolence (n=1) and G3 transaminitis (n=1).
  • In PD analyses, MLN8054 at higher doses increased mitotic count in skin and tumor biopsies and reduced chromosome alignment and spindle bipolarity in the mitotic cells in tumor biopsies, outcomes consistent with AAK inhibition.
  • Stable disease (range 4-9 cycles) was observed in 3 pts (colorectal, non-small cell lung, and melanoma).

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  • (PMID = 27961890.001).
  • [ISSN] 1527-7755
  • [Journal-full-title] Journal of clinical oncology : official journal of the American Society of Clinical Oncology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] J. Clin. Oncol.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Grant] United States / NCI NIH HHS / CA / P30 CA008748
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] United States
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21. Olmos D, Allred A, Sharma R, Brunetto A, Smith D, Murray S, Barker D, Taegtmeyer A, de Bono J, Blagden S: Phase I first-in-human study of the polo-like kinase-1 selective inhibitor, GSK461364, in patients with advanced solid tumors. J Clin Oncol; 2009 May 20;27(15_suppl):3536

  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] Phase I first-in-human study of the polo-like kinase-1 selective inhibitor, GSK461364, in patients with advanced solid tumors.
  • : 3536 Background: Polo-like kinase-1 (Plk1), part of a family of highly conserved serine-threonine kinases, has multiple roles in mitotic progression, is over-expressed and also associated with poor prognosis in some tumor types.
  • METHODS: Adult patients (pts) with relapsed/refractory advanced solid tumors with performance status of 0-2 and adequate organ function were eligible.
  • Secondary objectives included preliminary evaluation of anti-tumor activity.
  • Phospho-histone H3, a marker of mitotic arrest, was detected, in circulating tumor cells, 24 hrs after first dose.
  • Stable disease >5m has been observed in 2 esophageal cancer pts.

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  • (PMID = 27961338.001).
  • [ISSN] 1527-7755
  • [Journal-full-title] Journal of clinical oncology : official journal of the American Society of Clinical Oncology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] J. Clin. Oncol.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] United States
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22. Taillibert S, Vincent LA, Granger B, Marie Y, Carpentier C, Guillevin R, Bellanger A, Psimaras D, Sanson M, Delattre J: Bevacizumab and irinotecan for recurrent oligodendroglial tumors. J Clin Oncol; 2009 May 20;27(15_suppl):2054

  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] Bevacizumab and irinotecan for recurrent oligodendroglial tumors.
  • : 2054 Background: Treatment with a regimen of bevacizumab/irinotecan has been shown to be effective in recurrent grade 3 and 4 gliomas, but the effect of this regimen against recurrent oligodendroglial tumors has not been specifically studied.
  • METHODS: The bevacizumab/irinotecan regimen was retrospectively evaluated in a consecutive series of 25 patients with recurrent oligodendroglial tumors.
  • Among the 17 patients in whom the status of the main molecular alterations of gliomas could be evaluated (search for deletions of chromosomes 1p, 19q, 9p, 10q, and amplification of EGFR, MDM2, CDK4), no relation could be found between the response rate and the type of genetic change (including 1p-19q co-deletion).

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  • (PMID = 27964672.001).
  • [ISSN] 1527-7755
  • [Journal-full-title] Journal of clinical oncology : official journal of the American Society of Clinical Oncology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] J. Clin. Oncol.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] United States
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23. Shuhang W, Bai H, Zhao J, Duan CJ, Yang L, Wu NM, Wang JZ, Wang YY, Zhuo LM, Zhuo LM, Wang J: Consistency between K-ras mutation in peripheral blood and matched tumor tissues detected by PCR-RFLP in Chinese patients with advanced NSCLC and its clinical significance analysis. J Clin Oncol; 2009 May 20;27(15_suppl):8090

  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] Consistency between K-ras mutation in peripheral blood and matched tumor tissues detected by PCR-RFLP in Chinese patients with advanced NSCLC and its clinical significance analysis.
  • : 8090 Background: To explore the consistency between K-ras mutation in peripheral blood and matched tumor tissues detected by PCR-RFLP and analyze the prognostic effects of K-ras mutation in peripheral blood in Chinese NSCLC patients (pts) treated by epidermal growth factor receptor-tyrosine kinase inhibitors (EGFR-TKIs).
  • METHODS: Plasma free DNA and matched tumor samples were collected from 264 hospitalized pts in Department of Thoracic Oncology, Peking University School of Oncology between Jan 2005 and Feb 2008.
  • We compared the mutations in plasma samples and matched tumor tissues which determined an association between K-ras mutation status and clinical outcomes.
  • RESULTS: In 264 pts, K-ras mutation rates in codon 12 and 13 of exons 1 in peripheral blood were 11.36% (30/264) and 0.75% (2/264), also 9.84% (26/264) and 1.13% (3/264) in matched tumor tissues, respectively.
  • CONCLUSIONS: There is a high consistency of K-ras mutation rate between plasma DNA and matched tumor tissues.

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  • (PMID = 27962667.001).
  • [ISSN] 1527-7755
  • [Journal-full-title] Journal of clinical oncology : official journal of the American Society of Clinical Oncology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] J. Clin. Oncol.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] United States
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24. Norden AD, Raizer JJ, Lamborn KR, Abrey LE, Chang SM, Gilbert MR, Cloughesy TF, Prados MD, Lieberman F, Wen P: Phase II trials of erlotinib or gefitinib in patients with recurrent meningiomas. J Clin Oncol; 2009 May 20;27(15_suppl):2062

  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • The epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) is often over-expressed in meningiomas and may promote tumor growth.
  • In open label, single arm phase II studies of the EGFR inhibitors gefitinib (NABTC 00-01) and erlotinib (NABTC 01-03) for recurrent malignant gliomas, we included exploratory subsets of recurrent meningioma patients.
  • METHODS: Patients with recurrent histologically confirmed meningiomas and no more than two previous chemotherapy regimens were treated with gefitinib 500 mg/day or erlotinib 150 mg/day until tumor progression or unacceptable toxicity.
  • Eight patients (32%) had benign tumors, 9 (36%) atypical, and eight (32%) malignant.
  • For benign tumors, the 6-month progression-free survival (PFS6) was 29%, 12-month PFS (PFS12) 0%, 6-month overall survival (OS6) 63%, and 12-month OS (OS12) 50%.
  • For atypical/malignant tumors, PFS6 was 25%, PFS12 19%, OS6 81%, and OS12 68%.
  • Of 21 evaluable patients, there were no responses; eight patients (38%) had stable disease, and 13 (62%) had progressive disease.

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  • (PMID = 27964693.001).
  • [ISSN] 1527-7755
  • [Journal-full-title] Journal of clinical oncology : official journal of the American Society of Clinical Oncology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] J. Clin. Oncol.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] United States
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25. Broom RJ, Amir E, Cawthorn T, Freedman O, Gianfelice D, Barth D, Galica J, Wang D, Done SJ, Clemons M: Gene expression differences between disseminated tumor cells and tumor cells from overt bone metastases in patients with metastatic breast cancer. J Clin Oncol; 2009 May 20;27(15_suppl):1040

  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] Gene expression differences between disseminated tumor cells and tumor cells from overt bone metastases in patients with metastatic breast cancer.
  • : 1040 Background: Despite extensive work evaluating molecular differences between primary tumors, circulating tumor cells, disseminated tumor cells (DTCs) and established metastases, it is not apparent which genetic alterations are required to form viable, independent bone metastases (BM).
  • METHODS: Ten breast cancer patients with BM underwent a CT-guided BM biopsy and a bone marrow aspiration (for DTCs).
  • Tumor cells were enriched by immunomagnetic separation and RNA was extracted from each sample.
  • Ingenuity Pathway Analysis software was used to identify genes integral to specific pathways involved in tumor dissemination.
  • RESULTS: The yield of analyzable malignant cells from BM and bone marrow aspirates was 60% and 80%, respectively.

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  • (PMID = 27961118.001).
  • [ISSN] 1527-7755
  • [Journal-full-title] Journal of clinical oncology : official journal of the American Society of Clinical Oncology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] J. Clin. Oncol.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] United States
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26. Knoblauch RE, Thompson CB: Targeting tumor metabolism: biguanides as anti-neoplastic agents. J Clin Oncol; 2009 May 20;27(15_suppl):e14592

  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] Targeting tumor metabolism: biguanides as anti-neoplastic agents.
  • : e14592 Background: During the process of malignant transformation, the tumor cell adopts a new form of metabolism, characterized by aerobic glycolysis and altered TCA cycle flux, that enable it to meet the energetic and biosynthetic demands of proliferation.
  • METHODS: We have characterized the proliferative and metabolic effects of phenformin, a member of the biguanide family of compounds used in the treatment of diabetes, on the bcr-abl expressing K562 erythroleukemia cell line, and compared the resulting phenotype to those of imatinib and rapamycin, two targeted agents used in the treatment of malignant disease.
  • RESULTS: Phenformin induced the most profound growth inhibition of K562 cells, in a manner distinct from the targeted agents.
  • In contrast, the growth arrest resulting from imatinib treatment was associated with a complete reversion from the anabolic phenotype, as demonstrated by dramatically decreased glucose and glutamine consumption.
  • CONCLUSIONS: Our results confirm the importance of metabolism to the proliferation of malignant cells, thereby validating anabolic metabolism's potential for therapeutic intervention.
  • The direct inhibition of tumor cell metabolism by phenformin warrants further clinical study as a promising new approach to cancer therapy.

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  • (PMID = 27963742.001).
  • [ISSN] 1527-7755
  • [Journal-full-title] Journal of clinical oncology : official journal of the American Society of Clinical Oncology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] J. Clin. Oncol.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] United States
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27. Phillips P, Yalcin M, Cui H, Abdel-Nabi HH, Sajjad M, Bernacki R, Mousa S: Effects of novel heparin-derived compounds on tumor uptake of chemotherapeutics and chemoresponse. J Clin Oncol; 2009 May 20;27(15_suppl):2537

  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] Effects of novel heparin-derived compounds on tumor uptake of chemotherapeutics and chemoresponse.
  • : 2537 Thrombotic complications are the second most common cause of mortality in cancer patients and fibrin deposition in the tumor microenvironment might play a key role in tumor progression and inference with tumor chemotherapeutic uptake.
  • Treatments that target these processes may result in improved uptake of chemotherapeutic agents and subsequent inhibition of tumor growth and metastasis.
  • Tissue Factor (TF) is frequently associated with aggressive behavior and poor outcome in tumors.
  • We have previously demonstrated potent anti-tumor efficacy for various mechanisms that interfere with TF/VIIa.
  • The purpose of this study was to investigate the effects of low molecular weight heparins (LMWH) and sulfated non-anticoagulant LMWH (S-NACH) on tumor chemotherapeutic uptake. STUDIES:.
  • (1) Nude mice xenograft A549 human lung carcinoma: LMWH or S-NACH at 10 mg/kg S.C. daily effectively limited tumor growth. (2) LCC6 human lung tumor xenograft model: Paclitaxel alone or in combination with Tinzaparin or S-NACH on tumor re-growth after discontinuation of treatment: Paclitaxel + S-NACH treatment showed significant (P<0.01) tumor growth suppression and improved survival when compared to Paclitaxel. (3) Biodistribution studies: animals were injected with LMWH S.C. daily for 5 days (10 mg/kg) then injected i.v. with [<sup>124</sup>-I]-Paclitaxel.
  • LMWH increased [<sup>124</sup>-I]-Paclitaxel uptake into LCC6 tumors with tumor: muscle ratios several fold greater than that of [<sup>124-</sup>I]-Paclitaxel alone at 24 hrs post injection.
  • This is a highly significant result in the light of the fact that the FDA criterion for a clinically meaningful effect is a 15% increase in uptake. (4) HPLC studies of tumor uptake of Doxorubicin (DOX in mice treated with 10 mg/kg of LMWH or S-NACH for 10 days followed by Doxorubicin (2.5 mg/kg).
  • Both LMWH and S-NACH significantly (P<0.01) increased the uptake of chemotherapeutic agent DOX in MCF7 DOX resistant tumors by 1.5-2 folds but not in heart or lung tissues, confirming the findings obtained with another agent [<sup>124</sup>-I]-Paclitaxel.
  • Protocols utilizing adjuvant or neo-adjuvant therapy with LMWH or S-NACH could lead to increase tumor chemo responsiveness and overcoming tumor chemo resistance.

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  • (PMID = 27961851.001).
  • [ISSN] 1527-7755
  • [Journal-full-title] Journal of clinical oncology : official journal of the American Society of Clinical Oncology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] J. Clin. Oncol.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] United States
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28. Magnan HD, Chou T, LaQuaglia MP, Gerald W, Ladanyi M, Merchant MS: Elevated expression of VEGFR-2 and VEGFA in desmoplastic small round cell tumor (DSRCT) and activity of bevacizumab and irinotecan in a xenograft model of DSRCT. J Clin Oncol; 2009 May 20;27(15_suppl):10016

  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] Elevated expression of VEGFR-2 and VEGFA in desmoplastic small round cell tumor (DSRCT) and activity of bevacizumab and irinotecan in a xenograft model of DSRCT.
  • : 10016 Background: Desmoplastic small round cell tumor (DSRCT) is an aggressive tumor with poor response to multimodality therapies.
  • METHODS: RNA was extracted from frozen tumor samples (DSRCT, alveolar soft part sarcoma, alveolar rhabdomyosarcoma, synovial sarcoma, and Ewing sarcoma) and a human DSRCT cell line, JN-DSRCT.
  • A primary tumor developed within 8 - 12 weeks with concomitant development of abdominal metastases.
  • Mice were treated during primary tumor growth with bevacizumab (5ug/kg IP weekly), irinotecan (2.5mg/kg IP ×10 days q3 weeks), or a combination of both.
  • RESULTS: Microarray data demonstrated an average of 4.5 times higher RNA expression of VEGFR-2 (KDR) in DSRCT tumor samples as compared to the other translocation-associated sarcomas (p = 3.6 E-12).
  • VEGFA was also highly overexpressed in the DSRCT line and tumor samples when compared to the other translocation-associated sarcomas (2.5 times, p = 1.1E-10).
  • Xenografts treated with bevacizumab had slowed growth over 100 days compared to control groups (volume of 0.52 mm3 vs 1.52, p = 0.002).
  • Taken together, the expression data and the sustained response of DSRCT xenografts to bevacizumab suggest that VEGF-dependent angiogenesis is important for DSRCT tumor biology and represents an attractive target for therapy.

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  • (PMID = 27962501.001).
  • [ISSN] 1527-7755
  • [Journal-full-title] Journal of clinical oncology : official journal of the American Society of Clinical Oncology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] J. Clin. Oncol.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] United States
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29. Geoerger B, Hargrave D, Thomas F, Andreiuolo F, Varlet P, Frappaz D, Doz F, Riccardi R, Jaspan T, Vassal G, European Innovative Therapies for Children with Cancer (ITCC) Consortium: Pharmacokinetic and biological study of erlotinib in children as monotherapy for refractory brain tumors or with radiation for newly diagnosed brain stem gliomas. J Clin Oncol; 2009 May 20;27(15_suppl):10019

  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] Pharmacokinetic and biological study of erlotinib in children as monotherapy for refractory brain tumors or with radiation for newly diagnosed brain stem gliomas.
  • METHODS: Group 1 included patients with brain tumors refractory to or relapsing after conventional therapy; receiving erlotinib alone.
  • In Group 1, 8 patients (27.6%) had stable disease, 2 with 45% tumor regression.
  • Biomarker analyses on archived tumor or biopsy tissue prior to study entry for newly diagnosed brain stem glioma found 18/37 tumors tested were EGFR IHC+; 16/37 and 23/36 were pAKT+ and pMAPK+, respectively.
  • CONCLUSIONS: Erlotinib 125 mg/m<sup>2</sup>/day has an acceptable tolerability profile in pediatric patients with brain tumors, and can be safely combined with RT.
  • Further studies are required to define the efficacy of this treatment approach and to establish the impact of biomarkers on outcomes in pediatric glial tumors.

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  • (PMID = 27962504.001).
  • [ISSN] 1527-7755
  • [Journal-full-title] Journal of clinical oncology : official journal of the American Society of Clinical Oncology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] J. Clin. Oncol.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] United States
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30. French AJ, Sinicrope F, Foster NR, Thibodeau SN, Sargent DJ, O'Connell MJ: Model-based prediction of defective DNA mismatch repair using clinicopathological variables in stage II and III colon cancers. J Clin Oncol; 2009 May 20;27(15_suppl):11093

  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • MMR status in tumors had been analyzed by MSI (using mono- and dinucleotide markers) or by immunohistochemistry for MMR proteins (hMLH1 and hMSH2).
  • Logistic regression and a recursive partitioning and amalgamation (RPA) analysis was used to identify important predictive factors of MMR status.
  • Factors explored included age, gender, histologic grade, tumor site, stage, lymph node metastases, and T-stage.
  • Tumor site was the most important predictor of MMR status followed by histologic grade.
  • Distal tumors had a low likelihood of defective MMR (3% rate overall; 13/468), whereas proximal tumors had a greater likelihood of defective MMR (26%; 130/506).
  • For patients with proximal tumors, the addition of histologic grade and gender increased the prediction of defective MMR ( Table ).
  • Using tumor site, histologic grade, and gender, the logistic regression model showed excellent discrimination (c- statistic = 0.81).
  • CONCLUSIONS: Tumor site is an important predictor of defective MMR that is rare in distal and increased in proximal tumors.

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  • (PMID = 27963121.001).
  • [ISSN] 1527-7755
  • [Journal-full-title] Journal of clinical oncology : official journal of the American Society of Clinical Oncology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] J. Clin. Oncol.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] United States
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31. Ninan JA, Bailey H, Kolesar J, Marnocha R, Eickhoff J, Wright J, Espinoza-Delgado I, Alberti D, Wilding G, Schelman W: A phase I study of vorinostat in combination with bortezomib in refractory solid tumors. J Clin Oncol; 2009 May 20;27(15_suppl):2531

  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] A phase I study of vorinostat in combination with bortezomib in refractory solid tumors.
  • : 2531 Background: Vorinostat (suberoylanilide hydroxamic acid, SAHA) is an oral histone deacytlase (HDAC) inhibitor that has anti-tumor activity in hematologic malignancies and advanced solid tumors.
  • Tumor types include: Prostate (1), Colorectal (3), Pancreatic (6), Sarcoma (7), Biliary (1), Thymus (1), GIST (2), Mesothelioma (1), ovarian (1), Neuroendocrine (1), Lung (1), Head and Neck (1), Breast (2), and Cervical (1).
  • Subjective evidence of clinical activity has been observed in patients with refractory solid tumors.

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  • (PMID = 27961857.001).
  • [ISSN] 1527-7755
  • [Journal-full-title] Journal of clinical oncology : official journal of the American Society of Clinical Oncology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] J. Clin. Oncol.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] United States
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32. Kosmas C, Mylonakis N, Tsakonas G, Vorgias G, Pantelis N, Politis P, Kalinoglou N, Tsavaris N, Akrivos T, Karabelis A: Paclitaxel (T), ifosfamide (I), and carboplatin (Cb) (TICb) combination chemotherapy in advanced uterine and adnexal malignant mixed mullerian tumors (MMMTs). J Clin Oncol; 2009 May 20;27(15_suppl):5517

  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] Paclitaxel (T), ifosfamide (I), and carboplatin (Cb) (TICb) combination chemotherapy in advanced uterine and adnexal malignant mixed mullerian tumors (MMMTs).
  • : 5517 Background: Malignant mixed mullerian tumors (MMMTs) of the uterus and adnexa represent aggressive gynecologic malignancies with a high rate of locoregional and distant failure.
  • Prior treatment for locoregional disease included Sx: 23, Sx+RT: 9.
  • Disease sites at diagnosis included: pelvic disease 12; pelvic/paraortic lymph nodes 14; peritoneal implants 16; liver 4; lung nodules 9; bone metastases 1; malignant pleural effusion 4.
  • Responses were as follows: 21/32 (66%) evaluable patients responded, with 9 complete responses (CR) and 12 partial responses (PR), while 8 had stable disease (SD), and 3 developed progressive disease (PD).

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  • (PMID = 27962459.001).
  • [ISSN] 1527-7755
  • [Journal-full-title] Journal of clinical oncology : official journal of the American Society of Clinical Oncology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] J. Clin. Oncol.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] United States
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33. Dennie T, Alberti D, Oliver K, LoConte N, Mulkerin D, Wilding G, Holen K, Fleming R, Bowen C, O'Neill V: A phase I study of capecitabine, oxaliplatin (CapOx), and lapatinib (L) in metastatic or advanced solid tumors. J Clin Oncol; 2009 May 20;27(15_suppl):2579

  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] A phase I study of capecitabine, oxaliplatin (CapOx), and lapatinib (L) in metastatic or advanced solid tumors.
  • One pt had breast cancer and the remainder had non- colorectal GI malignancies (esophagus, hepatobiliary, and pancreas).
  • One pt with pancreatic cancer had a confirmed partial response (PR) to treatment, and 3 others had stable disease for > 90 days.
  • CONCLUSIONS: The regimen of CapOx and L has efficacy in the treatment of solid tumors with established responsiveness to fluoropyrimidines or Ox.

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  • (PMID = 27961891.001).
  • [ISSN] 1527-7755
  • [Journal-full-title] Journal of clinical oncology : official journal of the American Society of Clinical Oncology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] J. Clin. Oncol.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] United States
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34. Sangha R, Ho C, Beckett L, Lau DH, Lara PN, Davies AM, Mack PC, Koslan GM, Holland WS, Gandara DR: Dual epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) inhibition: Phase I study combining cetuximab (C225) and erlotinib (E) in advanced solid tumors. J Clin Oncol; 2009 May 20;27(15_suppl):3552

  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] Dual epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) inhibition: Phase I study combining cetuximab (C225) and erlotinib (E) in advanced solid tumors.
  • Given preclinical synergy of C225 and E, we hypothesized this combination would be feasible and result in improved therapeutic benefit.
  • METHODS: Patients (pts) with advanced solid tumors were enrolled using a standard phase I dose escalation design.
  • C225 was administered IV weekly, with no loading dose, and E given orally daily on a 28-day cycle.
  • Dose limiting toxicity (DLT) was defined as: grade (Gr) 4 platelets, Gr 3 platelets with bleeding, febrile neutropenia, ≥ Gr 3 ANC with documented infection, or clinically significant > Gr 3 non-hematologic toxicity.
  • Of 13 evaluable pts, 1 PR (NSCLC) and 4 with SD (2 NSCLC, 2 H&N).
  • CONCLUSIONS:. 1) Dual EGFR inhibition with C225 250 mg/m<sup>2</sup> weekly and E 150 mg daily is feasible, well tolerated, and the recommended phase II dose.

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  • (PMID = 27961369.001).
  • [ISSN] 1527-7755
  • [Journal-full-title] Journal of clinical oncology : official journal of the American Society of Clinical Oncology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] J. Clin. Oncol.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] United States
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35. Sawaki A, Mizuno N, Takagi T, Hara K, Nakamura T, Tajika M, Kawai H, Matsumoto K, Kobayashi Y, Yamao K: Gastric submucosal tumors: Lessons learned from 10-year follow-up. J Clin Oncol; 2009 May 20;27(15_suppl):e15631

  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] Gastric submucosal tumors: Lessons learned from 10-year follow-up.
  • : e15631 Background: Gastric Submucosal tumors (SMTs) were incidentally discovered esophagogastroduodenoscopy (EGD).
  • All clinical data including incidence, size and location in stomach were analyzed for the medical records.
  • One patient was dead of SMT and the remaining 25 patients were dead of other disease till December 2008.
  • Both of them underwent surgical resection and diagnosed as gastrointestinal stromal tumors (GIST).

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  • (PMID = 27962746.001).
  • [ISSN] 1527-7755
  • [Journal-full-title] Journal of clinical oncology : official journal of the American Society of Clinical Oncology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] J. Clin. Oncol.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] United States
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36. Roberge D, Hickeson M, Charest M, Turcotte RE: Utility of total body FDG PET/CT imaging in the initial staging of soft-tissue sarcoma. J Clin Oncol; 2009 May 20;27(15_suppl):10531

  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • Ewing's sarcoma, rhabdomyosarcoma and GIST tumors were excluded as were patients imaged for follow-up, response assessment or recurrence.
  • In 21% of cases, the primary tumor had been removed by excisional biopsy or unplanned excision prior to staging.
  • 97% of the previously unresected primary tumors were FDG avid (SUV ≥ 2).
  • 81% of tumors were high-grade (FNCLCC Grade 2-3).
  • The primary tumor was stage T2b in 68% of cases.
  • At the end of staging, 17% of patients were considered to have metastatic disease.
  • PET scans were negative for distant disease in 64/75 cases.
  • Seven of these 64 cases had metastatic disease on chest CT (negative predictive value 89%).
  • 8 PET scans were positive - of these, 4 patients were already known to have metastases, 2 were pathologically proven false positives and 1 was a new finding of a pulmonary metastasis (sensitivity 46%).
  • Three patients had indeterminate PET scans (subsequently none developed metastatic disease).
  • Two incidental benign parotid tumors were found.
  • In addition, PET did not alter management of patients already know to have M1 disease (no new organ sites identified).
  • CONCLUSIONS: Although PET scans may be of use in specific circumstances, routine use of FDG PET imaging for detection of metastatic disease as part of the initial staging of soft-tissue sarcoma adds little to chest CT scanning and is unlikely to alter management.

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  • (PMID = 27963909.001).
  • [ISSN] 1527-7755
  • [Journal-full-title] Journal of clinical oncology : official journal of the American Society of Clinical Oncology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] J. Clin. Oncol.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] United States
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37. Barbastefano J, Garcia JA, Elson P, Wood LS, Lane BS, Dreicer R, Campbell S, Rini BI: Association of percentage of tumor burden removed with debulking nephrectomy and progression-free survival (PFS) in metastatic renal cell carcinoma (mRCC) patients (Pts) treated with VEGF-targeted therapy. J Clin Oncol; 2009 May 20;27(15_suppl):5095

  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] Association of percentage of tumor burden removed with debulking nephrectomy and progression-free survival (PFS) in metastatic renal cell carcinoma (mRCC) patients (Pts) treated with VEGF-targeted therapy.
  • The objective of this study was to determine if fractional percentage of tumor volume (FPTV) removed with debulking nephrectomy is associated with PFS on subsequent VEGF-targeted therapy.
  • METHODS: The Cleveland Clinic Urologic Oncology database from 2005-2008 was retrospectively reviewed to identify mRCC patients who had undergone debulking nephrectomy followed by VEGF-targeted therapy, defined as treatment with sunitinib, sorafenib, bevacizumab or sunitinib + bevacizumab.
  • FPTV was determined by the diameter of the primary tumor divided by the total tumor burden (per RECIST criteria) by investigator re-review of imaging studies.
  • PFS was defined from the start date of systemic therapy to disease progression per RECIST criteria.
  • The median diameter of the primary tumor was 9.3 cm (range, 3.3-21 cm).
  • CONCLUSIONS: Improved PFS on targeted systemic therapy is significantly associated with a greater percentage of tumor burden removed at debulking nephrectomy.

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  • (PMID = 27964293.001).
  • [ISSN] 1527-7755
  • [Journal-full-title] Journal of clinical oncology : official journal of the American Society of Clinical Oncology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] J. Clin. Oncol.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] United States
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38. Siemerink E, Schaapveld M, Hospers GA, Mulder NH, Plukker JT: Effect of hospitals on survival and postoperative mortality of stomach cancer: A population-based study on type, referral, and volume-effect in the northeast Netherlands. J Clin Oncol; 2009 May 20;27(15_suppl):e15564

  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • This area is served by one university hospital (U), 4 teaching hospitals (T), and 18 non-teaching hospitals (N-T).
  • Older age, advanced stage and proximal tumor location resulted in a lower probability of tumor resection.
  • However, patients with proximal tumors were more often referred for surgery to U (18%), especially by N-T hospitals.
  • In the non-proximal tumors the 5yrsurv was significantly better in U versus T and N-T hospitals, also after multivariate analysis.
  • CONCLUSIONS: We found highly superior survival for non-proximal tumors but not for proximal cancer in an university hospital.

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  • (PMID = 27962324.001).
  • [ISSN] 1527-7755
  • [Journal-full-title] Journal of clinical oncology : official journal of the American Society of Clinical Oncology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] J. Clin. Oncol.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] United States
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39. Gluck S, Russell C, O'Shaughnessy J, Yuan G, Odom D, Sherrill B, Blum J: Relationship between survival and estrogen receptor (ER) status in pts with metastatic breast cancer (MBC) treated with capecitabine (C) and docetaxel (D): An exploratory data analysis. J Clin Oncol; 2009 May 20;27(15_suppl):1024

  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • : 1024 Background: Previous studies in pts with MBC have shown that women with ER+ tumors have a longer survival time compared to women with ER- tumors.
  • Survival analysis was used to investigate the effect of baseline ER status of the primary and metastatic tumors on overall survival (OS).
  • ER status was defined as positive if positive for any tumor, negative if at least 1 negative test, otherwise unknown.
  • OS by time from diagnosis to recurrence and baseline tumor size showed no significant differences between ER+ and ER- pts.

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  • (PMID = 27961048.001).
  • [ISSN] 1527-7755
  • [Journal-full-title] Journal of clinical oncology : official journal of the American Society of Clinical Oncology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] J. Clin. Oncol.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] United States
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40. Fridlyand J, Kaiser L, Fyfe G: Is tumor burden a better predictor of drug activity than progression-free survival? J Clin Oncol; 2009 May 20;27(15_suppl):e17521

  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] Is tumor burden a better predictor of drug activity than progression-free survival?
  • Percentage change in tumor burden (%SLD) is a potentially earlier marker of drug activity than an early evaluation of progression-free survival (PFS) and includes aspects of tumor response not captured by PFS.
  • We repeatedly sampled patients, with their treatment assignments, tumor assessments and PFS values from these studies to emulate randomized Ph 2 trials with different sample sizes, enrollment patterns and follow-up.

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  • (PMID = 27963268.001).
  • [ISSN] 1527-7755
  • [Journal-full-title] Journal of clinical oncology : official journal of the American Society of Clinical Oncology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] J. Clin. Oncol.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] United States
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41. Gillison ML, Harris J, Westra W, Chung C, Jordan R, Rosenthal D, Nguyen-Tan P, Spanos WJ, Redmond KP, Ang K, Radiation Therapy Oncology Group: Survival outcomes by tumor human papillomavirus (HPV) status in stage III-IV oropharyngeal cancer (OPC) in RTOG 0129. J Clin Oncol; 2009 May 20;27(15_suppl):6003

  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] Survival outcomes by tumor human papillomavirus (HPV) status in stage III-IV oropharyngeal cancer (OPC) in RTOG 0129.
  • : 6003 Background: The favorable prognosis for HPV-positive (pos) OPC requires confirmation in a clinical trial of sufficient size to account for confounding variables including smoking.
  • METHODS: A correlative study was performed to evaluate the association of tumor HPV status (THS) and survival in a randomized phase 3 trial comparing standard fractionation (FX) radiotherapy (RT) and cisplatin (cis) (100 mg/m<sup>2</sup>, days 1, 22, 43) to accelerated FX-RT and cis (100 mg/m<sup>2</sup>, days 1, 22).
  • Two-year overall (OS, death) and progression-free survival (PFS, progression, salvage surgery, death) for patients with HPV-pos and HPV-negative [neg] OPC were estimated along with 95% confidence intervals (CIs) by Kaplan-Meier method and compared by log-rank test.
  • Hazard ratios (HR) for OS/PFS comparing HPV-pos to HPV-neg OPC after adjustment for treatment assignment, age, race, T and N stage, and smoking (< or ≥ 20 pack-years [p-y]) were estimated by use of Cox models along with 95% CIs with multiple imputation for cases with undetermined THS and/or missing p-y.
  • Patients with HPV-pos OPC had a 59% reduction in risk of death (HR 0.41 [0.27-0.64]) and a 46% reduction in risk of progression or death (HR 0.54 [0.37-0.78]).
  • Second primary tumors were less common among HPV-pos cases and patterns of first failure were similar.
  • CONCLUSIONS: Tumor HPV status is strongly associated with OS/PFS among OPC patients receiving standard of care chemo-radiation, and should now be a stratification factor for all clinical trials including OPC cases, and separate trials based on THS should be considered.

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  • (PMID = 27962410.001).
  • [ISSN] 1527-7755
  • [Journal-full-title] Journal of clinical oncology : official journal of the American Society of Clinical Oncology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] J. Clin. Oncol.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] United States
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42. Galsky MD, Von Hoff DD, Neubauer M, Anderson T, Fleming M, Sweetman RW, Mahoney J, Midwinter D, Vocila L, Zaks TZ: Target-specific, histology-independent, randomized discontinuation study of lapatinib in patients with HER2-amplified solid tumors. J Clin Oncol; 2009 May 20;27(15_suppl):3541

  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] Target-specific, histology-independent, randomized discontinuation study of lapatinib in patients with HER2-amplified solid tumors.
  • We sought to explore the activity of lapatinib, an oral tyrosine kinase inhibitor of HER2, with a trial design focused on the target rather than on tumor-type.
  • METHODS: Patients (pts) with HER2-amplified treatment-refractory metastatic gastro- esophageal (G/E), bladder (B), ovarian (O), or uterine (U) tumors were enrolled into a double-blinded randomized discontinuation study of lapatinib 1500 mg PO daily (malignancies selected based on reported frequencies of HER2 amplification).
  • The planned sample size was 250 HER2+ pts, with the goal of then randomizing 100 pts with SD at week (wk) 12 to either lapatinib or placebo until progressive disease (PD).
  • Pts who responded at wk 12 (CR or PR) continued on lapatinib; those who progressed were discontinued from study.
  • Secondary objectives were duration of response, progression free survival (PFS) after randomization, and determination of the incidence of HER2 amplification in multiple tumor types.
  • Futility analyses were preplanned to ensure feasibility of screening and of randomization (i.e. a sufficient rate of non- progression at 12 wks).
  • While HER2 amplifications appear to be prevalent in select non-breast tumors, lapatinib monotherapy in refractory disease is associated with a low level of objective responses.

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  • (PMID = 27961359.001).
  • [ISSN] 1527-7755
  • [Journal-full-title] Journal of clinical oncology : official journal of the American Society of Clinical Oncology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] J. Clin. Oncol.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] United States
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43. Yu J Sr, Han D, Zhong X, Mu D, Fu Z, Zhan G B, Zhang L, Zhang W: The optimal threshold of &lt;sup&gt;18&lt;/sup&gt;F-FLT PET and &lt;sup&gt;18&lt;/sup&gt;F-FDG PET to estimate the length of gross tumor volume in patients with squamous cell carcinoma of the thoracic esophagus verified by pathological examination. J Clin Oncol; 2009 May 20;27(15_suppl):e15665

  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] The optimal threshold of <sup>18</sup>F-FLT PET and <sup>18</sup>F-FDG PET to estimate the length of gross tumor volume in patients with squamous cell carcinoma of the thoracic esophagus verified by pathological examination.
  • : e15665 Background: To determine the optimal method of using 3-deoxy-3-<sup>18</sup>F-fluorothymidine (FLT) positron emission tomography (PET) to estimate gross tumor length in esophageal carcinoma, and compared with that of <sup>18</sup>F- fluorodeoxyglucose(FDG) PET.
  • Gross tumor volumes (GTVs) were delineated using seven different methods with FLT PET: visual interpretation, standardized uptake value (SUV) 1.3, SUV 1.4, SUV 1.5, and 20% of maximum standard uptake value (SUVmax), 25% SUVmax,30% SUVmax, on FLT PET imaging, and three different methods with FDG PET: visual interpretation, SUV 2.5, and 40%SUVmax on FDG PET imaging.
  • The length of tumors on FLT PET scan were measured and recorded as L<sub>FLTvis</sub>, L<sub>FLT1.3</sub>, L<sub>FLT1.4</sub>, L<sub>FLT1.5</sub>, L<sub>FLT20%</sub>, L<sub>FLT25%</sub>, and L<sub>FLT30%</sub>, and FDG PET scan were measured and recorded as L<sub>FDGvis</sub>, L<sub>FDG2.5</sub>, and L<sub>FDG40%</sub>, respectively, and compared with the length of gross tumor in the resected specimen measured by pathological examination (L<sub>Path</sub>).
  • The correlation coefficients were 0.952, 0.944, 0.959, 0.948, 0.763, 0.783, and 0.800, respectively.

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  • (PMID = 27962763.001).
  • [ISSN] 1527-7755
  • [Journal-full-title] Journal of clinical oncology : official journal of the American Society of Clinical Oncology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] J. Clin. Oncol.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] United States
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44. Drevs J, Lohrmann R, Niazi F, Scheele J, Diergarten K: Phase II/III study of Auron Misheil Therapy (AMT) versus placebo to evaluate clinical benefit response (CBR) in patients with advanced solid tumors. J Clin Oncol; 2009 May 20;27(15_suppl):e20696

  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] Phase II/III study of Auron Misheil Therapy (AMT) versus placebo to evaluate clinical benefit response (CBR) in patients with advanced solid tumors.
  • The multicenter randomized double blind phase III study AMT/P2CA/001 compares CBR efficacy and safety of AMT with placebo in patients with advanced solid tumors.
  • METHODS: Pts with inoperable advanced disease refractory to standard therapy or for which no standard therapy existed were included..
  • The general adverse event profile (related and not related events) reflects the advanced cancer disease of the patients, and no relevant differences were observed between the AMT-groups and the Placebo-group.
  • CONCLUSIONS: This study shows that CBR can be achieved with AMT after 2 respectively 6 weeks of treatment even in patients with advanced solid tumors and a clinically relevant number of patients seem to have a benefit from the study treatment.

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  • (PMID = 27961748.001).
  • [ISSN] 1527-7755
  • [Journal-full-title] Journal of clinical oncology : official journal of the American Society of Clinical Oncology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] J. Clin. Oncol.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] United States
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45. Arnold R, Müller H, Schade-Brittinger C, Rinke A, Klose K, Barth P, Wied M, Mayer C, Aminossadati B, PROMID Study Group: Placebo-controlled, double-blind, prospective, randomized study of the effect of octreotide LAR in the control of tumor growth in patients with metastatic neuroendocrine midgut tumors: A report from the PROMID study group. J Clin Oncol; 2009 May 20;27(15_suppl):4508

  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] Placebo-controlled, double-blind, prospective, randomized study of the effect of octreotide LAR in the control of tumor growth in patients with metastatic neuroendocrine midgut tumors: A report from the PROMID study group.
  • : 4508 Background: Octreotide is currently used for the control of symptoms in patients with gastroenteropancreatic neuroendocrine tumors (NETs).
  • However, the ability of long-acting somatostatin analogues to control the growth of well-differentiated metastatic NETs is a matter of debate.
  • METHODS: Treatment-naïve patients with histologically confirmed locally inoperable or metastasized well-differentiated NETs and a Karnofsky index >60 were randomized to receive either octreotide LAR 30 mg/month (mo) or placebo for 18 mos, or until tumor progression or death.
  • The primary endpoint was median time to tumor progression.
  • Secondary endpoints included objective tumor response rate (WHO criteria), measured every 3 mos, as well as symptom control and overall survival.
  • RESULTS: Eighty-five patients (n=43 octreotide LAR; n=42 placebo) have been enrolled to date and data from 67 patients with tumor progressions and 16 deaths (n=7 octreotide LAR; n=9 placebo) are included here.
  • Median time to tumor progression in the octreotide LAR and placebo groups were 14.3 mos and 6 mos, respectively (HR: 0.34; 95% CI: 0.20-0.59; P=0.000072).
  • After 6 mos of treatment, stable disease was seen in 67% and 37.2% of patients treated with octreotide LAR and placebo, respectively.
  • CONCLUSIONS: Octreotide LAR significantly lengthens median time to tumor progression compared with placebo in patients with metastatic NETs of the midgut.
  • Patients treated with octreotide LAR had a 66% risk reduction of tumor progression compared with patients receiving placebo.
  • Octreotide LAR demonstrates substantial tumor control and shows a more favorable antiproliferative response than placebo as two-thirds of patients treated with octreotide LAR achieved stable disease at 6 mos.

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  • (PMID = 27962687.001).
  • [ISSN] 1527-7755
  • [Journal-full-title] Journal of clinical oncology : official journal of the American Society of Clinical Oncology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] J. Clin. Oncol.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] United States
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46. Hartmann JT, Aschoff P, Dittmann H, Lichy M, Mayer F, Reischl G, von Weyhern C, Kanz L, Claussen CD, Pfannenberg C: The value of PET/CT with 18F-FLT and 18F-FDG in the management of metastatic germ cell tumors (GCT): A pilot study. J Clin Oncol; 2009 May 20;27(15_suppl):e16142

  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] The value of PET/CT with 18F-FLT and 18F-FDG in the management of metastatic germ cell tumors (GCT): A pilot study.
  • : e16142 Background: The purpose is to assess the ability of [F-18]-3'-Fluoro-3'-deoxythymidin (FLT), a cell proliferation marker, for early response monitoring and prediction of histology of residual tumor masses in patients (pts) with metastatic GCT in comparison to the standard tracer F-18-FDG, CT-scans and tumor markers.
  • Regarding early tumor response EORTC criterias were used.
  • Examination of resected masses revealed necrosis in 3/7, teratoma in 2/7 as well as 2/7 pts with viable tumors.
  • Prior to CTh the reference lesions showed increased FDG uptake (SUVrange/mean, 2.9-15.0/8.8) in all pts but moderate FLT uptake (SUVrange/mean, 1.7-9.7/3.7) in 10 out of 11 pts.
  • SUVavg decrease in early response FDG monitoring was 64% in responders and 60% in non-responders (p = 0.8), as well as 57% vs. 48% for FLT (p = 0.5), respectively, and 85% vs. 72% (FDG, p = 0.1) and 67% vs. 65% (FLT, p = 0.8) in the final monitoring.

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  • (PMID = 27963433.001).
  • [ISSN] 1527-7755
  • [Journal-full-title] Journal of clinical oncology : official journal of the American Society of Clinical Oncology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] J. Clin. Oncol.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] United States
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47. Tabernero J, Dirix L, Schoffski P, Cervantes A, Capdevila J, Baselga J, van Beijsterveldt L, Winkler H, Kraljevic S, Zhuang SH: Phase I pharmacokinetic (PK) and pharmacodynamic (PD) study of HDM-2 antagonist JNJ-26854165 in patients with advanced refractory solid tumors. J Clin Oncol; 2009 May 20;27(15_suppl):3514

  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] Phase I pharmacokinetic (PK) and pharmacodynamic (PD) study of HDM-2 antagonist JNJ-26854165 in patients with advanced refractory solid tumors.
  • Preclinical studies have demonstrated potent anti-proliferative and apoptosis-inducing activity of JNJ-26854165 in a broad range of p53 wild type and mutant tumor models.
  • Sequential skin and tumor biopsies are taken, and evaluations for HDM-2, p53 and other pathway related markers are performed, including further molecular analyses for HDM-2 activity.
  • PD data showed engagement of the targeted pathway such as dose-dependent p53 upregulation in skin, upregulation of HDM-2 levels in tumors after treatment, and an increase in plasma MIC-1 levels.

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  • (PMID = 27961305.001).
  • [ISSN] 1527-7755
  • [Journal-full-title] Journal of clinical oncology : official journal of the American Society of Clinical Oncology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] J. Clin. Oncol.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] United States
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48. Wu L, Liu W, Galustian C, Schafer P, Dalgleish AG, Bartlett JB: Effect of lenalidomide on the antiproliferative effect of gemcitabine against pancreatic tumor cells and on immune-mediated pancreatic cancer cell death. J Clin Oncol; 2009 May 20;27(15_suppl):e14635

  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] Effect of lenalidomide on the antiproliferative effect of gemcitabine against pancreatic tumor cells and on immune-mediated pancreatic cancer cell death.
  • Despite evidence of direct anti-proliferative activity against hematological cells in vitro, there is no evidence of single agent direct activity against solid tumor cells in vitro.
  • To take advantage of its known immune-enhancing properties alongside direct anti-tumor agents, lenalidomide is being advanced in solid tumor indications in combination with other agents.
  • METHODS: Here, we assess the effects of lenalidomide alone, and in combination with gemcitabine, on pancreatic cancer cell growth and survival, and the ability of lenalidomide to enhance the ability of human PBMC to kill allogeneic pancreatic tumor cells (BxPC3, PANC-1 and MiaPaCa) in a PBMC:tumor cell co-culture model.
  • About 20% of tumor cells were sensitive to immune-mediated cell death and, for BxPC3, this was increased significantly in the presence of lenalidomide.
  • Lenalidomide significantly and dose-dependently enhanced immune-mediated killing (both T and NK cells are required for tumor cell killing in this model).
  • For PANC-1 and MiaPaCa, immune-mediated killing was also increased by lenalidomide, albeit non-significantly.
  • CONCLUSIONS: These results suggest that, in addition to anti-angiogenic and other effects within the tumor microenvironment, lenalidomide may act as an immune adjuvant to enhance the recognition and apoptosis of tumor cells by host T and NK cells.
  • These studies support the potential utility of lenalidomide in combination with chemotherapeutic agents, gemcitabine in particular, in the treatment of patients with solid tumors including pancreatic cancer.

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  • (PMID = 27964188.001).
  • [ISSN] 1527-7755
  • [Journal-full-title] Journal of clinical oncology : official journal of the American Society of Clinical Oncology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] J. Clin. Oncol.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] United States
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49. Carlson DJ, Stewart RD, Semenenko VA: Effects of oxygen on intrinsic radiation sensitivity: A test of the relationship between aerobic and hypoxic linear-quadratic (LQ) model parametersa). Med Phys; 2006 Sep;33(9):3105-3115

  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • The poor treatment prognosis for tumors with high levels of hypoxia is usually attributed to the decreased sensitivity of hypoxic cells to ionizing radiation.
  • The relationships among radiosensitivity parameters imply that the dose to the hypoxic subvolume of the tumor needs to be escalated by a factor of the OER to achieve the same level of tumor control as in well oxygenated tumor regions.

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  • [Copyright] © 2006 American Association of Physicists in Medicine.
  • (PMID = 28525067.001).
  • [ISSN] 2473-4209
  • [Journal-full-title] Medical physics
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Med Phys
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] United States
  • [Keywords] NOTNLM ; Cancer / Cell processes / DNA / Data analysis / Data sets / Dosimetry / Effects of electromagnetic and acoustic fields on biological systems / Effects of ionizing radiation on biological systems / Electrodes / General statistical methods / LQ / Mercury (element) / Radiation therapy / Radiation treatment / Schottky barriers / TCP / cancer / cellular effects of radiation / hypoxia / least squares approximations / linear-quadratic model / oxygen / radiation therapy / radiosensitivity / survival / tumours
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50. Yin W, Di G, Liu G, Wu J, Lu J, Shen K, Han Q, Shen Z, Shao Z: Demographic features and prognostic profiles of breast cancer patients presenting with nipple discharge in Chinese population. J Clin Oncol; 2009 May 20;27(15_suppl):e22204

  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • METHODS: A total of 3234 patients, categorized as ND (2.47%) and non-nipple discharge (NND; 97.53%) according to different initial signs, were retrospectively analyzed.
  • RESULTS: ND group tended to have smaller tumors and less axillary lymph node (ALN) involvement than NND group (P < 0.05).
  • In Cox proportional hazards regression analysis, we found that tumor size (P < 0.001), ALN status (P < 0.001) were independent prognostic factors for RFS.
  • However, it was statistically significant (global test, P = 0.039), which hinted at a demand for the employment of Cox non-proportional hazards regression in this analysis.
  • In time dependent Cox model, ND status (P = 0.0495) as well as ERBB2 status (P = 0.017), tumor size (P < 0.001), ALN status (P < 0.001) were independent prognostic factors when ND and ERBB2 status were taken as time-varying covariates.

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  • (PMID = 27964133.001).
  • [ISSN] 1527-7755
  • [Journal-full-title] Journal of clinical oncology : official journal of the American Society of Clinical Oncology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] J. Clin. Oncol.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] United States
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51. Ozmen V, Ozkan Gurdal S, Muslumanoglu M, Igci A, Tuzlali SS, Ozcinar B, Canbay E, Kecer M, Dagoglu T: Predictive factor for residual tumor after lumpectomy for close margins. J Clin Oncol; 2009 May 20;27(15_suppl):e11538

  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] Predictive factor for residual tumor after lumpectomy for close margins.
  • When re-excisions are performed, there is often no residual disease in the new specimen, calling into question the need for re-excision(s) or mastectomy.
  • Clinicopathologic features were correlated with the presence of residual disease in the re-excision specimen.
  • There were no residual tumors in re-excision(65.6 %) or mastectomy(42.4%) specimens of patients.
  • The factors associated with tumor positive re-excision specimen were, age ≤50 years(p=0.044), lymphovascular invasion (p=0.029), multifocality(p<0.001), tumor size >2cm(p=0.008), presence of DCIS(p=0.018), focal margin positivity(p<0.001), DCIS at resection margin(p=0.008) and node positivity (p<0.001).

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  • (PMID = 27964684.001).
  • [ISSN] 1527-7755
  • [Journal-full-title] Journal of clinical oncology : official journal of the American Society of Clinical Oncology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] J. Clin. Oncol.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] United States
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52. Corless CL, Beadling C, Justusson E, Heinrich MC: Evaluation of the presence of IGF1R overexpression in wild-type and kinase mutant GI stromal tumors. J Clin Oncol; 2009 May 20;27(15_suppl):10506

  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] Evaluation of the presence of IGF1R overexpression in wild-type and kinase mutant GI stromal tumors.
  • : 10506 Background: Most adult GI stromal tumors have gain-of-function mutations in KIT (80%) or PDGFRA (5-7%).
  • Recently, Tarn et al. (PNAS 2008) identified IGF1R over-expression in all WT GIST in their series of cases, including one pediatric case.
  • We had previously genotyped the tumors to identify any kinase mutations.
  • Interestingly, the WT GIST group could be further divided into tumors with low vs. high IGF1R expression.

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  • (PMID = 27963697.001).
  • [ISSN] 1527-7755
  • [Journal-full-title] Journal of clinical oncology : official journal of the American Society of Clinical Oncology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] J. Clin. Oncol.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] United States
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53. Pappagallo GL, Spatafora S, Bari M, Sartori D, Vinante O: Efficacy of docetaxel in metastatic, castration-resistant prostate cancer (mCRPC): Comparison with therapeutic standards in other solid tumors. J Clin Oncol; 2009 May 20;27(15_suppl):5167

  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] Efficacy of docetaxel in metastatic, castration-resistant prostate cancer (mCRPC): Comparison with therapeutic standards in other solid tumors.
  • Therefore, the aim of this analysis was to consider the efficacy of docetaxel (DOC) in the treatment of mCRPC as compared with the efficacy results previously observed in breast cancer (BC), non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC), and colorectal cancer (CRC).
  • METHODS: A systematic review (Review Manager 5, Cochrane Collaboration, 2008) of the phase III studies which defined the new standard approaches in the 1st-line cytotoxic chemotherapy of metastatic disease for the above mentioned neoplasms was conducted.
  • RESULTS: BC (4 studies, 1313 patients), TAX vs non TAX: OR 0.84 (95% CL 0.66 1.07), NNT (odds ratio) at 5 years = 28.
  • NSCLC (9 studies, 4671 patients), DDP vs non DDP: OR 0.83 (95% CL 0.74 0.94), NNT (odds ratio) at 1 year = 23.
  • CRC (3 studies, 1256 patients), FOLFOX vs non FOLFOX: OR 0.72 (95% CL 0.54 0.98), NNT (odds ratio) at 5 years = 22. mCRPC (2 studies, 1439 patients), DOC vs non DOC: OR 0.78 (95%CL 0.63 0.96), NNT (odds ratio) at 3 years = 16.
  • CONCLUSIONS: TAX in BC, DDP in NSCLC and FOLFOX in CRC are the 1st choice cytotoxic approach to metastatic disease, with relative reductions in the risk of death (RRR) of 16%, 17% and 28%, respectively; thus, you will need to treat 28, 23 and 22 patients to prevent one additional death, in the order.

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  • (PMID = 27964501.001).
  • [ISSN] 1527-7755
  • [Journal-full-title] Journal of clinical oncology : official journal of the American Society of Clinical Oncology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] J. Clin. Oncol.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] United States
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54. Fakih MG, Pendyala L, Egorin MJ, Fetterly G, Espinoza-Delgado I, Ross M, Phelan J, Kramer Z, Yirinec B, Diasio R: A phase I clinical trial of vorinostat in combination with sFULV2 in patients with refractory solid tumors. J Clin Oncol; 2009 May 20;27(15_suppl):4083

  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] A phase I clinical trial of vorinostat in combination with sFULV2 in patients with refractory solid tumors.
  • Pre-clinical studies demonstrate that vorinostat down-regulates intra-tumor TS in a dose-dependent fashion and augments 5-FU antitumor activity in xenograft models.
  • We conducted a phase I clinical trial of an intermittent schedule of QD x 3 vorinostat in combination with a fixed dose of fluorouracil (5-FU) and leucovorin (LV) in patients (pts) with refractory solid tumors.
  • Vorinostat dose-levels (DL) were 600 mg, 800 mg, 1000 mg, 1200 mg, 1400 mg, 1700 mg, and 2000 mg.
  • Dose-limiting toxicities (DLT), consisting of fatigue and hand-and-foot syndrome (H&F), were seen in 2 of 3 pts at the 2000 mg DL.
  • Cycle 1 grade 3/4 toxicities consisted of thrombocytopenia, GI bleeding, fatigue, and H&F in 2 pts at the 2000 mg DL and a non-DLT G3 diarrhea (lasted <24 hrs) in 1 pt at the 1700 mg DL.
  • 12/21 CRC pts had a confirmed SD (11) or PR (1).
  • CRC pts had a median PFS of 4 months, a ≥ 6 months PFS rate of 43%, and a ≥ 8 months PFS rate of 33%.
  • An expanded MTD cohort is accruing to investigate 5-FU-vorinostat PK interaction and intra-tumor TS down-regulation. (This work was supported by a grant from CTEP and the ACS.

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  • (PMID = 27961640.001).
  • [ISSN] 1527-7755
  • [Journal-full-title] Journal of clinical oncology : official journal of the American Society of Clinical Oncology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] J. Clin. Oncol.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] United States
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55. Deshpande HA, Gettinger S, Rowen E, Abu-Khalaf MM, Clarke J, Burns AJ, Kelly WK: A phase I study investigating the combination of orally bioavailable platinum and nanoparticle albumin-bound paclitaxel in advanced solid tumors. J Clin Oncol; 2009 May 20;27(15_suppl):e13501

  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] A phase I study investigating the combination of orally bioavailable platinum and nanoparticle albumin-bound paclitaxel in advanced solid tumors.
  • : e13501 Background: The combination of a taxane and a platinum agent is considered a standard chemotherapy regimen for many solid tumors.
  • The primary aim of this study was to determine a safe dose for the combination of S +A and to investigate if there were pharmacokinetic (PK) interactions between S + A in patients (pts) with advanced malignancies.
  • To date 6 patients had progressive disease, 4 had stable disease (3.8 months), 3 patients (2 with prostate cancer and 1 with hypopharyngeal cancer) had a partial response.

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  • (PMID = 27961256.001).
  • [ISSN] 1527-7755
  • [Journal-full-title] Journal of clinical oncology : official journal of the American Society of Clinical Oncology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] J. Clin. Oncol.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] United States
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56. Chen T, Liu C, Song X, Zhang L, Liu Y, Wery J, Chen Y: A strategy for clinical guidance using PD biomarkers revealed from human primary (HuPrime) tumors transplanted in nude mice. J Clin Oncol; 2009 May 20;27(15_suppl):e14612

  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] A strategy for clinical guidance using PD biomarkers revealed from human primary (HuPrime) tumors transplanted in nude mice.
  • Activation of tyrosine kinases in tumor cells has been recognized as key driving force in malignancy; therefore inhibitors of tyrosine kinases (TKI) have often shown efficacy in preclinical in vivo models and beneficial responses in clinical trials.
  • Tumor tissues from sensitive esophageal HuPrime models treated with single dose of the respective drugs (and a vehicle control) have been collected at time-points 4, 8, 16, and 24 hour.
  • RESULTS: We have successfully applied immunohistochemistry (IHC) assays on many molecules covering most pathways including proliferation, apoptotic, necrotic, and cell cycle regulation, G2M phase arrest, DNA damage response, etc.
  • Additional markers including angiogenesis can also be included for certain therapeutic compounds.

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  • (PMID = 27964120.001).
  • [ISSN] 1527-7755
  • [Journal-full-title] Journal of clinical oncology : official journal of the American Society of Clinical Oncology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] J. Clin. Oncol.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] United States
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57. Langenberg MH, Witteveen PO, Lankheet N, Roodhart JM, Rosing H, Beijnen JH, Voest EE: Phase I study of combination treatment with PTK 787/ZK 222584 (PTK/ZK) and cetuximab for patients with advanced solid tumors: Safety, pharmacokinetics, pharmacodynamics, and toxicity analysis. J Clin Oncol; 2009 May 20;27(15_suppl):2575

  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] Phase I study of combination treatment with PTK 787/ZK 222584 (PTK/ZK) and cetuximab for patients with advanced solid tumors: Safety, pharmacokinetics, pharmacodynamics, and toxicity analysis.
  • : 2575 Background: Based on the current knowledge of tumor biology there is a rationale to combine targeted therapies that block different growth factor pathways.
  • Here we combined PTK/ZK, a small molecule inhibitor of all three vascular endothelial growth factor receptors, PDGFR and c-kit, with cetuximab, a monoclonal antibody against the epidermal growth factor receptor.
  • RESULTS: Safety and tolerability were evaluated in 16 out of 18 treated patients (median age 61, range 43-78) with advanced tumors of the colon (8), lung (1), chordoma (2), biliary tract (1), cervix (1), ovarian (1), breast (1) and pancreatic cancer (1).
  • 7 out of 14 patients evaluable for efficacy analysis (50%) showed SD for at least 2 months and 1 patient (colon cancer) a PR for 11.5 months.
  • CONCLUSIONS: This study shows that the combination of PTK/ZK and cetuximab is well tolerated with only slightly overlapping toxicity profiles and has anti tumor activity.

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  • (PMID = 27961895.001).
  • [ISSN] 1527-7755
  • [Journal-full-title] Journal of clinical oncology : official journal of the American Society of Clinical Oncology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] J. Clin. Oncol.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] United States
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58. Curran WJ, Chen AY, Garden AS, Harari P, Murphy BA, Wong S, Bellm LA, Schwartz M, Dawson D, Ang KK: Longitudinal oncology registry of head and neck carcinoma (LORHAN): First report of outcomes. J Clin Oncol; 2009 May 20;27(15_suppl):6071

  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] Longitudinal oncology registry of head and neck carcinoma (LORHAN): First report of outcomes.
  • Baseline characteristics were similar between settings, except that pts treated at academic centers were significantly younger (58 vs. 62 years of age), had poorer performance status (mean Zubrod: 0.9 vs. 0.7), had fewer laryngeal tumors (17% vs. 27% of pts) but more oropharyngeal tumors (42% vs. 37% of pts) and presented with more advanced disease (stage IV: 70% vs. 48% of pts) compared to pts treated in community.
  • CONCLUSIONS: LORHAN demonstrates it is feasible to collect more detailed information about patient and tumor features and treatment other than surgery.
  • Changes in the pattern of care and survival findings are expected to emerge as newer regimens, including IC and targeted agents, are incorporated more broadly into clinical practice, and data in LORHAN matures.

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  • (PMID = 27961937.001).
  • [ISSN] 1527-7755
  • [Journal-full-title] Journal of clinical oncology : official journal of the American Society of Clinical Oncology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] J. Clin. Oncol.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] United States
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59. Hazama S, Okuyama Y, Kato T, Okayama N, Hinoda Y, Sakamoto J, Mishima H, Fujita Y, Hamamoto Y, Oka M: Use of genotype subset selections of multi-UGT1As polymorphisms to predict severe neutropenia and tumor responses of metastatic CRC patients received FOLFIRI regimen. J Clin Oncol; 2009 May 20;27(15_suppl):e15038

  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] Use of genotype subset selections of multi-UGT1As polymorphisms to predict severe neutropenia and tumor responses of metastatic CRC patients received FOLFIRI regimen.
  • However the tumor response to irinotecan is variable and unpredictable.
  • RESULTS: Out of 71 patients, 34 had G3/4 neutropenia or leukopenia, and 23 had tumor responses (CR +PR).
  • Other polymorphism was not the predictive factor for toxicity and tumor response, independently.
  • On the other hand, genotype subset selection of multi-UGT1As polymorphisms was useful to predict severe toxicities and tumor responses.
  • Similarly, high risk group of toxicity or high and low tumor responses groups was also predicted by genotype subset selections.
  • CONCLUSIONS: Genotype subset selections of multi-UGT1As polymorphisms were the excellent predictor for severe toxicities and tumor responses of metastatic CRC patients received FOLFIRI regimen.

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  • (PMID = 27964468.001).
  • [ISSN] 1527-7755
  • [Journal-full-title] Journal of clinical oncology : official journal of the American Society of Clinical Oncology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] J. Clin. Oncol.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] United States
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60. Ma D, Zhang H, Kennedy B, Parsons T, Olson WC: Antitumor activity of PSMA ADC after progression on docetaxel in a mouse xenograft model of human prostate cancer. J Clin Oncol; 2009 May 20;27(15_suppl):3030

  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • Here, we describe the use of PSMA ADC in a mouse model to treat xenografted human prostate tumors that have progressed following docetaxel therapy.
  • Docetaxel significantly reduced tumor growth (p = 0.025) during the initial phase of the study; however, most of the tumors later progressed.
  • When the tumor volume of an animal in the docetaxel group exceeded 400 mm<sup>3</sup>, the animal was rerandomized to receive continued docetaxel therapy (n = 18) or weekly IV doses of 6 mg/kg PSMA ADC (n = 18).
  • Treatment effects were assessed by measuring tumor volume and overall survival.
  • When tumor volume was assessed to be ≥2,000 mm<sup>3</sup>, animals would be sacrificed.
  • RESULTS: At 134 days following tumor implantation, the survival rate was 100% for animals in the PSMA ADC treatment group; 94% of these mice had tumor sizes <100 mm<sup>3</sup>.
  • In the continued docetaxel treatment group, 14 of 18 animals that were sacrificed when their tumors exceeded 2,000 mm<sup>3</sup>; the survival rate was 22%.
  • Therefore, PSMA ADC treatment significantly shrank tumors and increased overall survival of animals compared to continued docetaxel treatment (p < 0.0001).
  • CONCLUSIONS: PSMA ADC had antitumor activity in mice to xenografted human prostate tumors that had progressed following docetaxel treatment.

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  • (PMID = 27962082.001).
  • [ISSN] 1527-7755
  • [Journal-full-title] Journal of clinical oncology : official journal of the American Society of Clinical Oncology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] J. Clin. Oncol.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] United States
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61. Berkowitz JL, Fernandez A, Dichmann RA, Kennedy KA, DiCarlo B: Clinical trials networks and enrollment of historically underrepresented populations in medical oncology trials. J Clin Oncol; 2009 May 20;27(15_suppl):e20598

  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] Clinical trials networks and enrollment of historically underrepresented populations in medical oncology trials.
  • : e20598 Background: Oncology research is limited by the very low number of patients accrued into clinical trials.
  • This allows for increased accrual and access for these patients while potentially increasing the pace of progress in clinical oncology research.
  • It may also help to accelerate the progress of medical oncology research towards better treatments for all patients.

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  • (PMID = 27961158.001).
  • [ISSN] 1527-7755
  • [Journal-full-title] Journal of clinical oncology : official journal of the American Society of Clinical Oncology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] J. Clin. Oncol.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] United States
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62. Hanker LC, Karn T, Rody A, Ruckhäberle E, Solbach C, Kaufmann M: Prognostic value of gene expression of p63 by microarray analysis in estrogen receptor positive and negative breast cancer. J Clin Oncol; 2009 May 20;27(15_suppl):566

  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • This gene family seems to play an important role in carcinogenesis and its members may act as oncogenes or tumor suppressor genes.
  • P63 is overexpressed in many different tumors like head and neck cancer, lung cancers, uterine tumors and breast cancer, and has been associated with poor prognosis in some studies.
  • RESULTS: P63 expression showed a strong correlation with patient's age (χ<sup>2</sup>-test, p < 0.001), tumor size (p < 0.003), proliferation rate (p < 0.001), Topo2α expression (p = 0.001) and estrogen receptor expression (p = 0.017).
  • In univariate Cox regression analysis p63 showed a hazard ratio (HR) of 1.61 (95% CI 1.31-2.00, p < 0.001) for disease free survival.
  • The prognostic impact of p63 expression was independent of Ki67 expression (p = 0.011 and p = 0.001 for high and low Ki67, respectively).
  • Moreover a worse prognosis of low p63 expressing tumors was found in both subgroups of ErbB2 positive tumors (p < 0.001) and ErbB2 negative tumors (p < 0.001).

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  • (PMID = 27960724.001).
  • [ISSN] 1527-7755
  • [Journal-full-title] Journal of clinical oncology : official journal of the American Society of Clinical Oncology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] J. Clin. Oncol.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] United States
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63. Reeves DM, Helton E, Speakman J, Ness E, Komatsoulis G: Creation of a library of harmonized standard research variables and case report forms (CRFs) for oncology research. J Clin Oncol; 2009 May 20;27(15_suppl):e17512

  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] Creation of a library of harmonized standard research variables and case report forms (CRFs) for oncology research.
  • : e17512 Background: Oncology clinical research can be facilitated through use of a set of core variables to collect, aggregate, analyze and report data across a number of diverse research settings.
  • METHODS: A schematic to represent commonly-used CRFs in oncology trials was created as a roadmap for the project.
  • CRFs were contributed by the community-at-large, including the pharmaceutical industry and NCI cooperative groups.
  • CONCLUSIONS: The identification and reuse of standards to support the conduct of oncology research depends upon our ability to manage data sets that can be aggregated and analyzed in a timely manner.
  • The caBIG CRF harmonization and standardization variables are being implemented now through a series of early adoption activities and a phased deployment plan that will result in the reuse of a single set of variables to support the conduct of oncology clinical trials.

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  • (PMID = 27963273.001).
  • [ISSN] 1527-7755
  • [Journal-full-title] Journal of clinical oncology : official journal of the American Society of Clinical Oncology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] J. Clin. Oncol.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] United States
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64. Bidyasar S, Kurzrock R, Falchook GS, Naing A, Wheler JJ, Durand J, Yang P, Johansen MJ, Newman RA, Khan R, Hong D: A first-in-human phase I trial of PBI-05204 (oleandrin), an inhibitor of Akt, FGF-2, NF-Kb, and p70S6K in advanced solid tumor patients. J Clin Oncol; 2009 May 20;27(15_suppl):3537

  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] A first-in-human phase I trial of PBI-05204 (oleandrin), an inhibitor of Akt, FGF-2, NF-Kb, and p70S6K in advanced solid tumor patients.
  • Over-expression of the α-3 subunit in malignant cells correlates with the tumor proliferation.
  • In this ongoing study of PBI-05204, we sought to determine the DLTs, MTD and recommended phase II dose in advanced solid tumors patients (pts) and to characterize its' pharmacokinetics (PK) and pharmacodynamics (PD).
  • Of the 15 evaluable pts, 3 had stable disease for > 4 months, with bladder, colorectal, and fallopian tube cancer pts having an 11, 16, and 10% reduction by RECIST respectively.
  • Initial response evaluation shows activity in diverse tumors with PD analysis suggesting target effect.

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  • (PMID = 27961333.001).
  • [ISSN] 1527-7755
  • [Journal-full-title] Journal of clinical oncology : official journal of the American Society of Clinical Oncology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] J. Clin. Oncol.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] United States
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65. McKay CE, Infante J, Jones S, Bendell J, Greco FA, Markus TM, Spigel DR, Yardley DA, Woudenberg J, Lathia CD, Burris HA: A pharmacokinetic (PK) and safety study of sorafenib plus capecitabine in advanced solid tumors. J Clin Oncol; 2009 May 20;27(15_suppl):e14548

  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] A pharmacokinetic (PK) and safety study of sorafenib plus capecitabine in advanced solid tumors.
  • : e14548 Background: The addition of a multi-targeted kinase inhibitor such as sorafenib (S) to standard chemotherapy holds promise for improving therapeutic efficacy in multiple advanced solid tumors.
  • METHODS: Eligibility included patients (pts) with refractory solid tumors, 0-1 ECOG, adequate organ function, and no prior anti-VEGF tyrosine kinase inhibitors.
  • This single institution study enrolled two simultaneous cohorts of 6 pts each followed by an expansion: Cohort A received S 400 mg bid for 21 days and C 750 mg/m<sup>2</sup> bid for 14 days of a 21-day cycle.
  • Cohort B received S 400 mg bid for 21 days and C 1,000 mg/m<sup>2</sup> bid for 14 days of a 21-day cycle.
  • Intensive PK collections (pre, 30 min, 1, 2, 4, 6, 8, and 12 hr) were obtained following a week of exposure to S alone, C alone (both C and 5FU levels measured), and both S and C in combination.
  • Tumor types include colon (4), pancreas (2), prostate (2), and other (11).
  • Despite early and aggressive clinical management, hand foot skin reaction (HFS) necessitated dose reductions in 1 pt in cohort A and 4 pts in cohort B.
  • Of the 13 pts evaluable for response, 8 (47%) had stable disease following first restaging scans.

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  • (PMID = 27963620.001).
  • [ISSN] 1527-7755
  • [Journal-full-title] Journal of clinical oncology : official journal of the American Society of Clinical Oncology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] J. Clin. Oncol.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] United States
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66. Limentani SA, Awada A, Dirix L, Beck J, Dieras V, Binlich F, Germa C, Agrapart V, Powell C, Hershman D: Safety and efficacy of neratinib (HKI-272) in combination with vinorelbine in patients with solid tumors. J Clin Oncol; 2009 May 20;27(15_suppl):e14554

  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] Safety and efficacy of neratinib (HKI-272) in combination with vinorelbine in patients with solid tumors.
  • In this phase 1 study, a combination dose of neratinib plus vinorelbine that is tolerable was determined in patients (pts) with solid tumors.
  • Tumor measurements were made every 6 wks by modified RECIST criteria.
  • Preliminary efficacy data show that 1 pt with stomach cancer had stable disease, lasting ≥21 weeks.
  • CONCLUSIONS: The combination of 240 mg neratinib and 25 mg/m<sup>2</sup> vinorelbine was found to be tolerable and to demonstrate early evidence of clinical benefit in pts with solid tumors, to be assessed further in pts with metastatic ErbB-2+ breast cancer in part 2.

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  • (PMID = 27963588.001).
  • [ISSN] 1527-7755
  • [Journal-full-title] Journal of clinical oncology : official journal of the American Society of Clinical Oncology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] J. Clin. Oncol.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] United States
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67. Pucciarelli S, Enzo M, Agostini M, Pizzini S, Del Bianco P, Lonardi S, Friso M, Mescoli C, Urso E, Nitti D: Cell-free circulating DNA as a promising marker of colorectal cancer detection and progression. J Clin Oncol; 2009 May 20;27(15_suppl):11059

  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • : 11059 Background: Since the pathologic stage is the most powerful prognostic factor for colorectal cancer (CRC), there is a strong need of non-invasive methods for early detection.
  • It has been suggested that cfDNA (ALU repeats of 115 bp, representative of total DNA; ALU repeats of 247 DNA, representative of tumor DNA) may be associated with presence of tumor.
  • RESULTS: The median concentrations of total cfDNA (ALU115) in the plasma samples from patients with stages III-IV and stages I-II CRC, adenoma and normal controls were 52,4, 11.9; 1.9, and 1.7 ng/ml, respectively (p<.0001).
  • The corresponding figures for tumor-related cfDNA (ALU247) were 48.8, 4.7, 2.2, and 0.7 ng/ml, respectively. (p<.0001).
  • With a cut-off of 4.86 ng/ml, total DNA (ALU115) showed a sensitivity of 78.52 (95% CI 70.6-85.1) and a specificity of 86.08 (95% CI 76.4-92.8) in distinguishing patients with CRC from non-CRC [AUC: 0.860 (95% CI 0.81-0,90), p-value=.0001].
  • With a cut-off of 3.04, cfDNA tumor-related (ALU247) showed a sensitivity of 77.94 (95% CI 70.0-84.6) and a specificity of 82.28 (95% CI 72.1-90.0) in distinguishing patients with CRC from non-CRC [AUC: 0.864 (95% CI 0.81-0,91), p-value=.0001].
  • CONCLUSIONS: Both ALU115 and ALU 247 fragments of circulating cfDNA seem promising non-invasive molecular markers of detection and progression of CRC.

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  • (PMID = 27963165.001).
  • [ISSN] 1527-7755
  • [Journal-full-title] Journal of clinical oncology : official journal of the American Society of Clinical Oncology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] J. Clin. Oncol.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] United States
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68. Wosnitzer M, Lee DJ, Hirsch AJ, McKiernan JM: Predictors of renal function in nephron sparing surgery for renal cell carcinoma in solitary kidneys. J Clin Oncol; 2009 May 20;27(15_suppl):e16045

  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • METHODS: A retrospective analysis of the Columbia Urologic Oncology database found 1327 patients were treated for RCC from 1988 - 2008, of whom 38 consecutive patients underwent PN on a solitary kidney.
  • Glomerular filtration rate (GFR) was estimated with the Modification of Diet in Renal Disease (MDRD) equation.
  • Severe chronic kidney disease (CKD) and renal failure were defined as GFR of 15-30 cc/min/1.73m2 and GFR<15, respectively.
  • The mean estimated blood loss was 465cc, the mean tumor diameter was 3.9cm, and 6 (17%) of the patients had a positive surgical margin.
  • Preoperative GFR (HR=1.01, p<0.01) and the volume of kidney removed (HR=0.93, p=0.01) were associated with severe CKD and renal failure on a univariate Cox regression analysis, but were not independent predictors after adjusting for age, race, tumor stage and grade.
  • Preoperative GFR, volume removed, age, tumor stage or grade were not independent predictors of RCC recurrence.

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  • (PMID = 27963019.001).
  • [ISSN] 1527-7755
  • [Journal-full-title] Journal of clinical oncology : official journal of the American Society of Clinical Oncology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] J. Clin. Oncol.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] United States
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69. Combs SE, Hartmann C, Welzel J, von Deimling A, Debus J, Platten M, Wick W, Gaiser T: Influence of expression of EGFR and PTEN on outcome in patients with primary glioblastoma treated with standard radiochemotherapy and cetuximab: Interim analysis from the GERT-Protocol. J Clin Oncol; 2009 May 20;27(15_suppl):2050

  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • : 2050 Background: The epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) is commonly amplified, overexpressed, and mutated in glioblastoma (GBM).
  • METHODS: To date, 39 patients were treated within the GERT protocol (Combs SE et al., 2006) evaluating radiochemotherapy (RCHT) with temozolomide (TMZ) and weekly CTX.
  • Pretreatment paraffin-embedded tumor tissue of 32 patients was available for molecular analysis.
  • We analyzed amplification of EGFR, expression of EGFR, EGFRvIII, the tumor-suppressor PTEN and O(6)-methylguanine DNA methyltransferase (MGMT) gene promoter methylation.
  • MGMT promoter hypermethylation was detected in 16/32 tumours.
  • Methylated MGMT did not impact PFS or OS (p = 0.48 and p = 0.08).
  • Data on EGFR copy number of 31/32 tumors showed EGFR gene amplification in 11 tumors.
  • EGFRvIII was seen in 5/32 patients, only in tumors with EGFR amplification.

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  • (PMID = 27964655.001).
  • [ISSN] 1527-7755
  • [Journal-full-title] Journal of clinical oncology : official journal of the American Society of Clinical Oncology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] J. Clin. Oncol.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] United States
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70. Shehaby AE, Ganz JC, Reda WA, Hafez A: Mechanisms of edema after gamma knife surgery for meningiomas. J Neurosurg; 2005 Jan;102(s_supplement):1-3

  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • ✓ The authors describe two patients in whom tumor swelling and brain swelling (and possible tumor swelling), respectively, developed after undergoing gamma knife surgery.
  • One had a skull defect with a palpable parasagittal tumor.
  • One had neurofibromatosis Type 2 with multiple tumors, one of which was parasagittal.

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  • (PMID = 28306444.001).
  • [ISSN] 1933-0693
  • [Journal-full-title] Journal of neurosurgery
  • [ISO-abbreviation] J. Neurosurg.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] United States
  • [Keywords] NOTNLM ; complications / dexamethasone / gamma knife surgery / meningioma
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71. Thompson DS, Flaherty K, Messersmith W, Harlacker K, Nallapareddy S, Vincent C, DeMarini DJ, Cox DS, O'Neill VJ, Burris HA 3rd: A three-part, phase I, dose-escalation study of GSK1120212, a potent MEK inhibitor, administered orally to subjects with solid tumors or lymphoma. J Clin Oncol; 2009 May 20;27(15_suppl):e14584

  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] A three-part, phase I, dose-escalation study of GSK1120212, a potent MEK inhibitor, administered orally to subjects with solid tumors or lymphoma.
  • PO administration of GSK1120212 achieved tumor regression in multiple mouse xenograft models.
  • METHODS: In Part 1, patients (pts) with solid tumors or lymphoma are enrolled in successive cohorts and receive a single PO dose of GSK1120212 followed by QD doses on days 1 - 21 of each 28-day cycle.
  • Tumor response is assessed Q 8 weeks.
  • In Part 3, pts with biopsiable tumors will enroll at MTD and sub-MTD doses.
  • Tumor biopsies will be taken pre- and post-dose to measure pERK and other markers of cell proliferation.

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  • (PMID = 27963752.001).
  • [ISSN] 1527-7755
  • [Journal-full-title] Journal of clinical oncology : official journal of the American Society of Clinical Oncology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] J. Clin. Oncol.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] United States
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72. Lee S, Kim S, Kang H, Lee E, Kim E, Ko K, Kwon Y: Correlation of tumor size on preoperative breast MRI and pathologic tumor size in Asian patients. J Clin Oncol; 2009 May 20;27(15_suppl):e11546

  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] Correlation of tumor size on preoperative breast MRI and pathologic tumor size in Asian patients.
  • We enrolled 357 patients consecutively in this retrospective study; 290 patients (non-MRI group) with preoperative mammography (MMG) and ultrasonography (US) vs. 66 patients (MRI group) with additional MRI to MMG, US and excluded 67 patients (42 patients with preoperative chemotherapy, 8 patients with ipsilateral recurrence, 17 patients whose MRI showed no residual lesion after excisional biopsy).
  • In MRI group, we evaluated the correlation between tumor size on US, MRI and pathologic tumor size.
  • RESULTS: Mean age of this study was 48.89 years (Non-MRI group: 50.70 years vs. MRI group: 46.33 years, p=0.001).
  • The rate of mastectomy wasn't different in both groups (Non-MRI group: 13.7% vs. MRI group: 19.4%, p=0.252).
  • Intraoperative conversion to mastectomy was performed frequently in MRI group. (Non-MRI group: 1.7% vs. MRI group: 7.5%, p=0.023).
  • But positive margin rate in frozen specimen was similar in both groups (Non-MRI group: 23.2% vs. MRI group: 34.0%, p=0.111).
  • In MRI group, mean tumor size on MRI, US was 3.07cm, 1.98cm respectively.
  • Mean pathologic tumor size was 2.67cm.
  • The tumor size on MRI correlated strongly with the pathologic tumor size.
  • But the tumor size on US didn't correlate with the pathologic tumor size (p=0.066).
  • In twenty nine patients whose MMG showed suspicious microcalcification, tumor size on MRI also correlated strongly with pathologic tumor size.
  • But US didn't show the correlation with the pathologic tumor size in these patients.
  • CONCLUSIONS: Preoperative breast MRI didn't give the impact on breast cancer surgery in Asian patients and could overestimate the size of tumor.
  • But it could strongly correlate with the pathologic tumor size in Asian patients.

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  • (PMID = 27964667.001).
  • [ISSN] 1527-7755
  • [Journal-full-title] Journal of clinical oncology : official journal of the American Society of Clinical Oncology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] J. Clin. Oncol.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] United States
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73. Libutti SK, Paciotti GF, Myer L, Haynes R, Gannon W, Walker M, Seidel G, Byrnes A, Yuldasheva N, Tamarkin L: Results of a completed phase I clinical trial of CYT-6091: A pegylated colloidal gold-TNF nanomedicine. J Clin Oncol; 2009 May 20;27(15_suppl):3586

  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • : 3586 Background: CYT-6091 is the first tumor-targeted nanomedicine formulation designed to safely deliver an API that itself is not approved for systemic administration due to unacceptable toxicity.
  • CYT-6091, consisting of tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF) covalently linked to pegylated colloidal gold nanoparticles, has been safely administered in preclinical models, demonstrating an increased T1/2 compared to native TNF, a documented trafficking of nanoparticles to tumor, and no hypotension, the known DLT for TNF.
  • METHODS: CYT-6091 was tested in a phase I open label trial in solid tumor, advanced stage patients.
  • Secondary endpoints included PK, disease response (staged 45 days post treatment by RECIST), and the detection of gold nanoparticles in tumors and in adjacent healthy tissue.
  • In the 28 patients eligible for response assessment, there was 1 PR (100 μg/m2 dose, 7 months duration) and 3 SD (2, 2, and 3 months duration).
  • Electron micrographs show gold nanoparticles in tumor biopsies.
  • CYT-6091 targets tumors in humans.

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  • (PMID = 27961746.001).
  • [ISSN] 1527-7755
  • [Journal-full-title] Journal of clinical oncology : official journal of the American Society of Clinical Oncology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] J. Clin. Oncol.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] United States
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74. Ingersoll SB, Yue P, Ahmad S, Turkson J, Edwards JR, Holloway RW: Molecular characterization of highly tumorigenic cell lines used in a xenograph model to investigate cellular therapy for the treatment of refractory ovarian cancer. J Clin Oncol; 2009 May 20;27(15_suppl):e16516

  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • Our aim was to characterize OC cell lines which can be utilized to test cellular therapy in combination with cytokines or chemotherapies to elicit a graph versus tumor response to treat refractory OC patients.
  • Tumors were harvested when mice became moribund; ascitic fluid (AF) and solid tumor (ST) tissue were snap-frozen.
  • We investigated the activation status in the SKOV3-derived cells of STAT3, which has been associated with malignant transformation and tumor progression.
  • RESULTS: Parental SKOV3-RFP cells when injected at a dose of 5x10<sup>6</sup> gave a tumor incidence of 4/6 in 14 weeks.
  • AF1 and AF2, when injected at a dose of 1x10<sup>6</sup> resulted in 100% tumor incidence in 5-weeks (n = 5).
  • CONCLUSIONS: The SKOV3-derived lines that we developed will be a better model to test novel OC treatment regiments because these lines exhibit increased resistance to IFNα-2b, are more tumorigenic in a xenograph model, show aberrant STAT3 activation, and tumors harvested from these lines express genes that make these lines more aggressive.

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  • (PMID = 27960755.001).
  • [ISSN] 1527-7755
  • [Journal-full-title] Journal of clinical oncology : official journal of the American Society of Clinical Oncology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] J. Clin. Oncol.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] United States
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75. Block MS, Markovic SN: Relationship of systemic immune dysregulation in advanced tumors to vascular growth factor overproduction. J Clin Oncol; 2009 May 20;27(15_suppl):e22124

  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] Relationship of systemic immune dysregulation in advanced tumors to vascular growth factor overproduction.
  • : e22124 Background: Therapeutic anti-cancer vaccine strategies have been effective in a broad range of preclinical tumor models, but clinical trials of vaccines in metastatic cancer patients have failed to show clinical benefit.
  • We have previously shown that patients with stage IV melanoma have systemic immunosuppression including elevated plasma levels of immunosuppressive cytokines and impaired DTH responses to recall antigens.
  • Patients with stage IV melanoma also have elevated circulating levels of the vascular growth factors vascular endothelial growth factor A (VEGF A) and placental growth factor (PlGF).
  • Based on these observations, we have hypothesized that vascular growth factors such as VEGF and PlGF mediate systemic immunosuppression.
  • METHODS: FVB mice with established ANV6 transplantable breast tumors were bled, and plasma samples were assayed for VEGF, PlGF, and interleukin (IL)-10.
  • Splenocytes taken from tumor-bearing mice were stimulated via the T cell receptor (TCR), and interferon gamma (IFN) production was measured.
  • RESULTS: Compared with age- and sex-matched controls, tumor-bearing mice had elevated plasma levels of VEGF, PlGF, and the immunosuppressive cytokine IL-10 (see table ).
  • Furthermore, splenocytes from tumor-bearing mice produced less IFN upon TCR stimulation than did splenocytes from control mice.
  • CONCLUSIONS: We have shown that mice with advanced tumors exhibit both elevated levels of vascular growth factors and systemic immune inhibition.
  • Taken together, these results suggest that excess vascular growth factors may mediate immunosuppression in animals with advanced tumors, which may in turn impair anti-tumor vaccine efficacy.

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  • (PMID = 27963562.001).
  • [ISSN] 1527-7755
  • [Journal-full-title] Journal of clinical oncology : official journal of the American Society of Clinical Oncology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] J. Clin. Oncol.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] United States
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76. Johnson K, Berger A, Watkins T, Cheadle C, Casciola-Rosen L, Levine SM: Gene set enrichment analysis to evaluate expression of autoantigens in lung cancer. J Clin Oncol; 2009 May 20;27(15_suppl):e22048

  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • It has been demonstrated that myositis-specific autoantigens are expressed at higher levels in tumors associated with myositis compared to normal tissue, suggesting that immune responses to antigens expressed in nascent tumors may contribute to the autoimmune process.
  • Whether this observation is a general feature of autoantigen expression in tumor tissue, and whether the relative expression of these antigens is enriched in relation to the rest of the tumor transcriptome is currently unknown.
  • METHODS: Tumor tissue from ten lung cancer biopsies (adenocarcinoma (4), carcinoid (4), and squamous cell carcinoma (2)) and normal lung from the same patients were obtained.
  • Gene Set Enrichment Analysis was performed using 20 disease-specific autoantigen gene sets and 1892 gene sets from the Molecular Signatures Database.
  • RESULTS: Single-linkage hierarchical clustering analysis reveals groups of autoantigens that are differentially expressed between normal lung tissue, carcinoid tumors, and adenocarcinomas.
  • Adenocarcinoma tumor samples were significantly enriched for myositis (nominal p-value <0.001, false discovery rate (FDR) q-value 0.009) and SLE autoantigens (p-value 0.004, FDR 0.029).
  • Scleroderma autoantigens were enriched in carcinoid tumors (p-value 0.003, FDR 0.053).
  • Increased protein expression of the autoantigens Mi-2 and topoisomerase-1 in carcinoid tumors was confirmed by immunoblotting.
  • While autoantigens comprise only a small fraction of the total transcriptome, they are disproportionately expressed in tumors known to associate with autoimmunity, supporting the hyporthesis that autoimmunity to these proteins may arise via nascent anti-tumor responses.

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  • (PMID = 27963230.001).
  • [ISSN] 1527-7755
  • [Journal-full-title] Journal of clinical oncology : official journal of the American Society of Clinical Oncology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] J. Clin. Oncol.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] United States
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77. Liapi E, Hong K, Georgiades CS, Wahlin T, Reyes D, Kamel IR, Geschwind JH: Standardized treatment and follow-up protocol of hepatocellular carcinoma with transcatheter arterial chemoembolization: Survival, clinical, and tumor control outcome over 12 years at a U.S. center. J Clin Oncol; 2009 May 20;27(15_suppl):e15522

  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] Standardized treatment and follow-up protocol of hepatocellular carcinoma with transcatheter arterial chemoembolization: Survival, clinical, and tumor control outcome over 12 years at a U.S. center.
  • : e15522 Background: To report the outcome of the care of patients with hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) treated with standardized transcatheter arterial chemomembolization (TACE), with a focus on tumor response according to Response Evaluation Criteria in Solid Tumors (RECIST), progression of underlying cirrhosis [Child-Pugh (CP) score], time to progression (TTP) and survival from 1996 to 2008.
  • Liver disease status was evaluated before and at the end of the treatment period with the CP class system and tumor size measurements according to the RECIST.
  • Three chemotherapeutic agents and lipiodol, followed by non-occlusive embolization were utilized during TACE.
  • Sixty six percent of patients had 3 or more tumors, with a mean tumor size at presentation of 6.9 cm.
  • Interestingly, advanced BCLC patients achieved similar tumor response (PR:33%), TTP of 13.4 months and median survival of 13.7 months.
  • CONCLUSIONS: Patients with HCC treated with the aforementioned standardized TACE and follow-up protocol showed durable survival, stable liver disease and effective tumor control.

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  • (PMID = 27962261.001).
  • [ISSN] 1527-7755
  • [Journal-full-title] Journal of clinical oncology : official journal of the American Society of Clinical Oncology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] J. Clin. Oncol.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] United States
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78. Khan A, Tovar YE, Rodriguez C, Huerta AL, Rajabi B, Hakim MN, Mulla ZD: Incidence of triple negative breast cancer phenotype in a predominantly Hispanic cohort. J Clin Oncol; 2009 May 20;27(15_suppl):e22188

  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • : e22188 Background: In daily oncology practice, triple-negative invasive breast cancer is defined by negative immunohistochemistry for ER, PR and HER-2.
  • Patients with this phenotype experience poor prognosis due to limited treatment options and intrinsic tumor biology.
  • In a population-based case-control study, the Carolina Breast Cancer Study (Carey et al, JCO, 2004: suppl; abstr 9510), the triple-negative phenotype in African-American women represented 33.9% of the tumors.
  • ER, PR and HER-2 was performed by immunohistochemistry.
  • The vast majority had grade 3 tumors (82%) with a high Ki-67 proliferative index (97%).
  • The triple-negative phenotype was strongly associated with high tumor grade and proliferative index.

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  • (PMID = 27963608.001).
  • [ISSN] 1527-7755
  • [Journal-full-title] Journal of clinical oncology : official journal of the American Society of Clinical Oncology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] J. Clin. Oncol.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] United States
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79. Xu Y, Ma S, Yu D, Wang J, Zhang L, Di X: FDG-PET/CT imaging for staging and definition of tumor volumes in radiation treatment planning in non-small cell lung cancer. J Clin Oncol; 2009 May 20;27(15_suppl):7574

  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] FDG-PET/CT imaging for staging and definition of tumor volumes in radiation treatment planning in non-small cell lung cancer.
  • : 7574 Background: 18F-fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG)-positron emission tomography (PET) /computed tomography (CT) has a potential improvement for staging and radiation treatment (RT) planning of various tumor sites.
  • We analyzed the use of FDG-PET/ CT images for staging and evaluated the impact of FDG- PET/CT on the radiotherapy volume delineation compared with CT in patients with non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) candidates for radiotherapy.
  • Intraobserver variation in delineating tumor volumes was also observed.
  • Gross Tumor Volume (GTV) was contoured by four radiation oncologists respectively on CT (CT-GTV) and PET/CT images (PET/CT-GTV).
  • For the second phase was four intraobserver variation in delineating tumor volumes.
  • CONCLUSIONS: PET/CT fusion images could have a potential impact on both tumor staging and treatment planning.
  • Implementing matched PET/CT reduced observer variation in delineating tumor volumes significantly with respect to CT only.

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  • (PMID = 27963382.001).
  • [ISSN] 1527-7755
  • [Journal-full-title] Journal of clinical oncology : official journal of the American Society of Clinical Oncology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] J. Clin. Oncol.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] United States
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80. Richardson F, Richardson K, Sennello G, Young D, Orlov S, Pápai-Székely Z, Keshavjee S, Kim J, Cerfolio R, Shepherd FA: Biomarker analysis from completely resected NSCLC patients enrolled in an adjuvant erlotinib clinical trial (RADIANT). J Clin Oncol; 2009 May 20;27(15_suppl):7520

  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • : 7520 Background: RADIANT is a phase III trial comparing erlotinib 150 mg daily vs. placebo (2:1) in stage IB-IIIA NSCLC patients with EGFR-positive tumors (IHC and/or FISH), following complete surgical resection.
  • Correlative biomarker studies on primary tumor tissue, whole blood, and serum are key components of the study.
  • METHODS: Tumor tissue was evaluated by IHC for protein expression of EGFR (PharmDx Kit, Dako with + ≥ 1% positive tumor cells), by FISH for gene expression of EGFR (Vysis, Abbott), and by Wave HS for EGFR and Kras mutations.
  • Preliminary comparisons suggest that EGFR mut rate increased while Kras mut rate decreased with tumor stage.
  • EGFR mut occurred in 29/178 (16%) females (F) vs. 23/271 (8%) males (M), 19/57 (33%) Asians (A) vs. 33/392 (8%) non-Asians (NA), and 29/66 (44%) never smokers (NS) vs. 23/383 (6%) current or former smokers (S).
  • One tumor sample demonstrated both an activating EGFR and Kras mut.
  • FISH positivity rates are greater than observed in late-stage tumors.
  • Remaining results in this early-stage population are consistent with those observed in advanced-stage disease.

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  • (PMID = 27963287.001).
  • [ISSN] 1527-7755
  • [Journal-full-title] Journal of clinical oncology : official journal of the American Society of Clinical Oncology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] J. Clin. Oncol.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] United States
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81. Fusi A, Busse A, Ochsenreither S, Rietz A, Keilholz U: Expression of stem cell markers in circulating melanoma cells. J Clin Oncol; 2009 May 20;27(15_suppl):e22056

  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • : e22056 Background: Within circulating tumor cells there may be a subset of cell with stem cell (tumor initiating) characteristics able to develop distant metastasis.
  • Several markers including nestin and CD133 have been found to be possible candidates to identify such a kind of subpopulation in other experimental models.
  • METHODS: Between 50 and 100 ml of peripheral blood were collected from 12 melanoma patients with various tumor burden as well as three healthy volunteers.
  • Blood samples were enriched for tumour cells by CD45 depletion of the leukocyte fraction using magnetic beads separation (EasySep, Stem Cell Technologies. Inc.).
  • CONCLUSIONS: The novel negative separation technique allows reliable isolation of melanoma cells from peripheral blood of patients with metastatic disease.

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  • (PMID = 27963238.001).
  • [ISSN] 1527-7755
  • [Journal-full-title] Journal of clinical oncology : official journal of the American Society of Clinical Oncology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] J. Clin. Oncol.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] United States
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82. Li J, Gong FJ, Li J, Wu WA, Shen L: Adjuvant therapy with imatinib in gastrointestinal stromal tumor (GIST) patients with intermediate or high risk: Analysis from a single-center contrast study. J Clin Oncol; 2009 May 20;27(15_suppl):10556

  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] Adjuvant therapy with imatinib in gastrointestinal stromal tumor (GIST) patients with intermediate or high risk: Analysis from a single-center contrast study.
  • : 10556 Background: Imatinib benefits the patients with metastatic GIST but whether it is effective in the adjuvant setting after complete tumor resection of primary GIST is questionable.
  • METHODS: Patients who had undergone complete tumor resection with intermediate or high risk of recurrence (define) were enrolled in a single-center non-randomized open contrast study.
  • Patients had adjuvant therapy with imatinib (400mg once a day) for 3 years commencing within 12 weeks of tumor resection, or had follow-up alone.
  • We performed c-kit and PDGFRA mutation analysis for patients with archival tumor samples.
  • For further sub-group analysis, Log-rank and Cox regression analysis showed that adjuvant therapy could significantly decrease recurrence risk in patients with high risk disease (define)(2-year RFS: 91.5% vs 46,2%, Log-Rank: P<0.001, HR:0.107 (95%CI 0.031-0.370), P<0.001).
  • CONCLUSIONS: Adjuvant therapy with imatinib can improve 1-year and 2-year recurrence-free survival for patients with an intermediate or high risk of recurrence after complete tumor resection.

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  • (PMID = 27963942.001).
  • [ISSN] 1527-7755
  • [Journal-full-title] Journal of clinical oncology : official journal of the American Society of Clinical Oncology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] J. Clin. Oncol.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] United States
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83. Sheehan J, Kondziolka D, Flickinger J, Lunsford LD: Gamma knife surgery for glomus jugulare tumors: an intermediate report on efficacy and safety. J Neurosurg; 2005 Jan;102(s_supplement):241-246

  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] Gamma knife surgery for glomus jugulare tumors: an intermediate report on efficacy and safety.
  • OBJECT: Glomus jugulare tumors are rare tumors that commonly involve the middle ear, temporal bone, and lower cranial nerves.
  • Despite these therapies, tumor control can be difficult to achieve particularly without undo risk of patient morbidity or mortality.
  • The authors examine the safety and efficacy of gamma knife surgery (GKS) for glomus jugulare tumors.
  • METHODS: A retrospective review was undertaken of the results obtained in eight patients who underwent GKS for recurrent, residual, or unresectable glomus jugulare tumors.
  • The median radiosurgical dose to the tumor margin was 15 Gy (range 12-18 Gy).
  • In the seven patients in whom radiographic follow up was obtained, the tumor size decreased in four and remained stable in three.
  • CONCLUSIONS: Gamma knife surgery would seem to afford effective local tumor control and preserves neurological function in patients with glomus jugulare tumors.

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  • (PMID = 28306446.001).
  • [ISSN] 1933-0693
  • [Journal-full-title] Journal of neurosurgery
  • [ISO-abbreviation] J. Neurosurg.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] United States
  • [Keywords] NOTNLM ; gamma knife surgery / glomus jugulare tumor / radiosurgery
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84. Carbone A, Cabras A, Gloghini A: HIV-associated Hodgkins lymphoma. Antiapoptotic pathways and mechanisms for immune escape by tumor cells in the setting of improved immunity. Int J Biol Markers; 2007 Apr - Jun;22(2):161-163

  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] HIV-associated Hodgkins lymphoma. Antiapoptotic pathways and mechanisms for immune escape by tumor cells in the setting of improved immunity.

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  • (PMID = 28207144.001).
  • [ISSN] 1724-6008
  • [Journal-full-title] The International journal of biological markers
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Int. J. Biol. Markers
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] Italy
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85. Liu X, Kim P, Liu L, Lee T, Barham R, Lin F, Harvey J, Ybarrondo B, Singh S: Profiling of receptor tyrosine kinases (RTK) activation in circulating tumor cells (CTCs) in metastatic tumors using proximity mediated microarray immunoassay. J Clin Oncol; 2009 May 20;27(15_suppl):11024

  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] Profiling of receptor tyrosine kinases (RTK) activation in circulating tumor cells (CTCs) in metastatic tumors using proximity mediated microarray immunoassay.
  • : 11024 Background: The abnormal activation of HER1 and HER2 has been linked to various types of cancer progression, and the changes in their expression status between primary tumor and CTCs have been reported to occur at a significant frequency.
  • Methods for detecting HER1/HER2 phosphorylation in serially collected CTCs may provide valuable insight into the overall disease profile shift, and therefore lead to better selection of therapy combination for individual patient.
  • As CTCs found in metastatic stage represent the most aggressive invading cell population, serial CTC-profiling can lead to better therapy selection/adjustment and disease/treatment monitoring as there are available options to choose appropriate kinase inhibitors for RTK-targeted therapies.

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  • (PMID = 27963969.001).
  • [ISSN] 1527-7755
  • [Journal-full-title] Journal of clinical oncology : official journal of the American Society of Clinical Oncology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] J. Clin. Oncol.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] United States
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86. Brunetto AT, Ang JE, Lal R, Olmos D, Frentzas S, Mais A, Hauns B, Mollenhauer M, Lahu G, de Bono JS: A first-in-human phase I study of 4SC-201, an oral histone deacetylase (HDAC) inhibitor, in patients with advanced solid tumors. J Clin Oncol; 2009 May 20;27(15_suppl):3530

  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] A first-in-human phase I study of 4SC-201, an oral histone deacetylase (HDAC) inhibitor, in patients with advanced solid tumors.
  • METHODS: Patients (pts) with advanced refractory solid tumors were dosed once daily (QD) d1-5 in a 14-day cycle in sequential cohorts of 3-6 pts with 50 or 100% dose increments.
  • Pharmacodynamic assessment (histone acetylation and HDAC enzyme activity) and anti-tumor efficacy were secondary objectives.
  • 8 of 9 pts treated in the 600mg and 800mg cohorts had stable disease during the main phase of the study (4 treatment cycles).

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  • (PMID = 27961348.001).
  • [ISSN] 1527-7755
  • [Journal-full-title] Journal of clinical oncology : official journal of the American Society of Clinical Oncology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] J. Clin. Oncol.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] United States
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87. Mathieu-Boue A, Bouché O, Cioffi A, Rios M, Duffaud F, Chaigneau L, Ray-Coquard I, Blay J, Le Cesne A, Deschaseaux C: Malignant gastrointestinal stromal tumors treated with imatinib in France: Results in unselected patients. J Clin Oncol; 2009 May 20;27(15_suppl):e22177

  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] Malignant gastrointestinal stromal tumors treated with imatinib in France: Results in unselected patients.
  • : e22177 Background: GISTs are rare tumors of the GI tract.
  • RESULTS: 29 on 51 selected centers enrolled at least one pt and 127 pts were included (as of 12/2008), The median age of disease onset was 59 years (range 29 - 85) with 48% pts>50 years.
  • Primary tumors were most often gastric (34%), or from jejunum/ileum (24%).
  • At diagnosis 84% of pts had a tumor size over 5cm.
  • 64% of patients had surgery of the primary tumor before starting IM.

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  • (PMID = 27963715.001).
  • [ISSN] 1527-7755
  • [Journal-full-title] Journal of clinical oncology : official journal of the American Society of Clinical Oncology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] J. Clin. Oncol.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] United States
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88. Wu H, Ramanathan RK, Srychor S, Zamboni BA, Ramalingam S, Edwards RP, Friedland DM, Stoller RG, Belani CP, Zamboni WC: Population pharmacokinetics of pegylated liposomal CKD-602 (S-CKD602) in patients with advanced solid tumors. J Clin Oncol; 2009 May 20;27(15_suppl):2545

  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] Population pharmacokinetics of pegylated liposomal CKD-602 (S-CKD602) in patients with advanced solid tumors.
  • S-CKD602, a PEGylated long-circulating liposomal formulation of CKD-602, was developed to achieve a longer intra-tumoral exposure of CKD602 and a higher therapeutic index.
  • METHODS: Plasma samples from 45 patients (pts) with solid tumors were collected in a phase I study.
  • The presence of primary or metastatic tumor(s) located in the liver decreased the inter- individual variability (IIV) in the CL of encapsulated CKD-602 by 13%.
  • Typical values of Vmax of encapsulated CKD-602 in pts with and without hepatic tumor(s) were 156 and 103 μg/h, respectively (P < 0.001).
  • In addition, pts with tumors in the liver may have an increased clearance of S-CKD602.

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  • (PMID = 27961861.001).
  • [ISSN] 1527-7755
  • [Journal-full-title] Journal of clinical oncology : official journal of the American Society of Clinical Oncology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] J. Clin. Oncol.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] United States
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89. Ruiz-Garcia EB, Scott V, Machavoine C, Bidart JM, Lacroix L, Delaloge S, Andre F: Use of gene expression profiling to identify fibronectin 1 and MIG as candidate biomarkers for breast cancer screening. J Clin Oncol; 2009 May 20;27(15_suppl):e22034

  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • We used differential gene expression between breast cancer samples and benign tumors to identify candidate biomarkers for blood-based screening Methods: 3 candidate proteins (Fibronectin 1, CXCL9, Complement Factor B) were identified from a gene expression dataset that included 120 breast cancer samples and 45 benign lesions.
  • Proteins selection was done with these criteria: differential gene expression between cancer and benign lesion, protein released in the extracellular medium (SwissProt), commercially available ELISAkit, accuracy of the ELISA assay in a feasibility study (n=23).
  • RESULTS: 73% of the patients were cT1-T2 tumour.
  • A combined score including Fibronectin 1 and CXCL9 dosages presented a sensitivity of 53% and a 98% specificity.
  • Similar performances were observed for ER-negative tumors Conclusions: This study suggests that Fibronectin 1/CXCL9 dosage in serum could screen a significant rate of breast cancer, including ER-negative breast cancer.

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  • (PMID = 27963150.001).
  • [ISSN] 1527-7755
  • [Journal-full-title] Journal of clinical oncology : official journal of the American Society of Clinical Oncology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] J. Clin. Oncol.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] United States
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90. Yeh J, Frieze D, Martins R, Carr L: Clinical utility of routine proteinuria evaluation in the treatment decisions of patients receiving bevacizumab for metastatic solid tumors: A retrospective study. J Clin Oncol; 2009 May 20;27(15_suppl):6599

  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] Clinical utility of routine proteinuria evaluation in the treatment decisions of patients receiving bevacizumab for metastatic solid tumors: A retrospective study.
  • : 6599 Background: Bevacizumab is an anti-VEGF monoclonal antibody approved for use in metastatic breast, colorectal, and non-small cell lung cancer patients.
  • The manufacturer recommends monitoring for the development of proteinuria but does not provide specific recommendations, except to discontinue treatment if the patient develops nephrotic syndrome.
  • This retrospective analysis describes the incidence, severity, and cost of routine proteinuria monitoring in patients with metastatic solid tumors.

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  • (PMID = 27963901.001).
  • [ISSN] 1527-7755
  • [Journal-full-title] Journal of clinical oncology : official journal of the American Society of Clinical Oncology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] J. Clin. Oncol.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] United States
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91. Chang J, Wen B, Kazanzides P, Zanzonico P, Finn RD, Fichtinger G, Ling CC: A robotic system for F18-FMISO PET-guided intratumoral pO2 measurements. Med Phys; 2009 Nov;36(11):5301-5309

  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • An image-guided robotic system was used to measure the oxygen tension (pO2) in rodent tumor xenografts using interstitial probes guided by tumor hypoxia PET images.
  • Rats with ∼1cm diameter tumors were anesthetized and immobilized in a custom-fabricated whole-body mold.
  • Guided by the 3D microPET image set, measurements were performed at various locations in the tumor and compared to the corresponding F18-FMISO image intensity at the respective measurement points.
  • Experiments were performed on four tumor-bearing rats with 4 (86), 3 (80), 7 (162), and 8 (235) measurement tracks (points) for each experiment.
  • The cumulative scatterplots of pO2 versus image intensity yielded a hyperbolic relationship, with correlation coefficients of 0.52, 0.48, 0.64, and 0.73, respectively, for the four tumors.

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  • [Copyright] © 2009 American Association of Physicists in Medicine.
  • (PMID = 28525089.001).
  • [ISSN] 2473-4209
  • [Journal-full-title] Medical physics
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Med Phys
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] United States
  • [Keywords] NOTNLM ; Cancer / Computer software / Flow visualization / Medical imaging / Optical fiber testing / Positron emission tomography / Positron emission tomography (PET) / Radiation therapy / Radioactivity / Robotics / Tissues / biomedical measurement / hypoxia / image guidance / medical robotics / organic compounds / oxygen / pO2 measurement / position control / positron emission tomography / pressure measurement / robot / small animal imaging / tumours
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92. Lurje G, Leers JM, Pohl A, Oezcelik A, Zhang W, Yang D, Hagen JA, DeMeester SR, DeMeester TR, Lenz HJ: Polymorphisms in epidermal growth factor (EGF) and proteinase activated receptor 1 (PAR-1) associated with tumor recurrence in localized adenocarcinoma (EA) of the esophagus treated with surgery alone. J Clin Oncol; 2009 May 20;27(15_suppl):4564

  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] Polymorphisms in epidermal growth factor (EGF) and proteinase activated receptor 1 (PAR-1) associated with tumor recurrence in localized adenocarcinoma (EA) of the esophagus treated with surgery alone.
  • : 4564 Background: Tumor angiogenesis is a well-recognized aspect of human cancer biology and is mediated at least in part by EGF and PAR-1, which in turn may impact the process of tumor growth and progression.
  • Systemic tumor recurrence after curative resection continues to be a significant problem in the management of patients with localized EA.
  • Further, it is being increasingly recognized that esophageal squamous cell carcinoma and EA are separate and distinct disease groups and need to be considered individually.
  • We therefore designed a large retrospective study of EA patients to identify novel molecular markers of prognosis to better define tumor stage and progression, and help to define novel targets, as well as surrogate-endpoints of disease progression and response to therapy.
  • 114 out of 239 (48%) patients had tumor recurrence, with a probability of 5-year recurrence of 0.62 ± 0.04.
  • CONCLUSIONS: This study supports the role of functional EGF and PAR-1 polymorphisms as independent prognostic markers in localized EA and may therefore help to identify patient subgroups at high risk for tumor recurrence.

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  • (PMID = 27963056.001).
  • [ISSN] 1527-7755
  • [Journal-full-title] Journal of clinical oncology : official journal of the American Society of Clinical Oncology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] J. Clin. Oncol.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] United States
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93. Gomez-Roca CA, Koscielny S, Dromain C, Marzouk I, Bidault F, Bahleda R, Ferte C, Massard C, Soria J: Comparison between RECIST evaluations and variations in tumor growth dynamics in patients included in phase I trials. J Clin Oncol; 2009 May 20;27(15_suppl):2515

  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] Comparison between RECIST evaluations and variations in tumor growth dynamics in patients included in phase I trials.
  • We investigated the impact of pre-treatment tumor growth dynamics on the evaluation of response to treatment in phase I trials.
  • Tumor growth rate (GR=% change in tumor volume per month) was calculated for the pre-treatment period (from the 1<sup>st</sup> available evaluation to D0), and the experimental period (after D0).
  • Disease control (DC) was defined as stable disease, partial response or complete response.
  • Tumor GR differed according to the time period: 26.6% per month during pre-treatment period vs. 6.6% in experimental period (P<0.01).
  • There was a significant association between a time to progression > 12 weeks and a decrease in GR during the experimental period (P=0.01).
  • CONCLUSIONS: Pre-treatment growth dynamic may directly impact RECIST evaluation of tumor response and thus should be carefully documented.
  • Patients with slow growing tumors tend to experience DC, even if treatment has little effect.
  • The evaluation of response to treatment should take into account pre-treatment tumor GR.

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  • (PMID = 27961831.001).
  • [ISSN] 1527-7755
  • [Journal-full-title] Journal of clinical oncology : official journal of the American Society of Clinical Oncology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] J. Clin. Oncol.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] United States
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94. Stein MN, Knox B, Wesolowsky E, Levitt M, Moss R, Poplin E, Mehnert J, Gounder M, Goodin S, DiPaola R: Phase I trial of patupilone (P) and RAD001 in patients (pts) with advanced solid tumors. J Clin Oncol; 2009 May 20;27(15_suppl):2529

  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] Phase I trial of patupilone (P) and RAD001 in patients (pts) with advanced solid tumors.
  • : 2529 Background: P is an epothilone with activity in solid tumors including docetaxel (D) resistant prostate cancer.
  • This on-going phase I study is assessing the tolerability of P in combination with R in pts with advanced solid tumors.
  • METHODS: Eligible patients with ECOG PS 0-2, adequate organ function and no more than 3 prior chemotherapy treatment received P every 21 days and weekly R using a standard 3+3 dose escalation schema in a 21 day(d) cycle starting at 50% of the phase II dose of P and 60% of the standard weekly dosing of R.
  • RESULTS: A total of 24 pts have been enrolled and 23 pts are evaluable for toxicity (tumor types: colon-7, prostate-6, lung-3, ampulla-3, leiomyosarcoma-2, cervical cancer-1).
  • In pts with prostate cancer (all previously pretreated with D) PSA declines of >50% occurred in 3/5 pts treated with >2 cycles; 1/7 pts with colon cancer had a PR and 3/7 pts with colon cancer had stable disease (SD) > 8 cycles; 1/3 pts with ampullary ca had a PR and a pt with cervical ca had SD x10 cycles.
  • Encouraging evidence of clinical activity is observed in prostate, colon and other tumor types.

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  • (PMID = 27961847.001).
  • [ISSN] 1527-7755
  • [Journal-full-title] Journal of clinical oncology : official journal of the American Society of Clinical Oncology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] J. Clin. Oncol.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] United States
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95. Matias-Guiu X, Dolcet X, Llobet D, Poveda A, Pallares J, Eritia N, Yeramian A, Sorolla A, Ortega E, Llombart-Cussac A: Targeting the extrinsic apoptotic pathway in endometrial carcinoma cell lines and tumor cell explants. J Clin Oncol; 2009 May 20;27(15_suppl):e16555

  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] Targeting the extrinsic apoptotic pathway in endometrial carcinoma cell lines and tumor cell explants.
  • One of the critical regulators of apoptosis resistance in EC is FLIP, under the control of NFkB and a cellular complex composed of CK2, KSR1, and BRAF.
  • METHODS: Four different EC cell lines, which are known to exhibit resistance to TRAIL/FAS-induced apoptosis (Ishikawa, KLE, HEC1A, and RL-95) were exposed to various pharmacologic substances that target proteins involved in the regulation of the extrinsic apoptotic pathway and receptor tyrosine kinases including bortezomib, sorafenib, sunitinib, DRB, apigenin, MG-132, epoxomicin, and ALLN.
  • Results were validated in tumor cell explants.

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  • (PMID = 27960810.001).
  • [ISSN] 1527-7755
  • [Journal-full-title] Journal of clinical oncology : official journal of the American Society of Clinical Oncology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] J. Clin. Oncol.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] United States
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96. Rink L, Skorobogatko Y, Kossenkov A, Belinsky MG, Pajak TF, von Mehren M, Ochs MF, Eisenberg B, Godwin AK: Correlation of gastrointestinal stromal tumor (GIST) gene expression signatures and response to imatinib mesylate in the Radiation Therapy Oncology Group phase II clinical trial S-0132. J Clin Oncol; 2009 May 20;27(15_suppl):10533

  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] Correlation of gastrointestinal stromal tumor (GIST) gene expression signatures and response to imatinib mesylate in the Radiation Therapy Oncology Group phase II clinical trial S-0132.
  • METHODS: A recently completed prospective phase II trial of neoadjuvant/adjuvant IM treatment for advanced primary and recurrent operable GISTs included gene expression profiling using oligonucleotide microarrays on tumor samples obtained before and after neoadjuvant IM therapy for 8 to 12 weeks.
  • Fifty-two analyzable patients were classified according to changes in tumor size after IM based on CT scan measurements.
  • A response was defined as >25% tumor reduction.
  • In addition, a custom siRNA library was designed targeting these genes and a mid-throughput siRNA synthetic lethal screening approach was used to evaluate the ability of each to sensitize GIST cells to IM.
  • RESULTS: Thirty-eight genes were expressed at significantly lower levels in the pre-treatment samples of tumors that rapidly responded to IM.
  • Importantly, ten KRAB-ZNF genes mapped to a single locus on chromosome 19p, and a subset of these predicted likely response to IM-based therapy in a naïve panel of GISTs.

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  • (PMID = 27963885.001).
  • [ISSN] 1527-7755
  • [Journal-full-title] Journal of clinical oncology : official journal of the American Society of Clinical Oncology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] J. Clin. Oncol.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] United States
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97. Yamamoto M, Ishida T: The evaluation of peritoneal lavage tumor markers for gastric cancer. J Clin Oncol; 2009 May 20;27(15_suppl):e15643

  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] The evaluation of peritoneal lavage tumor markers for gastric cancer.
  • : e15643 Background: We have found that elevation of preoperative peritoneal lavage CEA levels is associated with an earlier detection of recurrent peritoneal dissemination and a poor prognosis.
  • Ninety-four patients who were underwent surgery with gastric cancer were intraoperatively measured for tumor markers, CEA, CA125 and CA72-4 in peritoneal lavage using a chemiluminescent enzyme immunoassay.
  • We examined whether the stage with patients were related with tumor markers in peritoneal lavage.

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  • (PMID = 27962737.001).
  • [ISSN] 1527-7755
  • [Journal-full-title] Journal of clinical oncology : official journal of the American Society of Clinical Oncology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] J. Clin. Oncol.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] United States
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98. Gronlund B, Hgdall EV, Christensen IJ, Johansen JS, Norgaard-Pedersen B, Engelholm SA, Hogdall C: Pre-treatment prediction of chemoresistance in second-line chemotherapy of ovarian carcinoma: value of serological tumor marker determination (tetranectin, YKL-40, CASA, CA 125). Int J Biol Markers; 2006 Jul - Sep;21(3):141-148

  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] Pre-treatment prediction of chemoresistance in second-line chemotherapy of ovarian carcinoma: value of serological tumor marker determination (tetranectin, YKL-40, CASA, CA 125).
  • OBJECTIVE: To examine if the determination of the levels of serological tumor markers at time of relapse had any predictive value for chemoresistance in the second-line treatment of ovarian cancer patients.
  • METHODS: From a registry of consecutive single-institution patients with epithelial ovarian carcinoma pretreated with paclitaxel plus platinum, we selected 82 patients with (a) solid tumor recurrence, and (b) second-line chemotherapy consisting of topotecan (platinum-resistant disease) or paclitaxel plus carboplatin (platinum-sensitive disease).
  • Stored serum samples were analyzed for the biochemical tumor markers tetranectin, YKL-40, CASA (cancer-associated serum antigen), and CA 125.
  • The serum tumor marker levels at time of relapse were correlated with response status at landmark time after 4 cycles of second-line chemotherapy.
  • Univariate and multivariate logistic regression analyses (chemoresistant vs non-chemoresistant disease) were performed.
  • In univariate logistic regression analysis, the tumor markers tetranectin (OR 0.4; 95% CI: 0.2-0.8; p=0.008), YKL-40 (OR 1.8; 95% CI: 1.0-3.3; p=0.045), and CASA (OR 1.8; 95% CI: 1.2-2.7; p=0.007) had predictive value for second-line chemoresistance, whereas serum CA 125 had no predictive value.

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  • (PMID = 28207151.001).
  • [ISSN] 1724-6008
  • [Journal-full-title] The International journal of biological markers
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Int. J. Biol. Markers
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] Italy
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99. Liang H, Ye F, Lembersky BC, Bhargava R: Correlation of WT1 expression with tumor characteristics and clinical outcomes in mucinous breast carcinoma. J Clin Oncol; 2009 May 20;27(15_suppl):e22075

  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] Correlation of WT1 expression with tumor characteristics and clinical outcomes in mucinous breast carcinoma.
  • : e22075 Background: Wilms' tumor 1(WT1) protein expression has been evaluated by immunohistochemistry (IHC) in various histologies of series of invasive breast carcinomas.
  • Patient age, tumor features, management, and clinical outcomes were recorded, and survival was documented at the last patient followup.
  • Only 3 patients had HER2-positive tumors.
  • Disease free survival (DFS) was 92%.
  • Among them, WT1 expression was identified in 21/33 (64%) of pure mucinous carcinomas and 9/31 (29%) of mixed type tumors.
  • However, patients in the WT1-positive group were older (median age 74 vs 55 years, p=0.02) and had smaller tumor (median tumor size 1.2 vs 1.75 cm, p=0.03) as compared to those in WT1-negative group.
  • More patients with WT1-negative tumors received adjuvant chemotherapy (40.6% vs 13.8%, p=0.02).
  • Although all the recurrences were observed in patients with WT1-negative tumors, there was no statistical association of DFS or OS with WT1 expression.

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  • (PMID = 27963217.001).
  • [ISSN] 1527-7755
  • [Journal-full-title] Journal of clinical oncology : official journal of the American Society of Clinical Oncology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] J. Clin. Oncol.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] United States
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100. Foster R, Ehrlich Y, Ulbright TM, Cheng L, Bihrle R, Beck SD, Andreoiu M, Brames MJ, Einhorn LH: Malignant transformation of teratoma to primitive neuroectodermal tumor (PNET): Outcome analysis with retroperitoneal lymph node dissection and PNET specific chemotherapy. J Clin Oncol; 2009 May 20;27(15_suppl):5081

  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] Malignant transformation of teratoma to primitive neuroectodermal tumor (PNET): Outcome analysis with retroperitoneal lymph node dissection and PNET specific chemotherapy.
  • : 5081 Background: Malignant transformation of teratoma to PNET is a rare entity.
  • Surgical resection has been the mainstay of therapy because these tumors are not curable with cisplatin based chemotherapy.
  • 27 pts presented with clinical stage I disease.
  • 4 are dead of disease (DOD).
  • 48 pts presented with metastatic disease.
  • 20 are DOD, 24 have no evidence of disease (NED) and 4 are alive with disease.
  • 50 of 75 pts had PNET documented metastasis with an estimated 5 years disease specific survival of 47%.
  • 10 of these were treated with PNET specific chemotherapy for unresectable disease.
  • CONCLUSIONS: Malignant transformation of teratoma to PNET carries an adverse prognosis.
  • PNET specific chemotherapy, adjuvant to RPLND or for treatment of unresectable disease followed by surgery, may result in long-term survival and potential cure.

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  • (PMID = 27964284.001).
  • [ISSN] 1527-7755
  • [Journal-full-title] Journal of clinical oncology : official journal of the American Society of Clinical Oncology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] J. Clin. Oncol.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] United States
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