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Items 1 to 100 of about 296829
1. Huang JH, Zhang SN, Choi KJ, Choi IK, Kim JH, Lee M, Kim H, Yun CO: Therapeutic and Tumor-specific Immunity Induced by Combination of Dendritic Cells and Oncolytic Adenovirus Expressing IL-12 and 4-1BBL. Mol Ther; 2010 Feb;18(2):264-274
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  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] Therapeutic and Tumor-specific Immunity Induced by Combination of Dendritic Cells and Oncolytic Adenovirus Expressing IL-12 and 4-1BBL.
  • : Recently, gene-based cytokine treatment has been actively pursued as a new promising approach in treating cancer.
  • Moreover, enhanced type-1 antitumor immune response and higher migratory abilities of DCs in tumors were also observed in the combination arms.

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  • [Copyright] Copyright © 2010 The American Society of Gene & Cell Therapy. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.
  • (PMID = 28182938.001).
  • [ISSN] 1525-0024
  • [Journal-full-title] Molecular therapy : the journal of the American Society of Gene Therapy
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Mol. Ther.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] United States
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2. Kottke T, Galivo F, Wongthida P, Maria Diaz R, Thompson J, Jevremovic D, Barber GN, Hall G, Chester J, Selby P, Harrington K, Melcher A, Vile RG: Treg Depletion-enhanced IL-2 Treatment Facilitates Therapy of Established Tumors Using Systemically Delivered Oncolytic Virus. Mol Ther; 2008 Jul;16(7):1217-1226

  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] Treg Depletion-enhanced IL-2 Treatment Facilitates Therapy of Established Tumors Using Systemically Delivered Oncolytic Virus.
  • : There are several roadblocks that hinder systemic delivery of oncolytic viruses to the sites of metastatic disease.
  • These include the tumor vasculature, which provides a physical barrier to tumor-specific virus extravasation.
  • Although interleukin-2 (IL-2) has been used in antitumor therapy, it is associated with endothelial cell injury, leading to vascular leak syndrome (VLS).
  • Here, we demonstrate that IL-2-mediated VLS, accentuated by depletion of regulatory T cells (Treg), facilitates localization of intravenously (IV) delivered oncolytic virus into established tumors in immune-competent mice.
  • IL-2, in association with Treg depletion, generates "hyperactivated" natural killer (NK) cells, possessing antitumor activity and secreting factors that facilitate virus spread/replication throughout the tumor by disrupting the tumor architecture.
  • As a result, the combination of Treg depletion/IL-2 and systemic oncolytic virotherapy was found to be significantly more therapeutic against established disease than either treatment alone.
  • These data demonstrate that it is possible to combine biological therapy with oncolytic virotherapy to generate systemic therapy against established tumors.

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  • [Copyright] Copyright © 2008 The American Society of Gene Therapy. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.
  • (PMID = 28178481.001).
  • [ISSN] 1525-0024
  • [Journal-full-title] Molecular therapy : the journal of the American Society of Gene Therapy
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Mol. Ther.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] United States
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3. Haroon M, Kwong WY, Cantwell B, Walker F: A case of cetuximab-related tumour lysis syndrome in metastatic rectal carcinoma. NDT Plus; 2010 Jun;3(3):271-272

  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] A case of cetuximab-related tumour lysis syndrome in metastatic rectal carcinoma.
  • He had the first session of a combined therapy with cetuximab and 5-fluorouracil (5-FU) in March 2009; however, soon afterwards, he presented with the symptoms, signs and biochemistry suggestive of tumour lysis syndrome.
  • Our unusual case highlights that tumour lysis syndrome can also develop in 'low risk' category tumours, and that clinicians should be vigilant in identifying at-risk patients.

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  • (PMID = 28657052.001).
  • [ISSN] 1753-0784
  • [Journal-full-title] NDT plus
  • [ISO-abbreviation] NDT Plus
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] England
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4. Terada T: Endometriosis of the Vermiform Appendix Presenting as a Tumor. Gastroenterology Res; 2009 Dec;2(6):353-355
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  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] Endometriosis of the Vermiform Appendix Presenting as a Tumor.
  • Most patients with this disease are asymptomatic or present as acute or chronic appendicitis.
  • The author herein reports a case of appendiceal endometriosis presenting as a tumor at the appendiceal oriffice.
  • A colon endoscopy showed a tumor in the appendiceal orifice.
  • Two biopsies of the tumor showed no remarkable changes.
  • Imaging modalities including CT and MRI also revealed an appendiceal tumor.
  • Resection of appendix, cecum, ascending colon, terminal ileum, and 16 lymph nodes were performed under the clinical diagnosis of gastrointestinal stromal tumor.
  • Grossly, a tumor measuring 3 x 3 x 3 cm was recognized in the appendiceral orifice.
  • Histologically, the tumor was endometriosis consisting of islands of endometrial glands and stroma.
  • The present case suggests that appendiceal endometriosis may present as a tumor.

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  • (PMID = 27990206.001).
  • [ISSN] 1918-2805
  • [Journal-full-title] Gastroenterology research
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Gastroenterology Res
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] Canada
  • [Keywords] NOTNLM ; Appendix / Endometriosis / Lymph nodes
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5. Tanaka F, Yoneda K, Hasegawa S: Circulating tumor cells (CTCs) in lung cancer: current status and future perspectives. Lung Cancer (Auckl); 2010;1:77-84

  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] Circulating tumor cells (CTCs) in lung cancer: current status and future perspectives.
  • Circulating tumor cells (CTCs) are tumor cells that are shed from the primary site and circulate in the peripheral blood, and recent studies have shown that CTCs can be useful clinical markers in some solid tumors such as those of breast cancer.

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  • (PMID = 28210108.001).
  • [Journal-full-title] Lung Cancer (Auckland, N.Z.)
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Lung Cancer (Auckl)
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Review
  • [Publication-country] New Zealand
  • [Keywords] NOTNLM ; CTC-chip / cellsearch / metastasis / tumor cells
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6. Ayerra AQ, Mena EP, Fabregas JP, Miguelez CG, Guedea F: HDR and LDR Brachytherapy in the Treatment of Lip Cancer: the Experience of the Catalan Institute of Oncology. J Contemp Brachytherapy; 2010 Mar;2(1):9-13

  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] HDR and LDR Brachytherapy in the Treatment of Lip Cancer: the Experience of the Catalan Institute of Oncology.
  • RESULTS: The most common cell type was squamous cell carcinoma (115 cases; 95%) and most tumors were located on the lower lip (107 patients; 88.4%).
  • After 15 years of follow-up, overall survival was 89.5%, cause-specific survival 97.8%, and disease-free survival 86.6%.

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  • (PMID = 28031737.001).
  • [ISSN] 1689-832X
  • [Journal-full-title] Journal of contemporary brachytherapy
  • [ISO-abbreviation] J Contemp Brachytherapy
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] Poland
  • [Keywords] NOTNLM ; brachytherapy / lip cancer / radiotherapy dosage
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7. Kampschreur LM, Hoogeveen EK, Op den Akker JW, Beutler JJ, Beems T, Dorresteijn LDA, de Sévaux RGL: A haemodialysis patient with back pain: brown tumour as a cause of spinal cord compression under cinacalcet therapy. NDT Plus; 2010 Jun;3(3):291-295

  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] A haemodialysis patient with back pain: brown tumour as a cause of spinal cord compression under cinacalcet therapy.
  • Laboratory tests showed severe hyperparathyroidism [intact parathyroid hormone (iPTH) 69 pmol/L; reference range: 1.3-6.8 pmol/L], hypercalcaemia (2.79 mmol/L), hyperphosphataemia (1.6 mmol/L) and elevated serum total alkaline phosphatase (200 U/L).
  • Magnetic resonance imaging showed a tumour that severely compressed the myelum of the thoracic spine.
  • Histological investigation revealed a brown tumour or osteoclastoma, an erosive bony lesion caused by increased osteoclastic activity and peritrabecular fibrosis.
  • A brown tumour is a benign tumour that is a rare complication of severe renal hyperparathyroidism.
  • The brown tumour developed despite a 1-year treatment of the patient with cinacalcet, which, however, did not result in a major decrease in serum iPTH concentration (from 110 to 69 pmol/L: 37% reduction).

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  • (PMID = 28657067.001).
  • [ISSN] 1753-0784
  • [Journal-full-title] NDT plus
  • [ISO-abbreviation] NDT Plus
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] England
  • [Keywords] NOTNLM ; brown tumour / hyperparathyroidism / osteoclastoma / spine
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8. Shuto T, Inomori S, Fujino H, Nagano H, Hasegawa N, Kakuta Y: Cyst formation following gamma knife surgery for intracranial meningioma. J Neurosurg; 2005 Jan;102(s_supplement):134-139

  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] Cyst formation following gamma knife surgery for intracranial meningioma.
  • OBJECT: The authors conducted a study to evaluate the clinical significance of cyst formation or enlargement after gamma knife surgery (GKS) for intracranial benign meningiomas.
  • METHODS: The medical records of 160 patients with 184 tumors were examined for those with follow-up data of more than 2 years among 270 patients who underwent GKS for intracranial meningiomas between February 1992 and November 2001.
  • Cyst formation or enlargement following GKS was observed in five patients, one man and four women (mean age 61.2 years).
  • The tumor location was the sphenoid ridge in one case, petroclival in two, tentorium in one, and parasagittal region in one.
  • The mean tumor volume was 10.5 cm<sup>3</sup>, the mean margin dose was 13.4 Gy (median 14 Gy), and the mean maximum dose was 27.5 Gy (median 24.1 Gy).
  • At the time of GKS three tumors were associated with cyst, of which two enlarged after radiosurgery.
  • Three cysts developed de novo after GKS.
  • Three of the five patients needed surgery to treat the cyst formation or enlargement.
  • Histological examination demonstrated various findings such as tumor necrosis, proliferation of small vessels, vascular obliteration, and hemosiderin deposits.
  • CONCLUSIONS: New cyst formation following GKS for benign intracranial meningioma is relatively rare; however, both preexisting and newly developed cysts tend to enlarge after GKS and often require surgery.

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  • (PMID = 28306456.001).
  • [ISSN] 1933-0693
  • [Journal-full-title] Journal of neurosurgery
  • [ISO-abbreviation] J. Neurosurg.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] United States
  • [Keywords] NOTNLM ; cyst / gamma knife surgery / meningioma
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9. Boman BM, Wicha MS, Fields JZ, Runquist OA: Symmetric Division of Cancer Stem Cells - a Key Mechanism in Tumor Growth that should be Targeted in Future Therapeutic Approaches. Clin Pharmacol Ther; 2007 Jun;81(6):893-898

  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] Symmetric Division of Cancer Stem Cells - a Key Mechanism in Tumor Growth that should be Targeted in Future Therapeutic Approaches.
  • As cancer stem cells (SCs) drive tumor growth, it is only through the elimination of those cancer SCs that a pharmacologic cure can be attained.
  • We used computer modeling to determine which changes could give rise to exponential increases in both SC and non-SC populations in CRC.
  • This finding suggests that any systemic therapies designed to effectively treat CRC and other cancers must act to control or eliminate symmetrical cancer SC division in tumors, while minimally affecting normal SC division in non-tumor tissues.

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  • [Copyright] © 2007 American Society for Clinical Pharmacology and Therapeutics.
  • (PMID = 28547902.001).
  • [ISSN] 1532-6535
  • [Journal-full-title] Clinical pharmacology and therapeutics
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Clin. Pharmacol. Ther.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] United States
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10. Huffmann BC, Reinacher PC, Gilsbach JM: Gamma knife surgery for atypical meningiomas. J Neurosurg; 2005 Jan;102(s_supplement):283-286

  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • OBJECT: Complete resection is the optimal treatment for atypical meningiomas (AMs) but its feasibility depends on the tumor site.
  • Four patients had residual lesions and 10 patients had recurrent tumors after one or more microsurgical interventions.
  • Three patients were treated twice with GKS because of tumor tissue outside the treatment volume, either at the margin or at a distant location.
  • Ten tumors shrank 6 to 12 months after GKS, 10 remained stable, and one grew.
  • CONCLUSIONS: After early tumor shrinkage, high recurrence rates were demonstrated both at the treatment margin and at distant locations in cases treated for AM.

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  • (PMID = 28306448.001).
  • [ISSN] 1933-0693
  • [Journal-full-title] Journal of neurosurgery
  • [ISO-abbreviation] J. Neurosurg.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] United States
  • [Keywords] NOTNLM ; atypical meningioma / gamma knife surgery / radiosurgery
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11. Fijolek J, Wiatr E, Rowinska-Zakrzewska E, Giedronowicz D, Langfort R, Chabowski M, Orlowski T, Roszkowski K: p53 and HER2/neu expression in relation to chemotherapy response in patients with non-small cell lung cancer. Int J Biol Markers; 2006 Apr-Jun;21(2):81-87

  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] p53 and HER2/neu expression in relation to chemotherapy response in patients with non-small cell lung cancer.
  • : The aim of the study was to investigate a relation between p53 and HER2/neu expression in resected lung tumors and the response of those tumors to neoadjuvant chemotherapy.
  • The study population included 67 consecutive patients with non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) in stage II or III who were operated on at the Institute of Tuberculosis, Warsaw, Poland, between 20 April 2001 and 10 March 2003.
  • The response to therapy was assessed as complete response (CR), partial response (PR), stable disease (SD) or progressive disease (PD), on the basis of CT scans performed before and after neoadjuvant chemotherapy. p53 and HER2/neu protein expression were evaluated by immunohistochemistry (IHC) using antibodies against p53 (clone PAb 1801, Novocastra) and against HER2/neu (Dako) in paraffin-embedded specimens of tumors.
  • A response to therapy (CR+PR) was observed in 27 patients, while 40 patients (SD+PD) were regarded as resistant to therapy.
  • Resistance was observed significantly more often in tumors above 3 cm in diameter. p53 expression was found in 16 tumors (23.9%) and HER2/neu in 26 tumors (38.8%).
  • We observed a nonsignificant tendency to chemoresistance in tumors with HER-2/neu overexpression and also in tumors with p53 overexpression.
  • This significance was independent of tumor size.

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  • (PMID = 28207130.001).
  • [ISSN] 1724-6008
  • [Journal-full-title] The International journal of biological markers
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Int. J. Biol. Markers
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] Italy
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12. Long Y, Fessler JA, Balter JM: Accuracy estimation for projection-to-volume targeting during rotational therapy: A feasibility study. Med Phys; 2010 Jun;37(6Part1):2480-2490

  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • PURPOSE: Estimating motion and deformation parameters from a series of projection radiographs acquired during arc therapy using a reference CT volume has become a promising technique for targeting treatment.
  • METHODS: The projection-to-volume alignment procedure used a nonrigid model to describe motion in thorax area, a cost function consisting of a least-squared error metric and a simple regularizer that encourages local invertibility, and a four-level multiresolution scheme with a conjugate gradient method to optimize the cost function.
  • CONCLUSIONS: There is potentially sufficient information present in a small spread of projections to monitor the configuration of reasonably high contrast tumors without implanted markers.

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  • [Copyright] © 2010 American Association of Physicists in Medicine.
  • (PMID = 28512939.001).
  • [ISSN] 2473-4209
  • [Journal-full-title] Medical physics
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Med Phys
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] United States
  • [Keywords] NOTNLM ; Cancer / Computed radiography / Computed tomography / Cone beam computed tomography / Interpolation / Lungs / Medical image reconstruction / Medical imaging / Radiation therapy / Radiography / Therapeutic applications, including brachytherapy / X-ray detectors / arc therapy / computerised tomography / cone-beam projection / conjugate gradient methods / diagnostic radiography / medical image processing / motion estimation / nonrigid image registration / pneumodynamics / radiation therapy / tumours
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13. Bal A, Mohan H, Chabbra S, Sood S: Causes of enucleation in Northern India (1995-2005). Eur J Ophthalmol; 2007 Jul-Aug;17:638-641

  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • RESULTS: Between January 1995 and June 2005, there were 139,092 outpatients, 6,574 hospital admissions, 12,044 ophthalmic operations, and a total of 48 enucleations in 47 patients.
  • On histopathologic examination, the lesions were categorized into two broad groups: neoplastic (8 cases, 16.6%) and non-neoplastic (40 cases, 83.4%).
  • CONCLUSIONS: In our setting, non-neoplastic lesions are the main cause of eyeball surgery, as compared to the West, where trauma followed by neoplasms constitute important causes.

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  • (PMID = 28221561.001).
  • [ISSN] 1724-6016
  • [Journal-full-title] European journal of ophthalmology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Eur J Ophthalmol
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] Italy
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14. Bouchat V, Nuttens VE, Lucas S, Michiels C, Masereel B, Féron O, Gallez B, Borght TV: Radioimmunotherapy with radioactive nanoparticles: First results of dosimetry for vascularized and necrosed solid tumors. Med Phys; 2007 Nov;34(11):4504-4513

  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] Radioimmunotherapy with radioactive nanoparticles: First results of dosimetry for vascularized and necrosed solid tumors.
  • The aim of this paper is to assess, by means of MCNPX simulations, the doses delivered around and throughout a solid tumor when the radioactive atom linked to each antibody is replaced by a 5nm diameter nanoparticle composed of numerous radionuclides.
  • A new model for a spherical vascularized tumor has been developed in which the antibody distributions inside the tumor can be uniform or heterogeneous.
  • It is also possible to simulate a central necrotic core inside the tumor where the concentration of radiolabeled antibodies is assumed to be zero.
  • Moreover, with a total activity of 5 and 34MBq for tumor radii of 0.5 and 1.0cm, respectively, viable tumor cells can receive doses of up to 50Gy, even if high nonuniformity of the total activity is observed in the tumor.

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  • [Copyright] © 2007 American Association of Physicists in Medicine.
  • (PMID = 28523697.001).
  • [ISSN] 2473-4209
  • [Journal-full-title] Medical physics
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Med Phys
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] United States
  • [Keywords] NOTNLM ; Cancer / Dosimetry / Drug delivery / Monte Carlo / Monte Carlo methods / Nanoparticles / Nanotechnologies-applications / Nanotechnologies-design / Ozone / Radiation therapy equipment / Radiation treatment / Radioactivity / Therapeutic applications, including brachytherapy / Therapeutics / Tissues / cancer / dosimetry / nanomedicine / nanoparticles / nanotechnology / radiation therapy / radioimmunotherapy / radioisotopes / tumor model / tumours / yttrium compounds
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15. Tago M, Terahara A, Shin M, Maruyama K, Kurita H, Nakagawa K, Ohtomo K: Gamma knife surgery for hemangioblastomas. J Neurosurg; 2005 Jan;102(s_supplement):171-174

  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • Seven patients had von Hippel-Lindau disease.
  • The median and mean tumor volumes were 0.23 cm<sup>3</sup> and 0.72 cm<sup>3</sup> respectively (range 0.004:4.84 cm<sup>3</sup>).
  • Twenty-eight tumors received 20 Gy to the margin, and the remainder received 18 Gy.
  • Only one tumor increased in volume 24 months after treatment in association with an intratumoral hemorrhage.
  • The tumor control rate was 97.4% (37 of 38 tumors).
  • New lesions and/or those increasing in size outside the irradiated area were discovered in five patients (38.5%).
  • Nine tumors revealed peritumoral contrast enhancement which was seen more frequently in larger tumors with a volume greater than 0.5 cm<sup>3</sup> (p = 0.0034).
  • Higher doses and smaller tumors probably contribute to good outcomes.
  • Peritumoral contrast enhancement may be seen in larger tumors.
  • The authors recommend regular imaging follow up and early repeated treatment in the face of new or growing tumors.

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  • (PMID = 28306464.001).
  • [ISSN] 1933-0693
  • [Journal-full-title] Journal of neurosurgery
  • [ISO-abbreviation] J. Neurosurg.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] United States
  • [Keywords] NOTNLM ; gamma knife surgery / hemangioblastoma / stereotactic radiosurgery / von Hippel-Lindau disease
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16. Vlad RM, Kolios MC, Moseley JL, Czarnota GJ, Brock KK: Evaluating the extent of cell death in 3D high frequency ultrasound by registration with whole-mount tumor histopathologya). Med Phys; 2010 Aug;37(8):4288-4297

  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] Evaluating the extent of cell death in 3D high frequency ultrasound by registration with whole-mount tumor histopathologya).
  • PURPOSE: High frequency ultrasound imaging, 10-30 MHz, has the capability to assess tumor response to radiotherapy in mouse tumors as early as 24 h after treatment administration.
  • Ultrasound images were collected from each tumor before and 24 h after exposure to radiation using a broadband 25 MHz center frequency transducer.
  • After radiotherapy, tumors exhibited hyperechoic regions in ultrasound images that corresponded to areas of cell death in histology.
  • The tumors and regions of cell death were manually outlined on histological images.
  • Similarly, the tumors and hyperechoic regions were outlined on the ultrasound images.
  • RESULTS: A shrinkage factor of 17±2% was calculated from the difference in the tumor volumes evaluated from histological and ultrasound images.
  • This was used to correct the tumor and cell death volumes assessed from histology.
  • It was applied here to evaluate the capability of ultrasound imaging to assess early tumor response to radiotherapy in mouse tumors.
  • Similarly, it can be applied in the future to evaluate the capability of ultrasound imaging to assess early tumor response to other modalities of cancer treatment.
  • This provides a foundation for future developments regarding the use of ultrasound in preclinical and clinical applications to adapt treatments based on tumor response to cancer therapy.

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  • [Copyright] © 2010 American Association of Physicists in Medicine.
  • (PMID = 28524311.001).
  • [ISSN] 2473-4209
  • [Journal-full-title] Medical physics
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Med Phys
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] United States
  • [Keywords] NOTNLM ; Biomedical instrumentation and transducers, including micro-electro-mechanical systems (MEMS) / Cancer / Cell growth / Dosimetry / Image reconstruction / Image registration / Medical image reconstruction / Medical imaging / Radiation therapy / Registration / Therapeutic applications, including brachytherapy / Tissues / Ultrasonographic imaging / Ultrasonography / biomedical transducers / biomedical ultrasonics / cellular effects of radiation / finite element modeling / image registration / medical image processing / physiological models / radiation therapy / registration / tumor response / tumours / ultrasonic transducers / ultrasound / whole-mount tumor histopathology
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17. Aristophanous M, Penney BC, Pelizzari CA: The development and testing of a digital PET phantom for the evaluation of tumor volume segmentation techniques. Med Phys; 2008 Jul;35(7Part1):3331-3342

  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] The development and testing of a digital PET phantom for the evaluation of tumor volume segmentation techniques.
  • Methods for accurate tumor volume segmentation of positron emission tomography (PET) images have been under investigation in recent years partly as a result of the increased use of PET in radiation treatment planning (RTP).
  • The authors have constructed a digital tumor phantom to address this need.
  • Synthetic tumors were placed in the lung of the Zubal phantom to provide the targets for segmentation.
  • The authors measured statistical quantities to compare image intensity distributions from regions-of-interest (ROIs) placed in the liver, the lungs, and tumors in phantom and clinical reconstructions.
  • Finally, they investigate and quantify the relationship between the threshold required to segment a tumor and the inhomogeneity of the tumor's image intensity distribution.
  • The tests and various measurements performed in this study demonstrate how the phantom can offer a reliable way of testing and investigating tumor volume segmentation in PET.

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  • [Copyright] © 2008 American Association of Physicists in Medicine.
  • (PMID = 28513024.001).
  • [ISSN] 2473-4209
  • [Journal-full-title] Medical physics
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Med Phys
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] United States
  • [Keywords] NOTNLM ; Anatomy / Cancer / Computed tomography / Computer software / Design / General statistical methods / Liver / Lungs / Medical image noise / Medical imaging / Positron emission tomography / Positron emission tomography (PET) / Segmentation / Semiconductor device fabrication / cancer / digital phantom / image segmentation / image texture / lung / medical image processing / phantoms / positron emission tomography / radiation therapy / statistical analysis / tumor volume segmentation / tumours
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18. Van den Wyngaert T, Huizing MT, Fossion E, Vermorken JB: Scintigraphic evaluation of mandibular bone turnover inhibition by bisphosphonates in patients with solid tumors. J Clin Oncol; 2009 May 20;27(15_suppl):9519

  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] Scintigraphic evaluation of mandibular bone turnover inhibition by bisphosphonates in patients with solid tumors.
  • Patients with skeletal metastases from a solid tumor (n=40) were individually matched with cancer patients without BP exposure (n=40) and controls with neither a malignancy nor BP use (n=40).
  • The mean MBT was significantly lower in BP using cancer patients (2.59) compared with matched controls from oncological patients without BP use 3.01 (difference 0.42; 95% CI 0.13 - 0.72; p=0.006), or patients without cancer or BP exposure 3.09 (difference 0.50; 95% CI 0.21 - 0.78; p=0.001).
  • In contrast, there was no significant difference in MBT between non-BP users (difference 0.08; 95% CI -0.31 - 0.46; p=0.7).

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  • (PMID = 27964493.001).
  • [ISSN] 1527-7755
  • [Journal-full-title] Journal of clinical oncology : official journal of the American Society of Clinical Oncology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] J. Clin. Oncol.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] United States
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19. Lai R Sr, Feng L, Liu L, Xie L, Wu X, Zhang S, Tang X, Geng J, Chen T: The clinical pathogensis significance associated with mutation of APC MCR in colorectal neoplasms. J Clin Oncol; 2009 May 20;27(15_suppl):e15119

  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] The clinical pathogensis significance associated with mutation of APC MCR in colorectal neoplasms.
  • : e15119 Background: To explore the clinical pathogensis evalution of codon 1493,1367 and 1328 mutations in MCR (mutation cluster region) of exon 15 of APC (Adenomatous polyposis coli) gene in cases of colorectal neoplasm and the family history.

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  • (PMID = 27960846.001).
  • [ISSN] 1527-7755
  • [Journal-full-title] Journal of clinical oncology : official journal of the American Society of Clinical Oncology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] J. Clin. Oncol.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] United States
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20. Karantza-Wadsworth V, Stein M, Tan A, Mehnert J, Poplin E, Lin Y, White E, DiPaola RS: Rationally designed treatment for solid tumors with MAPK pathway activation. J Clin Oncol; 2009 May 20;27(15_suppl):2532

  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] Rationally designed treatment for solid tumors with MAPK pathway activation.
  • : 2532 Background: Preclinical studies shed light to the mechanism conferring paclitaxel resistance in solid tumors with active Ras/Raf/Mitogen-Activated Protein Kinase (MAPK) pathway, and determined a molecular mechanism by which addition of the proteasome inhibitor bortezomib abrogated this resistance, enabling tumor regression in animals in vivo.
  • Sixteen patients with refractory solid tumors were treated with weekly paclitaxel and bortezomib.
  • Of 15 evaluable patients, 1 patient with paclitaxel-resistant NSCLC had PR and 5 patients (2, NSCLC; 1, pancreatic; 1, colon; 1, ovarian) had stable disease.
  • Paclitaxel PK parameters are being determined, and paraffin-embedded tumor specimens are being evaluated for MAPK pathway activation by IHC for phospho-ERK.

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  • (PMID = 27961854.001).
  • [ISSN] 1527-7755
  • [Journal-full-title] Journal of clinical oncology : official journal of the American Society of Clinical Oncology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] J. Clin. Oncol.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] United States
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21. Matsuda R, Yoshikawa M, Kimura H, Ouji Y, Nakase H, Nishimura F, Nonaka JI, Toriumi H, Yamada S, Nishiofuku M, Moriya K, Ishizaka S, Nakamura M, Sakaki T: Cotransplantation of Mouse Embryonic Stem Cells and Bone Marrow Stromal Cells following Spinal Cord Injury Suppresses Tumor Development. Cell Transplant; 2009 Jan;18(1):39-54

  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] Cotransplantation of Mouse Embryonic Stem Cells and Bone Marrow Stromal Cells following Spinal Cord Injury Suppresses Tumor Development.
  • Embryonic stem (ES) cells are a potential source for treatment of spinal cord injury (SCI).
  • Although one of the main problems of ES cell-based cell therapy is tumor formation, there is no ideal method to suppress tumor development.
  • In this study, we examined whether transplantation with bone marrow stromal cells (BMSCs) prevented tumor formation in SCI model mice that received ES cell-derived grafts containing both undifferentiated ES cells and neural stem cells.
  • Embryoid bodies (EBs) formed in 4-day hanging drop cultures were treated with retinoic acid (RA) at a low concentration of 5 × 10<sup>-9</sup> M for 4 days, in order to allow some of the ES cells to remain in an undifferentiated state.
  • RA-treated EBs were enzymatically digested into single cells and used as ES cell-derived graft cells.
  • Mice transplanted with ES cell-derived graft cells alone developed tumors at the grafted site and behavioral improvement ceased after day 21.
  • In contrast, no tumor development was observed in mice cotransplanted with BMSCs, which also showed sustained behavioral improvement.
  • These results suggest that BMSCs induce undifferentiated ES cells to differentiate into a neuronal lineage by neurotrophic factor production, resulting in suppression of tumor formation.
  • Cotransplantation of BMSCs with ES cell-derived graft cells may be useful for preventing the development of ES cell-derived tumors.

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  • (PMID = 28841348.001).
  • [ISSN] 1555-3892
  • [Journal-full-title] Cell transplantation
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Cell Transplant
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] United States
  • [Keywords] NOTNLM ; Bone marrow stromal cells / Cotransplantation / Embryonic stem cells / Spinal cord injury / Tumor suppression
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22. Herchenhorn D, Souza AL, Souza AM, Boasquevisque ET, Boasquevisque EM, Dias FL, Small I, Knust R: Prognostic impact of radiology response and tumor volume among patients with locally advanced squamous cell carcinoma of the head and neck (LASCHNC) treated with concomitant chemoradiation. J Clin Oncol; 2009 May 20;27(15_suppl):e17035

  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] Prognostic impact of radiology response and tumor volume among patients with locally advanced squamous cell carcinoma of the head and neck (LASCHNC) treated with concomitant chemoradiation.
  • Tumor volume as well as post-treatment CT radiology response have been studied in small retrospective series.
  • An analysis of tumor volume and CT radiology response-score to endoscopic and pathologic responses as well as disease free survival was performed.
  • Tumor volume was measured by multiplying the longest diameter by 0,523. (Cancer Res Clin Oncol.
  • 2005), CT post-treatment changes score used as proposed by Pamejier et al., using a 3-point CT-score: 1 = expected post-treatment changes; 2 = focal mass with a maximal diameter of < 1 cm and/or asymmetric obliteration of laryngeal tissue planes; 3 = focal mass with a diameter of > 1 cm, or < 50% estimated tumor volume reduction.
  • RESULTS: Median tumor volume (mTV) was 21cm3 (0.3 to 178), median disease free survival (mDFS) in pts with tumor volume greater than mTV was 20.4 months and not reached in patients with tumor volume lower than mTV, log-rank 5.9, p = 0.015.
  • The median tumor volume reduction by CT was 84% (-62 a 100%), 8pts were classified as score 1 (23.5%), 1pt score 2 (2.9%), 25pts score 3 (73%).
  • CONCLUSIONS: There is a great variability in TV in LASCHNC, small tumor volumes were related to longer DFS and there is no correlation between tumor reduction and post-treatment CT score.

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  • (PMID = 27961799.001).
  • [ISSN] 1527-7755
  • [Journal-full-title] Journal of clinical oncology : official journal of the American Society of Clinical Oncology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] J. Clin. Oncol.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] United States
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23. Kang B Sr, Lee J, Ryu M, Im S, Park S, Kang W, Kim T, Oh D, Jung K, Kang Y: A phase II study of imatinib mesylate as adjuvant treatment for curatively resected high-risk localized gastrointestinal stromal tumors. J Clin Oncol; 2009 May 20;27(15_suppl):e21515

  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] A phase II study of imatinib mesylate as adjuvant treatment for curatively resected high-risk localized gastrointestinal stromal tumors.
  • : e21515 Background: In our previous study, the presence of c-kit mutation as well as tumor size and mitotic count was an independent poor risk factor for relapse after curative resection of primary localized GIST.
  • The patients with all the 3 poor risk factors had only 30% of 2 year relapse free survival rate (RFSR). (Kim, et al.
  • Therefore, the patients who have primary localized GISTs with large size, high mitotic count, and c-kit exon 11 mutation may be the best candidate of adjuvant imatinib treatment.
  • METHODS: Patients who underwent complete resection of a primary GIST with 1) c-kit exon 11 mutation, and 2) ≥10 mitoses/50 HPF, or tumor size ≥10 cm, or ≥5 mitoses/50 HPF and tumor size ≥5 cm were eligible.
  • Patients received imatinib 400mg p.o. daily until recurrence of disease, intolerable toxicities, or for 2 years.
  • Median primary tumor size was 7.5cm and median mitoses index was 12/50 HPF.

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  • (PMID = 27963446.001).
  • [ISSN] 1527-7755
  • [Journal-full-title] Journal of clinical oncology : official journal of the American Society of Clinical Oncology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] J. Clin. Oncol.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] United States
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24. Schoot RA, Bleeker G, Heij HA, van Eck BL, Caron HN, de Kraker J: The role of 131-I-metaiodobenzylguanidine (&lt;sup&gt;13I&lt;/sup&gt;I-MIBG) therapy in irresectable and compromising localized neuroblastoma. J Clin Oncol; 2009 May 20;27(15_suppl):10053

  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • Patients were eligible when the primary tumour was irresectable and organ or life threatening.
  • Three tumors were NMYC amplified and two had loss of heterozygosity of 1p.
  • These patients responded insufficiently or showed return of tumor growth.
  • Three other patients had incomplete resection of their tumor.
  • At the end of treatment 16/21 patients achieved complete response (CR) and 3/21 had stable disease (2 very good partial response (VGPR), 1 partial response (PR)).
  • Two patients died, one of progressive disease, one due to complications of surgery (CR).

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  • (PMID = 27962449.001).
  • [ISSN] 1527-7755
  • [Journal-full-title] Journal of clinical oncology : official journal of the American Society of Clinical Oncology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] J. Clin. Oncol.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] United States
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25. Swinnen LJ, Rankin C, Rushing EJ, Laura HF, Damek DM, Barger GR: Phase II study of hydroxyurea for unresectable meningioma (Southwest Oncology Group S9811). J Clin Oncol; 2009 May 20;27(15_suppl):2063

  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] Phase II study of hydroxyurea for unresectable meningioma (Southwest Oncology Group S9811).
  • : 2063 Background: Meningiomas account for 15%-18% of CNS tumors.
  • Although benign, recurrence is seen in 16%-39% of cases, depending on the extent of resection possible.
  • Tumor location may make further resection hazardous.
  • Induction of apoptosis was furthermore demonstrated with HU in primary benign meningioma explant cultures.
  • The S9811 phase II trial was undertaken to estimate the objective response rate, if any, of unresectable benign meningioma to this HU regimen.
  • METHODS: Eligibility required unresectable, measurable, residual or recurrent, histologically-proven benign meningioma.
  • Progressive tumor or progressive neurologic deficit was required.
  • HU 20 mg/kg/day po was given for up to 2 years if there was no progressive disease.
  • Response assessment showed CR+PR 0% (95% CI 0-12%); SD 71% (95% CI 51-87%); PD 21% (95% CI 8-41%); undetermined 7%.
  • Grade 3 non-hematologic toxicity was seen in 7/28 (25%).
  • CONCLUSIONS: Chronic HU therapy for unresectable benign meningioma resulted in an estimated objective response rate of < 12%.
  • Whether the stable disease rate seen differs in any way from what can be expected from the natural history of meningioma cannot be determined from this phase II study design.

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  • (PMID = 27964694.001).
  • [ISSN] 1527-7755
  • [Journal-full-title] Journal of clinical oncology : official journal of the American Society of Clinical Oncology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] J. Clin. Oncol.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] United States
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26. Agarwala AK, Hanna N, McCollum A, Bechar N, DiMaio M, Yu M, Tong Y, Becerra CR, Choy H: Preoperative cetuximab and radiation (XRT) for patients (pts) with surgically resectable esophageal and gastroesophageal junction (GEJ) carcinomas: A pilot study from the Hoosier Oncology Group and the University of Texas Southwestern. J Clin Oncol; 2009 May 20;27(15_suppl):4557

  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] Preoperative cetuximab and radiation (XRT) for patients (pts) with surgically resectable esophageal and gastroesophageal junction (GEJ) carcinomas: A pilot study from the Hoosier Oncology Group and the University of Texas Southwestern.
  • 10 pts did not undergo surgery for various reasons including disease progression (n=7), AE unrelated to treatment (n=2), and personal decision to forgo esophagectomy (n=1).
  • CONCLUSIONS: Cetuximab and XRT results in pCR's in pts with esophageal and GEJ CA (rate of pCR 13/36), including patients with either SC or adenoCA histologies.
  • G3/4 toxicities, including dysphagia were generally uncommon.

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  • (PMID = 27963028.001).
  • [ISSN] 1527-7755
  • [Journal-full-title] Journal of clinical oncology : official journal of the American Society of Clinical Oncology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] J. Clin. Oncol.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] United States
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27. Macrorie-Fairweather RA, Albuquerque K, Yao K, Sinacore J: A decision tree to predict four or more positive axillary lymph nodes in breast cancer patients with positive sentinel node biopsy: Determining necessity for regional nodal irradiation in the absence of axillary dissection. J Clin Oncol; 2009 May 20;27(15_suppl):e11540

  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • The need for RNI is unclear for women with T1-2 tumors and 1-3 positive sentinel lymph nodes (SLN) who don't undergo axillary lymph node dissection (ALND).
  • METHODS: We reviewed the records of 197 women with T1-2 tumors and 1-3 positive SLN.
  • Ten clinicopathologic predictive variables were identified for analysis: patient age, size of tumor, histological type, tumor grade, number of metastatic SLN, largest SLN metastasis size, detection method, estrogen receptor, Ki67 and lymphovascular invasion (LVI).
  • The analysis used Chi-Square Automatic Interaction Detection (CHAID SPSS), a non-parametric, stepwise "regression tree" analysis, with Bonferroni adjusted p-values to create a decision tree.
  • The highest prevalence of ≥ 4 positive ALN were patients with LVI and a SLN metastasis size > 0.2cm.
  • The decision tree provides a new tool for the clinician to determine the necessity for RNI without ALND.

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  • (PMID = 27964656.001).
  • [ISSN] 1527-7755
  • [Journal-full-title] Journal of clinical oncology : official journal of the American Society of Clinical Oncology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] J. Clin. Oncol.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] United States
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28. Tie J, Sieber OM, Gibbs P, Lipton L, Jorissen RN, Langland R, Kosmider S, McKay D, Nolop KB, Desai J: Selecting subjects for a therapeutic target in colorectal cancer (CRC): Using a clinical database to enrich for patients harboring the BRAF&lt;sup&gt;V600E&lt;/sup&gt; mutation. J Clin Oncol; 2009 May 20;27(15_suppl):11003

  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • The mutation rate in rectal tumors, the concordance between primary and metastases, and the prognostic/predictive significance of BRAF are current gaps in knowledge.
  • METHODS: 481 primary tumors and 80 matched primary-metastasis (prim-met) pairs were analysed from a pre-defined cohort of pts with CRC based on age (≥ 70 vs < 70 years), gender, tumor site (right-R, left-L and rectum), stage (A to C vs D) and ≥ 2 years follow-up.
  • Analysis of the primary tumor reliably predicts the status of metastatic disease in the same patient.

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  • (PMID = 27964052.001).
  • [ISSN] 1527-7755
  • [Journal-full-title] Journal of clinical oncology : official journal of the American Society of Clinical Oncology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] J. Clin. Oncol.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] United States
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29. Chu DT, Hapani S, Wu S: Risk of bevacizumab-associated gastrointestinal perforation in patients with colorectal cancer and noncolorectal cancer. J Clin Oncol; 2009 May 20;27(15_suppl):9622

  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • : 9622 Background: Bevacizumab is a recombinant humanized monoclonal antibody that inhibits vascular endothelial growth factor.
  • It is a widely used angiogenesis inhibitor in the treatment of colorectal cancer (CRC) and other solid tumors.
  • This study was conducted to determine the risk of developing GI perforation among CRC and non-CRC patients receiving bevacizumab.
  • METHODS: Databases from PUBMED and the Web Science from January 1966 until July 2008 and abstracts presented at the American Society of Clinical Oncology conferences from January 2000 to through July 2008 were searched to identify relevant studies.
  • Eligible studies included prospective phase III clinical trials in which standard anti-neoplastic therapy was administered with and without the use of bevacizumab with available data for GI perforation.
  • RESULTS: A total of 12084 patients with various solid tumors from 14 phase III trials were included for analysis.
  • Among 2151 patients with CRC, the incidence of GI perforation was 0.8% (95% CI: 0.5-1.6%); while for 2.999 patients with non-CRC malignancies, the incidence of GI perforation was 0.7% (95% CI: 0.5-1.1%); The relative risk of GI perforation varied with tumor type, with significantly increased risk observed in patients with CRC (RR = 3.1, 95% CI: 1.2-8.2, p<0.023), but not non-CRC (RR=1.5, 95% CI: 0.67-3.4, p=0.3).
  • CONCLUSIONS: There is a significant difference in the risk of developing GI perforation in CRC and non-CRC patients receiving bevacizumab with a higher relative risk in patients with CRC.

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  • (PMID = 27963896.001).
  • [ISSN] 1527-7755
  • [Journal-full-title] Journal of clinical oncology : official journal of the American Society of Clinical Oncology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] J. Clin. Oncol.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] United States
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30. Batus M, Myint R, Coon J, Basu S, Kaiser K, Fidler M, Bonomi P: N-cadherin, E-cadherin, ERCC1, and c-kit expression in small cell lung cancer (SCLC) and potential for new therapeutic targets. J Clin Oncol; 2009 May 20;27(15_suppl):e22157

  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] N-cadherin, E-cadherin, ERCC1, and c-kit expression in small cell lung cancer (SCLC) and potential for new therapeutic targets.
  • Molecular markers may allow us to better stratify patients (pts) for new treatment options and drug combinations.
  • The objective of our study was to determine the frequency and potential prognostic significance of N-cadherin (N-cad), E-cadherin (E-cad), ERCC1, and c-kit (CD117) expression in SCLC.
  • METHODS: Tissue from 132 pts with SCLC was retrospectively stained for N-cad, E-cad, ERCC1, and c-kit.
  • Frequency of expression (% of tumor cells staining positive) was measured on a scale of 0-4 (freq 0=no expression (<1%), freq 1=1-10%, freq 2=11-35%, freq 3=36-70%, freq 4=71-100%).
  • Of the 132 pts, 75% had tumors that expressed (frequency ≥ 1) N-cad, 58% E-cad, 70% ERCC1, and 55% c-kit.
  • Comparing tumor marker expression with survival using either the Log-Rank Test or the Wilcoxon Test, there was no significant association for N-cad, E-cad, or ERCC1.
  • However, tumors that expressed c-kit with frequency ≥ 3 had a trend toward superior survival compared with frequency < 3.

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  • (PMID = 27963548.001).
  • [ISSN] 1527-7755
  • [Journal-full-title] Journal of clinical oncology : official journal of the American Society of Clinical Oncology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] J. Clin. Oncol.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] United States
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31. Rappa G, Anzanello F, Lorico A: CD24 expression and breast cancer stem cell phenotype. J Clin Oncol; 2009 May 20;27(15_suppl):11106

  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • : 11106 Background: Several studies suggest the existence of breast cancer-initiating cells (BCIC), responsible for tumor development and progression.
  • We have previously reported that upon in vitro culture as mammospheres under stem cell-like conditions, MA-11 cells acquired increased tumorigenicity and a CD44<sup>+</sup>CD24<sup>-/low</sup> phenotype.
  • Exposure of adherent MA-11 cells to imatinib for 72h resulted in a reversible decrease in CD24 from 214,000 to 15,800/cell.
  • After 24-48 h in culture, cell cycle distribution, growth rate and invasiveness of the sorted cell populations were equivalent.
  • Upon injection and s.c. growth, CD24 expression of CD44<sup>+</sup>CD24<sup>-/low</sup> populations and clones increased from 10,000 to 220,000/cell.
  • Similarly, CD44<sup>+</sup>CD24<sup>-/low</sup> clones derived from human MCF-7 breast carcinoma cells formed tumors containing >99% CD44<sup>+</sup>CD24<sup>high</sup> cells.
  • The average number of CD24 per cell was equivalent for tumors formed upon injection of CD44<sup>+</sup>CD24<sup>-/low</sup>, CD44<sup>+</sup>CD24<sup>+</sup>, mammosphere-derived cells or parental adherent MA-11 cells.
  • CONCLUSIONS: CD44<sup>+</sup>CD24<sup>-/low</sup> breast cancer cells are not associated with increased tumorigenicity; the high CD24 level of mouse xenografts derived from both CD44<sup>+</sup>CD24<sup>-/low</sup> and CD44<sup>+</sup>CD24<sup>hi</sup> breast cancer cells suggests an important role for CD24 in tumor growth.

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  • (PMID = 27963458.001).
  • [ISSN] 1527-7755
  • [Journal-full-title] Journal of clinical oncology : official journal of the American Society of Clinical Oncology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] J. Clin. Oncol.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] United States
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32. Barcelo-Galindez R, Uribe-Etxebarria N, Viteri A, Genollá J, Jimenez-Maestre U, Lorenzo-Martín M, Rios G, Rojo-Marcos R, Rumbero-Sanchez J, Pac-Ferrer J: Feasibility and safety of detection of sentinel node in lung cancer. J Clin Oncol; 2009 May 20;27(15_suppl):7587

  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • : 7587 Background: Sentinel node (SN) can be detected in the drainage of many primary cancers and is considered a standard procedure in some tumors.
  • METHODS: Patients with non-small cell lung cancer, clinical stage I, amenable to surgery were eligible.
  • Technique, as described by Liptay et al, consisted of four injections of albumin labelled with Technetium<sup>99</sup>, 0,25 mCi each peritumorally, and five minutes later, lobectomy and lymphadenectomy were associated with detection of SN (both in vivo and ex vivo).
  • SN was found in the lymphatic stations 10 or 11, except for tumors located in the left upper lobe, where two cases of a SN were found in station 5 and 6 each.
  • In 23 cases of 37, both SN and lymphadenectomy were free of tumor.
  • In seven of 37, SN was positive (in one, micrometastasis was detected with haematoxilin-eosin), and the rest of the nodes were free of tumor.
  • Modifications of the technique, using metabolic isotopes or new portatil 3D gamma detectors can be incorporated.

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  • (PMID = 27963411.001).
  • [ISSN] 1527-7755
  • [Journal-full-title] Journal of clinical oncology : official journal of the American Society of Clinical Oncology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] J. Clin. Oncol.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] United States
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33. Mathieu M, De la Cruz J, Veilllard AS, Koscielny S, Bourgier C, Rimareix F, Spielmann M, Delozier T, Andre F, Delaloge S: Use of progesterone receptor (PR) expression to predict benefit from prolonged adjuvant tamoxifen (TAM) in breast cancer: Results of a biomarker study from the TAM01 randomized Trial. J Clin Oncol; 2009 May 20;27(15_suppl):536

  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] Use of progesterone receptor (PR) expression to predict benefit from prolonged adjuvant tamoxifen (TAM) in breast cancer: Results of a biomarker study from the TAM01 randomized Trial.
  • The tumor blocks of 587/988 pts included at the Institut Gustave-Roussy, were used to construct a tissue micro-array (TMA).
  • Immunohistochemical stainings were performed for ER, PR, bcl2, p53 (+: > 10% of stained cells), HER-2 (+: score 3+), EGFR1 (+: any positivity), PAK1, IGFR1 (+: intensity = 2 or 3).
  • Tumor characteristics : 54% node-positive, 85% ER+, 64% PR+, 7% HER-2+, 68% bcl2+, 14% p53+, 8% EGFR1+, 46% PAK1, 45% IGFR1.
  • However, PR expression was strongly predictive for the efficacy of extended TAM on TTR (interaction test, p = 0.003).
  • Long-term TAM was associated with a hazard ratio of 0.56, (95% CI: 0.30-1.03) and 1.94 (95%CI = 0.80-4.70) for PR+ and PR- pts respectively.
  • A trend towards interaction between ER (p = 0.04), HER-2 (p = 0.05) and Bcl2 (p = 0.03) expression and a benefit from TAM was also observed, with a trend towards greater efficacy of prolonged TAM in ER+/HER-2-/ bcl2+ tumors.
  • CONCLUSIONS: PR expression, probably reflective of ER activation and functionality, strongly predicts benefit from continuation of TAM after 2-3 yrs.
  • These data could provide a rationale for evaluating the efficacy of TAM after 5 years of anti-aromatase therapy in post-menopausal women with ER+/PR+/bcl2+/Her2-tumors.

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  • (PMID = 27960686.001).
  • [ISSN] 1527-7755
  • [Journal-full-title] Journal of clinical oncology : official journal of the American Society of Clinical Oncology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] J. Clin. Oncol.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] United States
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34. Gadaleta C, Catino A, Rubini G, Ranieri G, Fazio V, Gadaleta-Caldarola G, Vinciarelli G, Armenise F, Gaudiano A, Mattioli V: Precision pulmonary trans-arterial chemoembolization (PPTACE) plus percutaneous RFA for unresectable lung neoplasms: Initial experience in twelve cases. J Clin Oncol; 2009 May 20;27(15_suppl):7593

  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] Precision pulmonary trans-arterial chemoembolization (PPTACE) plus percutaneous RFA for unresectable lung neoplasms: Initial experience in twelve cases.
  • : 7593 Background: The study aimed to evaluate the feasibility and safety of precision pulmonary arterial chemoembolization (PPTACE) followed by percutaneous RFA in patients with unresectable lung neoplasms Methods: From November 2007 to October 2008, twelve patients (5 male, 7 female, median age 57) and 20 nodules were treated in 14 sessions.
  • Patients had lung metastases from the following tumors: uterine cancer (2), colorectal carcinoma (7), breast carcinoma (1) and two patients had primary unresectable NSCLC.
  • Median diameter of neoplasms was 2 cm.
  • Two patients underwent two sessions of treatment due to bilateral disease.
  • After subclavian vein puncture and mapping of arterial vascularization of the segment including the tumoral nodule, antiblastic agents loaded on microspheres (Hepasphere, 50-100 micron in diameter) were selectively perfused in a subsegmental sector.
  • Morphological response showed a necrotic area, without contrast-enhancement at CT scan, including the neoplasm plus a large safety zone.

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  • (PMID = 27963406.001).
  • [ISSN] 1527-7755
  • [Journal-full-title] Journal of clinical oncology : official journal of the American Society of Clinical Oncology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] J. Clin. Oncol.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] United States
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35. Albers P, Bingöl C, Witthuhn R, de Geeter P: Complications of postchemotherapy residual tumor resection in patients with germ cell cancer. J Clin Oncol; 2009 May 20;27(15_suppl):e16077

  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] Complications of postchemotherapy residual tumor resection in patients with germ cell cancer.
  • : e16077 Background: Residual tumor resection (RTR) is mandatory in all patients with advanced germ cell tumors and visible residual disease after chemotherapy.
  • Stage-related RTR may decrease surgical complications, enhance the rate of postoperative antegrade ejaculations and may not compromise oncological efficacy.
  • In 34%, residual tumor diameter was >5 cm.
  • In 25 of 98 patients a full bilateral RTR was necessary to remove all residual tumors.
  • The median residual tumor diameter in patients with full bilateral RTR without nerve-sparing was 10.9 cm (1.5-30) as opposed to 4.3 cm (0.5-20) in patients with modified template and/or nerve-sparing approaches (not significant).
  • All CTCAE grade III/VI complications like intraoperative hemorrhage (n=25, 11/25 bilateral RTR), postoperative lymphocele (n=8, 6/8 bilateral RTR), and retrograde ejaculation (15% with modified template and/or nerve-sparing, 100% with bilateral RTR) were significantly correlated with the residual tumor size and with the field of resection.
  • CONCLUSIONS: The complication rate of RTR is strongly related to the median residual tumor size and the extent of surgery.
  • The field of resection should be adapted to the primary localization of disease and full bilateral resections should be performed only in patients with bilateral disease.

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  • (PMID = 27963039.001).
  • [ISSN] 1527-7755
  • [Journal-full-title] Journal of clinical oncology : official journal of the American Society of Clinical Oncology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] J. Clin. Oncol.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] United States
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36. Miller CP, Loeb K, Edlefsen K, Urban N, Blau CA: Localization of erythropoietin receptor mRNA in primary breast tumors by laser capture microdissection. J Clin Oncol; 2009 May 20;27(15_suppl):e22036

  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] Localization of erythropoietin receptor mRNA in primary breast tumors by laser capture microdissection.
  • : e22036 Background: Adverse effects of erythropoiesis stimulating agents on tumor progression and/or survival were observed in recent Phase III clinical trials, however, mechanisms are not understood.
  • Whether tumor erythropoietin receptor (EpoR) expression is associated with erythropoietin-dependent tumor progression remains unclear, owing in part to the lack of specificity of commercial antibodies for protein detection.
  • To overcome issues of protein detection, we previously optimized a quantitative RTPCR approach for reliable measurements of low level EpoR mRNA in primary tumor samples, and observed a 30-fold range of EpoR expression among panels of both breast and head and neck cancer samples.
  • METHODS: To test whether EpoR mRNA is expressed in tumor epithelial cells, we performed laser capture microdissection to fractionate 3 breast tumors into tumor epithelial enriched vs. depleted fractions.
  • RESULTS: Vascular endothelial markers in tumor epithelial-enriched fractions were reduced by an average of 15.3-fold (vascular endothelial cadherin) and 18.5-fold (platelet cell adhesion molecule 1) while the stromal marker vimentin was reduced by 14.7-fold.
  • CONCLUSIONS: Despite the depletion of endothelial cells, EpoR mRNA was at the same level or enriched in tumor epithelial fractions.
  • These results demonstrate that malignant epithelial cells are a major source of EpoR mRNA in primary tumors.
  • Applying this approach to additional breast cancer specimens as well as other cancer types will improve our understanding of erythropoietin-associated tumor progression.

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  • (PMID = 27963153.001).
  • [ISSN] 1527-7755
  • [Journal-full-title] Journal of clinical oncology : official journal of the American Society of Clinical Oncology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] J. Clin. Oncol.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] United States
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37. Wu P, Rosario C, Paderova J, Gladdy R, Ko M, Squire J, Dennis J, Swallow C: Mechanisms of Plk4 haploinsufficiency in hepatocellular carcinogenesis. J Clin Oncol; 2009 May 20;27(15_suppl):11100

  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • We hypothesize that Plk4 is a haploinsufficient tumor suppressor in man.
  • 5 out of 9 late passage Plk4<sup>±</sup> MEF lines injected into NOD-SCID mice grew tumors, with a latency of 3 to 12 weeks.
  • By contrast, injection of Plk4<sup>+/+</sup> MEFs yielded no tumors.
  • Tumors generated from injection of Plk4<sup>±</sup> MEFs were harvested, cultured and submitted to SKY analysis; this showed increased clonal rearrangements and deletions compared to the parent cell lines.

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  • (PMID = 27963463.001).
  • [ISSN] 1527-7755
  • [Journal-full-title] Journal of clinical oncology : official journal of the American Society of Clinical Oncology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] J. Clin. Oncol.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] United States
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38. Priolo C, Loda M: Unraveling the metabolome in prostate tumorigenesis: Effects by an oncogenic isopeptidase. J Clin Oncol; 2009 May 20;27(15_suppl):e16148

  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • : e16148 Background: Cancer cells undergo fundamental changes in their metabolism, including a higher rate of glycolysis and an increase in de novo fatty acid synthesis.
  • The high incorporation of glucose into tumor cells has already been exploited in cancer diagnostics with the generation of the FDG-PET scan technology.
  • However, some tumors including those arising in the prostate are less prone to FDG-PET imaging and could benefit from other imaging techniques based on alternative metabolic features.
  • We asked whether prostate epithelial cell transformation driven by specific oncogenes results in a typical metabolic profiling, whose characterization may be useful to improve diagnostics and to address new therapeutics.
  • Complementary assays including oxygen consumption and glucose uptake measurement confirmed the global metabolic analysis.
  • CONCLUSIONS: These results suggest that tumors showing different genetic alterations may be characterized by a different metabolic profiling, whose assessment can potentially improve diagnostics and individualized treatment.
  • Metabolic profiling analysis of human prostate tumors is currently ongoing.

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  • (PMID = 27963423.001).
  • [ISSN] 1527-7755
  • [Journal-full-title] Journal of clinical oncology : official journal of the American Society of Clinical Oncology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] J. Clin. Oncol.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] United States
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39. Sahoo R, Babu V, Patil G, Kulkarni J, Rao S, Thakur S, Dondhalay G, Banerjee A, Kumar Bs A, Korlimarla A, Rao M R: Evaluation of p53 and BCL2 expression, mutation, and aneuploidy status on treatment response in an Indian cohort of primary Ca larynx. J Clin Oncol; 2009 May 20;27(15_suppl):e17057

  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • However, failure of some tumors to respond to treatment or tumor recurrence limits the overall success of these therapies.
  • P53 mutations have been linked to cisplatin resistance in other solid tumors.
  • DNA ploidy and S-phase fractions were also analysed.
  • Independent samples t tests were used to determine changes in P53 over expression, BCL2 expression Ploidy status and S phase fractions in both responders and non responders.
  • RESULTS: There was a trend for increase in P53 over expression and BCL2 expression and decrease in S phase fractions in responders vs non responders.
  • However, BCL2 expression correlated negatively with disease stage (r = - 0.57, p = 0.02).
  • Aneuploidy was observed in node positive tumors (p = 0.04).

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  • (PMID = 27961818.001).
  • [ISSN] 1527-7755
  • [Journal-full-title] Journal of clinical oncology : official journal of the American Society of Clinical Oncology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] J. Clin. Oncol.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] United States
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40. Ehrlich Y, Brames MJ, Beck SD, Foster RS, Einhorn LH: Long-term follow-up of chemotherapy-induced remissions in patients with disseminated nonseminomatous germ cell tumors. J Clin Oncol; 2009 May 20;27(15_suppl):5029

  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] Long-term follow-up of chemotherapy-induced remissions in patients with disseminated nonseminomatous germ cell tumors.
  • : 5029 Background: There is controversy concerning management of patients (pts) with nonseminomatous germ cell tumor (NSGCT) who obtain a chemotherapy-induced complete radiographic (<1cm node diameter) and serologic remission (CR).
  • Proponents of mandatory RPLND cite a 20% to 30% rate of residual microscopic tumor, mostly teratoma, despite achieving CR.
  • RESULTS: At a median a FU of 15 years (range 3 months to 23.8 years), 12 pts recurred and 4 are dead of disease (DOD).
  • The estimated 15 year recurrence free and disease specific survival was 90% and 97% respectively.
  • All 5 are currently disease free.

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  • (PMID = 27962913.001).
  • [ISSN] 1527-7755
  • [Journal-full-title] Journal of clinical oncology : official journal of the American Society of Clinical Oncology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] J. Clin. Oncol.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] United States
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41. Chiorean EG, Mahadevan D, Harris WB, Von Hoff DD, Younger AE, Rensvold DM, Shelton CF, Hennessy BT, Garlich JR, Ramanathan RK: Phase I evaluation of SF1126, a vascular targeted PI3K inhibitor, administered twice weekly IV in patients with refractory solid tumors. J Clin Oncol; 2009 May 20;27(15_suppl):2558

  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] Phase I evaluation of SF1126, a vascular targeted PI3K inhibitor, administered twice weekly IV in patients with refractory solid tumors.
  • It is designed to increased solubility and binding to integrins expressed on tumor vasculature.
  • This targeted prodrug enhances tumor delivery of the active inhibitor, improving antitumor efficacy and tolerability in xenograft models.
  • LY294002 inhibits other kinases including mTOR, DNA-PK, PIM1, PLK1, and CK2, and induces oxidative stress in cancer cells independent of its PI3K inhibition.
  • METHODS: Pts with advanced solid tumors are enrolled in sequential cohorts in standard 3+3 design.
  • Pharmacodynamic (PD) evaluations of PI3K pathways are being measured in PBMC, skin/hair and tumor samples as well as by 18FDG PET scans.
  • Eleven pts showed stable disease for ≥ 8 wks, including durations of 20 wks for one GIST, 1 endometrial, and 1 prostate; 15 wks for 1 pancreatic; 11 wks for 2 GIST, 2 ovarian, and 1 CRC pt.
  • PD: Compared to baseline biopsy, we observed significant inhibition of pS6 by IHC in a tumor biopsy 20 hours after the 8<sup>th</sup> dose in a pancreatic cancer pt at 240 mg/m<sup>2</sup>.
  • Clinical activity includes disease stabilization in multiple pts with refractory tumors.

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  • (PMID = 27961868.001).
  • [ISSN] 1527-7755
  • [Journal-full-title] Journal of clinical oncology : official journal of the American Society of Clinical Oncology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] J. Clin. Oncol.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] United States
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42. Ursu R, Carpentier A, Metellus P, Barrie M, Meng Y, Laigle-Donadey F, Tibi A, Chinot O, Carpentier AF: Phase II trial of intracerebral administration of CpG oligonucleotide for patients with recurrent glioblastoma. J Clin Oncol; 2009 May 20;27(15_suppl):2043

  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • When injected locally, they can induce tumor rejection in animal models.
  • The percentage of patients without tumour progression at 6 months after inclusion was the primary endpoint.
  • CpG-28 reached up to 79 ng/mL at the end of infusion in one patient.

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  • (PMID = 27964650.001).
  • [ISSN] 1527-7755
  • [Journal-full-title] Journal of clinical oncology : official journal of the American Society of Clinical Oncology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] J. Clin. Oncol.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] United States
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43. Hussain R, Jamshed A, Rehman K, Iqbal H, Azhar R, Faruqui Z, Ahmed Q: Function preservation with multimodality treatment in locally advanced oral tongue cancer. J Clin Oncol; 2009 May 20;27(15_suppl):e17051

  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • Pretreatment AJCC stage as assessed on MRI was T2N+ (tumour crossing midline) 13%, T3N0 20%, T3N+ 47%, and T4N+ 20%.
  • Four to six weeks following second cycle of chemotherapy local excision of residual primary tumor with ipsilateral modified neck dissection was performed.
  • Patients with ypN+ disease received concomitant 3 weekly cisplatin 75 mg/m<sup>2</sup> with radiation.
  • RESULTS: Overall and disease free survival at 20 months was 60%.
  • Twelve patients (80%) are alive and 3 patients (20%) have died of disease at 9, 14 and 14 months (locoregional failure 1 and distant metastasis 2 patients).
  • In patients alive without disease assessment of deglutition and speech at the time of last follow up showed all patients on full oral diet with spontaneous intelligible speech.

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  • (PMID = 27961816.001).
  • [ISSN] 1527-7755
  • [Journal-full-title] Journal of clinical oncology : official journal of the American Society of Clinical Oncology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] J. Clin. Oncol.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] United States
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44. Uronis HE, Bullock K, Blobe G, Hsu S, Morse M, Nixon A, Haley S, O'Neill M, Hurwitz H, Bendell J: A phase I study of gemcitabine plus dasatinib (GD) or gemcitabine plus dasatinib plus cetuximab (GDC) in refractory solid tumors. J Clin Oncol; 2009 May 20;27(15_suppl):e15506

  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] A phase I study of gemcitabine plus dasatinib (GD) or gemcitabine plus dasatinib plus cetuximab (GDC) in refractory solid tumors.
  • METHODS: Patients (pts) with advanced solid tumors were enrolled in cohorts of 3-6 to either GD or GDC.
  • G was dosed in mg/m<sup>2</sup> weekly for 3 of 4 weeks, D was dosed in mg PO BID, and C was dosed at 250 mg/m<sup>2</sup> weekly after loading dose of C=400; cycle length was 28 days.
  • Eligible pts had advanced solid tumors, adequate organ and marrow function, and no co-morbidities that would increase risk of toxicity.
  • RESULTS: 25 pts have been enrolled, including 21 with pancreatic adenocarcinoma, 3 of whom had received prior G. 21 pts were evaluable for toxicity and 18 for efficacy.
  • Possible treatment-related adverse events in later cycles included: Gr3-4 ANC (n=4), Gr4 colitis (n=1), Gr3 bilirubin (n=2), Gr3 Hgb (n=2), Gr3 Plt (n=2), Gr3 edema/fluid retention syndrome (n=1), and Gr3 vomiting (n=2).
  • Eight of 18 pts, 3 of whom had received prior G, had stable disease as best response, median duration = 5 months (range 1-7).
  • Stable disease in previous G-refractory pts was noted.
  • Hematologic toxicities were dose-limiting; later toxicities including hematologic, LFT changes, pneumonitis, and fluid retention were seen.

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  • (PMID = 27962236.001).
  • [ISSN] 1527-7755
  • [Journal-full-title] Journal of clinical oncology : official journal of the American Society of Clinical Oncology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] J. Clin. Oncol.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] United States
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45. Cabrera A, Jantus Lewintre E, Sirera R, Honguero A, Gil M, Blasco A, Sanmartin E, Arnau A, Guijarro R, Camps C: Expression of angiogenic genes in resectable non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). J Clin Oncol; 2009 May 20;27(15_suppl):e22207

  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] Expression of angiogenic genes in resectable non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC).
  • It is known that angiogenesis is an essential event for solid tumour growth.
  • Vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) family of ligand and receptors (VEGFR) are described as powerful angiogenic factors.
  • VEGF belongs to a protein family, within which Placental growth factor (PlGF) is a member, they bound to their receptors at the membrane levels, gathering a cascade of intracellular events.
  • RESULTS: Our results show that tumor samples have higher expression of PlGF than normal tissue.
  • We found a significant correlation between the levels of expression of PlGF and the tumor size (p= 0.023, Spearman's test), whereas no relation was found between the expression of the genes and the histology or stage of disease.
  • CONCLUSIONS: Our results reveal that, in NSCLC, PlGF mRNA is higher in tumor than in normal tissue and is positively correlated with the tumor size and with the expression of angiogenic receptors.
  • Theses finding could indicate that PlGF have some role in lung cancer progression and may be a promising new biomarker in NSCLC, but still more investigations are necessary with a larger number of samples.

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  • (PMID = 27964135.001).
  • [ISSN] 1527-7755
  • [Journal-full-title] Journal of clinical oncology : official journal of the American Society of Clinical Oncology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] J. Clin. Oncol.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] United States
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46. Mechtler L, Wong ET, Hormigo A, Pannullo S, Hines V, Milsted R, O'Connor PC, Ryan RP, Recht L: A long-term open-label extension study examining the steroid-sparing effects of corticorelin acetate in patients with cerebral tumors. J Clin Oncol; 2009 May 20;27(15_suppl):2079

  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] A long-term open-label extension study examining the steroid-sparing effects of corticorelin acetate in patients with cerebral tumors.
  • The objective of this study was to evaluate long-term safety, tolerability and steroid-sparing potential of CrA in patients with primary or secondary brain tumors and peritumoral edema.
  • CONCLUSIONS: These findings indicate that CrA is safe and well-tolerated, and may enable substantial reduction or cessation of dex therapy for many patients with cerebral tumors.

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  • (PMID = 27964371.001).
  • [ISSN] 1527-7755
  • [Journal-full-title] Journal of clinical oncology : official journal of the American Society of Clinical Oncology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] J. Clin. Oncol.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] United States
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47. Widemann BC, Fox E, Adamson PC, Baruchel S, Kim A, Ingle AM, Bender JG, Stempak D, Balis FM, Blaney SM: Phase I study of sorafenib in children with refractory solid tumors: A Children's Oncology Group Phase I Consortium trial. J Clin Oncol; 2009 May 20;27(15_suppl):10012

  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] Phase I study of sorafenib in children with refractory solid tumors: A Children's Oncology Group Phase I Consortium trial.
  • We performed a phase I trial to determine the toxicities, maximum tolerated dose (MTD), pharmacokinetics (PK), and pharmacodynamics (PD) of sorafenib in children with refractory solid tumors.
  • RESULTS: 34 eligible pts [16M, median age 14.6 yrs, (range, 5-21)] with osteosarcoma (n = 8), rhabdomyosarcoma (n = 3), other sarcomas (n = 13), hepatoblastoma (n = 3), or other solid tumors (n = 7) received 1-22 cycles (median 2).
  • Gr 3 DLTs occurred in 1/6 pts (lipase) at 150 mg/m<sup>2</sup> and 2/2 pts (hyponatremia, hand-foot syndrome) at 250 mg/m<sup>2</sup>.
  • No objective responses were observed, but 2 pts had tumor shrinkage.
  • Plasma VEGFR (n = 13) decreased from 9.9±1.6 ng/mL at baseline to 8.3±1.7 ng/mL by d 28 (p < 0.001).
  • CONCLUSIONS: The MTD of sorafenib in children with solid tumors is 200 mg/m<sup>2</sup>, similar to the adult recommended dose (400 mg).

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  • (PMID = 27962524.001).
  • [ISSN] 1527-7755
  • [Journal-full-title] Journal of clinical oncology : official journal of the American Society of Clinical Oncology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] J. Clin. Oncol.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] United States
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48. Thieltges S, Kalinina T, Krohn A, Simon R, Moeller-Krull M, Dierlamm J, Izbicki J, Yekebas E: Identification of chromosomal regions that harbor novel genes important for pancreatic cancer pathogenesis by genome-wide screening methods. J Clin Oncol; 2009 May 20;27(15_suppl):e15609

  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • : e15609 Background: Pancreatic adenocarcinoma is a genetically highly complex and heterogenous tumor type with strong genetic instability which makes it resistant to therapy.
  • Known amplifications of oncogenes such as KRAS or MYC and deletions of tumor suppresor genes such as CDKN2A and SMAD4 have demonstrated the importance of genetic alteration in this tumor type.
  • METHODS: We report the use of an Affymetrix Genome-Wide Human single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) Array 6.0 (906,600 SNPs) to screen for gene copy number changes and allelic imbalances in 8 microdissected primary pancreatic tumors and 7 established pancreatic cancer cell lines.
  • Mutation analysis of KRAS and M-FISH analysis of cell lines was performed.
  • RESULTS: SNP arrays confirmed the presence of previously reported cytogenetic abnormalities in the cell lines and primary tumor probes, including MYC amplifikation at 8q24, gain of 17q12 (ERBB2/HER2), 7p12 (EGFR) and 12p12.1 (KRAS).
  • There was also strong concordance between primary tumors and cell lines with respect to gains on 8q, 12p and 18q.
  • M-FISH analysis showed complex karyotypes with chromosomal deletions in 9p and 18q, regions that are known to harbor tumor suppressor genes (CDKN2A, SMAD4 and TP53).
  • CONCLUSIONS: Several signaling pathways mediate tumor cell survival.
  • Analysis of gene amplification and RNA expression profile provide molecular biological characteristics and an individual gene signature of the tumor which allow us to choose more efficient drugs to an individualized treatment.
  • Pathways activated by KRAS such as DYRK1B may offer new therapeutic targets.

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  • (PMID = 27962682.001).
  • [ISSN] 1527-7755
  • [Journal-full-title] Journal of clinical oncology : official journal of the American Society of Clinical Oncology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] J. Clin. Oncol.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] United States
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49. von Mehren M, Chu Q, Alcindor T, Townsley C, Thallury S, MacAlpine K, Wright JJ, Oza A: Early results of a PMH Phase II Consortium trial of AZD0530 in advanced soft tissue sarcoma (STS). J Clin Oncol; 2009 May 20;27(15_suppl):10579

  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • Src kinases play a role in tumor cell migration, invasion and metastasis as well as being part of the signaling cascade for angiogenesis and growth factors.
  • METHODS: The study utilized a Simon Two stage design with the primary endpoint be objective tumor response + prolonged stable disease rate (defined as partial/complete response by RECIST, or stable disease >4 months).
  • Patients with measurable advanced STS with up to one prior chemotherapy for metastatic disease were eligible for study participation following informed consent.
  • RESULTS: 17 patients (11 F, 6M) with advanced STS (leiomyosarcoma 5, rhabdomyosarcoma 3, MFH/carcinosarcoma/Fibrosarcoma 2, endometrial stromal sarcoma/liposarcoma/non-rhabdoSTS 1 each) were enrolled, the majority of whom had prior therapy (14 chemo and 9 xrt).
  • Nine discontinued therapy for progressive disease, 2 for toxicity and 1 patient request.
  • To date, tumor responses have not been noted; however patients were not selected based on tumor target expression.
  • Further testing may be warranted in selected tumors in combination with chemotherapy given pre-clinical synergy data or in tumors pre-selected for target expression.

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  • (PMID = 27963760.001).
  • [ISSN] 1527-7755
  • [Journal-full-title] Journal of clinical oncology : official journal of the American Society of Clinical Oncology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] J. Clin. Oncol.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] United States
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50. Chohan K, Lai D, McNamara M, Grogan L, Breathnach OS: The frequency of febrile neutropenia in oncology patients receiving chemotherapy. J Clin Oncol; 2009 May 20;27(15_suppl):e20691

  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] The frequency of febrile neutropenia in oncology patients receiving chemotherapy.
  • : e20691 Background:Febrile neutropenia (F/N) is a relatively common and serious side effect for oncology patients undergoing chemotherapy.
  • Due to varying dosages and frequency of cytotoxic agents administered to oncology patients, the incidence and grade of neutropenia varies.

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  • (PMID = 27961758.001).
  • [ISSN] 1527-7755
  • [Journal-full-title] Journal of clinical oncology : official journal of the American Society of Clinical Oncology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] J. Clin. Oncol.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] United States
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51. Carroll PA, Healy L, Lysaght J, Griffin M, Dunne B, Boyle MT, Reynolds JV, Kennedy MJ, Pidgeon G, Connolly EM: Mammary adipose tissue and cancer cell growth: The role of adipose tissue in the tumor microenvironment. J Clin Oncol; 2009 May 20;27(15_suppl):e22009

  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] Mammary adipose tissue and cancer cell growth: The role of adipose tissue in the tumor microenvironment.
  • Adipose tissue is considered an important endocrine organ producing several important hormones and cytokines including leptin and adiponectin.
  • Mechanisms for the role of obesity in cancer states includes the excess or unregulated secretion of adipocytokines from adipose tissue, and potentially the metabolic syndrome (a cluster of co-morbidities linked to metabolic dysregulation).
  • Mammary adipose tissue is proposed to play a vital role in the microenvironment of normal and tumour states within the breast<sup>2</sup>.
  • METHODS: Peritumoural (PT) adipose tissue adjacent to the tumour and distal adipose tissue (D) within the breast was sampled in 10 patients.
  • RESULTS: ACM from both sites promoted tumour cell survival.
  • This may be mediated through increased pro-inflammatory or pro- mitogenic adipocytokine production in adipose tissue surrounding tumour.
  • Further analysis will determine what role obesity and the metabolic syndrome plays in the results noted.

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  • (PMID = 27963182.001).
  • [ISSN] 1527-7755
  • [Journal-full-title] Journal of clinical oncology : official journal of the American Society of Clinical Oncology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] J. Clin. Oncol.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] United States
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52. Curigliano G, Fumagalli L, Bagnardi V, Rotmensz N, Locatelli M, Ghisini R, Viale G, Veronesi P, Goldhirsch A: Clinical relevance of small tumor size (pT1a-b) for patients with HER2-positive, node-negative breast cancer. J Clin Oncol; 2009 May 20;27(15_suppl):e22011

  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] Clinical relevance of small tumor size (pT1a-b) for patients with HER2-positive, node-negative breast cancer.
  • : e22011 Background: Prognosis of patients with node-negative, HER2-positive disease and tumor size ≤ 1 cm is a matter of controversy.
  • METHODS: All consecutive patients with pT1a,b pN0 M0 HER2-positive breast cancer who underwent surgery at the European Institute of Oncology (IEO) from 1995 to 2006 were identified.
  • We estimated rates of local recurrence, distant metastases, disease free survival (DFS) and overall survival (OS) in the hormone receptor positive and hormone receptor negative group.
  • RESULTS: We identified 150 patients with pT1a,b pN0 M0 HER2-positive tumors.
  • In the hormone receptor positive group 5-year DFS was 99% [95% CI: 98%-100%] for HER2-negative and 92% [95% CI: 86%-99%] for HER2-positive disease.
  • In the hormone receptor negative group 5-year DFS was 92% [95% CI: 84%-100%] for HER2-negative and 91% [95% CI: 84%-99%] in HER2-positive disease.
  • Overall, for patients with hormone receptors positive and negative disease, the hazard ratio (HR) associated to HER2 overexpression was 2.4 (95% CI: 0.9-6.5, p=0.09).
  • In patients with hormone receptor positive, pT1a,b N0 M0 tumors, HER2 overexpression seems to be associated with a dire prognosis (HR=5.2, 95% CI: 1.0-25.9) in terms of DFS.

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  • (PMID = 27963185.001).
  • [ISSN] 1527-7755
  • [Journal-full-title] Journal of clinical oncology : official journal of the American Society of Clinical Oncology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] J. Clin. Oncol.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] United States
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53. Kurbacher CM, Schmidt M, Kurbacher JA, Schäfer S, Arenz PN, Nagel WJ, Reinhold U: Bevacizumab (BEV) and continuous low-dose granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF) in patients with advanced solid tumors: final results of a prospective clinical trial. J Clin Oncol; 2009 May 20;27(15_suppl):e14544

  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] Bevacizumab (BEV) and continuous low-dose granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF) in patients with advanced solid tumors: final results of a prospective clinical trial.
  • : e14544 Background: BEV is potent inhibitor of VEGF-mediated tumor angiogenesis.
  • In a previous study, GM-CSF was able to produce clinical responses in patients (pts) suffering from refractory carcinomas (Kurbacher et al., Oncology 2005).
  • In this trial, we investigated BEV+GM-CSF in pts with advanced solid neoplasms.
  • All pts have been considered refractory to or non-treatable by chemotherapy due to their baseline bone marrow and/or organ functions.
  • The objective response rate was 31% (1 CR, 7 PR, 10 SD, and 8 PD); the rate of pts benefiting was 69%.
  • CONCLUSIONS: BEV+GM-CSF is an active and generally well tolerated non-cytotoxic regimen in pts with advanced solid tumors.

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  • (PMID = 27963617.001).
  • [ISSN] 1527-7755
  • [Journal-full-title] Journal of clinical oncology : official journal of the American Society of Clinical Oncology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] J. Clin. Oncol.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] United States
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54. Hwang I, Chi K, Do J, Lee G, Kang J, Oh S, Kwon H, Park H, Lee S, Lee S, Jang J: Clinical implication of ERCC1 overexpression in advanced biliary tract adenocarcinoma patients treated with platinum-based palliative chemotherapy. J Clin Oncol; 2009 May 20;27(15_suppl):e22018

  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • : e22018 Background: Several clinical studies have shown that Excision repair cross-complementation group1 (ERCC1) overexpression is associated with resistance to platinum-based chemotherapy and poor prognoses in several tumors.
  • 26 (57.8%) of 45 patients showed clinical benefits(including complete response, partial response and stable disease).
  • On univariate analysis, PFS was 2.3 months for patients with ERCC1 positive tumor and 5.3 months for those with ERCC1 negative tumor (P = 0.053).
  • CONCLUSIONS: These results suggest that advanced biliary tract adenocarcinoma patients with ERCC1-negative tumors show a survival benefit from palliative chemotherapy with a platinum- containing regimen.

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  • (PMID = 27963197.001).
  • [ISSN] 1527-7755
  • [Journal-full-title] Journal of clinical oncology : official journal of the American Society of Clinical Oncology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] J. Clin. Oncol.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] United States
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55. Bertucci F, Le Doussal JM, Birnbaum D, Tagett R, Martinec A, Hermitte F, Marisa L, Martin AL, Geneve J, Roché H, Penault-Llorca F: Prognostic value of the genomic grade index (GGi) as compared to centrally measured Ki-67 IHC and mitotic index in early breast cancer patients. J Clin Oncol; 2009 May 20;27(15_suppl):11094

  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • : 11094 Background: Genomic grading has been proposed to improve tumor grading.
  • The genomic grade index (GGi) is a 97-gene continuous measure which resolves 80% of histological grade 2 (HG 2) tumors into HG 1 and HG 3 risk categories.
  • 128 genomic profiles could be obtained from available frozen tumor samples using Affymetrix U133 Plus 2.0 gene chips through the "Carte d'Identite des Tumeurs" program of the French Ligue Nationale contre le Cancer.

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  • (PMID = 27963120.001).
  • [ISSN] 1527-7755
  • [Journal-full-title] Journal of clinical oncology : official journal of the American Society of Clinical Oncology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] J. Clin. Oncol.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] United States
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56. Zain JM, Foss F, Kelly WK, DeBono J, Petrylak D, Narwal A, Neylon E, Blumenschein G, Lassen U, O'Connor OA: Final results of a phase I study of oral belinostat (PXD101) in patients with lymphoma. J Clin Oncol; 2009 May 20;27(15_suppl):8580

  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • A phase I of oral Bel in patients (pts) with solid tumors found a recommended dose for day (d) 1-14, q3w, of 750 mg QD, with option for intra-patient dose escalation if limited toxicity.
  • Pts with relapsed/refractory non-Hodgkin lymphoma (NHL) or Hodgkin's disease (HD) with evaluable disease and acceptable organ functions were eligible.
  • Dose limiting toxicity (DLT) assessed in cycle 1 included: related non-hem grade (gr) 3/4 tox; gr 4 neutropenia > 5 d or with fever > 100.5 °F; gr 4 thrombocytopenia > 7 d.
  • RESULTS: 9 pts (3 per cohort), median age 51 (range 21-92), median 5 (range 2-7) prior regimens (83% had BM transplants, including 1 pt with allogeneic) have been enrolled.
  • Non-hem gr 3 events (no gr 4 noted): diarrhea (1 pt each in cohorts A and B, both in cycle 2), fatigue, anorexia, and leg DVT (each in 1 pt; all after cycle 1).
  • In 6 pts evaluable for efficacy, stable disease have been noted in 5 pts for 3 to +7 cycles, including 3 of 3 pts (one refractory) with MCL and 2 of 2 pts (both refractory) with HD.
  • Tumor shrinkage of 43 to 49% have been found in 1 HD and 2 MCL pts after cycle 2.
  • CONCLUSIONS: Oral Bel can be delivered safely with a d 1-14, q3w schedule in pts with lymphoma at a daily dose higher than what has been established for pts with solid tumors.
  • The safety profile and early tumor shrinkage noted in MCL and HD warrants continued evaluation of Bel, especially in combination with other active compounds.

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  • (PMID = 27962263.001).
  • [ISSN] 1527-7755
  • [Journal-full-title] Journal of clinical oncology : official journal of the American Society of Clinical Oncology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] J. Clin. Oncol.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] United States
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57. Townsend AR, Millward M, Price T, Mainwaring P, Spencer A, Longenecker A, Palladino MA, Lloyd GK, Spear MA, Padrik P: Clinical trial of NPI-0052 in advanced malignancies including lymphoma and leukemia (advanced malignancies arm). J Clin Oncol; 2009 May 20;27(15_suppl):3582

  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] Clinical trial of NPI-0052 in advanced malignancies including lymphoma and leukemia (advanced malignancies arm).
  • : 3582 Background: The novel structure (non-peptide based) of NPI-0052 (NPI) appears to lead to unique proteasome inhibition (PI), toxicology and signal transduction profiles.
  • Preclinical research suggests improvements in therapeutic ratio and activity in hematologic and solid tumor models, leading to clinical trials in patients with myeloma, lymphomas, leukemias, and solid tumors.
  • METHODS: Patients with solid tumor, lymphoma or leukemia diagnoses without standard treatment options were treated with IV NPI on Days 1, 8 and 15 of 28-day cycles in a 3+3 design dose escalation to a Recommended Phase 2 Dose (RP2D).
  • At the RP2D PK data showed: half-life = 31 ± 28 min; AUC<sub>total</sub> = 270 ± 219 ng/mL*min; Cmax = 33.4 ± 34.2 ng/mL; clearance = 7.17 ± 0.40 L/min; volume of distribution (Vz) = 223.3 ± 229.7 L.
  • Stable disease was induced in 31% of patients, including one each with mantle cell, Hodgkin's lymphoma, follicular lymphoma, sarcoma, prostate carcinoma, and two with melanoma.
  • These data indicate potential for a greater range of uses than other proteasome inhibitors and lead to additional studies being initiated in hematologic malignancies and solid tumors alone and in combination.

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  • (PMID = 27961753.001).
  • [ISSN] 1527-7755
  • [Journal-full-title] Journal of clinical oncology : official journal of the American Society of Clinical Oncology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] J. Clin. Oncol.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] United States
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58. Saglam S, Bugra D, Kaytan Saglam E, Yamaner S, Asoglu O, Balik E, Oral EN, Sakar B, Kizir A, Kapran Y, Camlica H: Prospective randomized study comparing fourth-week surgery versus eighth- week surgery after neoadjuvant concomitant radiotherapy and infusional 5-FU in T3-4/N0+ rectal cancer: Istanbul R-01 Study. J Clin Oncol; 2009 May 20;27(15_suppl):4131

  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • METHODS: During Jan 2002- Nov 2007; 170 pts were randomized to the study in Istanbul University Oncology Institute and Medical Faculty.
  • RESULTS: 17 pts have been removed (M1, frozen pelvis, refuse surgery, disease progression).
  • Distant metastasis is significant (liver, lung, bone) in distal rectal tumors (p=0,007).
  • Important factors for local recurrence and (OS) are having distal rectal tumor and SMP and <2mm.
  • Distal rectal tumors have prone to distant metastases.

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  • (PMID = 27960838.001).
  • [ISSN] 1527-7755
  • [Journal-full-title] Journal of clinical oncology : official journal of the American Society of Clinical Oncology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] J. Clin. Oncol.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] United States
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59. Grimison PS, Stockler MR, Thomson DB, Olver IN, Harvey VJ, Gurney H, Lewis CR, Gebski VJ, Boland AL, Toner GC, Australia and New Zealand Germ Cell Trials Group: Comparison of two standard chemotherapy regimens for good-prognosis germ-cell tumors: Updated analysis of a randomized trial with 8 years follow-up. J Clin Oncol; 2009 May 20;27(15_suppl):5016

  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] Comparison of two standard chemotherapy regimens for good-prognosis germ-cell tumors: Updated analysis of a randomized trial with 8 years follow-up.
  • : 5016 Background: We performed a multicentre randomised trial for good-prognosis germ-cell tumours of two standard chemotherapy regimens containing bleomycin (B), etoposide (E) and cisplatin (P).
  • METHODS: Patients with a good prognosis defined by modified Memorial Sloan-Kettering criteria were randomised to 3B<sub>90</sub>E<sub>500</sub>P (3 cycles every 21 days of B 30 kU on days 1, 8 and 15, E 100 mg/m<sup>2</sup> on days 1-5, and P 20 mg/m<sup>2</sup> on days 1-5); or 4B<sub>30</sub>E<sub>360</sub>P (4 cycles every 21 days of B 30 kU on day 1, E 120 mg/m<sup>2</sup> on days 1-3, and P 100 mg/m<sup>2</sup> on day 1).

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  • (PMID = 27962901.001).
  • [ISSN] 1527-7755
  • [Journal-full-title] Journal of clinical oncology : official journal of the American Society of Clinical Oncology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] J. Clin. Oncol.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] United States
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60. Guida M, Porcelli G, Ruggieri E, Zito A, Mattioli V, Montemurro S, Colucci G: Electrochemoterapy (ECT) for the treatment of superficial tumor localizations. J Clin Oncol; 2009 May 20;27(15_suppl):e13526

  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] Electrochemoterapy (ECT) for the treatment of superficial tumor localizations.
  • : e13526 Background: ECT is an effective local treatment for palliation on inoperable superficial neoplastic lesions from any type of tumour.
  • Recent1y, a new device (Clinoporetor, IGEA-Srl, Italy) has been developed to supply electric pulses with appropriate parameters permitting the clinical use of ECT.
  • Intravenous bleomycin (15 mg/m<sup>2</sup>) were used in all patient; electric pulses were than applied to the tumor areas by needle electrodes in a time window of 20 minutes.
  • After 1-2 months from ECT, we obtained a 70% CR and a 10%PR of the lesions.
  • Concomitant systemic treatment, no rapid spreading of the disease and surgical debulking were related to a better local control and survival.

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  • (PMID = 27961294.001).
  • [ISSN] 1527-7755
  • [Journal-full-title] Journal of clinical oncology : official journal of the American Society of Clinical Oncology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] J. Clin. Oncol.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] United States
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61. Bromley E, Owczarczak B, Keltner L, Wang S, Gollnick SO: Characterization of an antitumor immune response after light-activated drug therapy using talaporfin sodium in a spontaneously metastasizing mammary tumor model. J Clin Oncol; 2009 May 20;27(15_suppl):3052

  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] Characterization of an antitumor immune response after light-activated drug therapy using talaporfin sodium in a spontaneously metastasizing mammary tumor model.
  • Tumor destruction involves direct and indirect tumor kill through apoptosis, vascular occlusion, and potentially antitumor immunologic effects.
  • To provide evidence for the potential antitumor immunologic effects, we have used the therapy to treat primary tumors and examine prevention of metastases in the 4T1 tumor model, an aggressive, spontaneously metastasizing murine mammary tumor model that mirrors human breast cancer.
  • When grown in the mammary fat pad of BALB/c mice, untreated 4T1 tumors rapidly metastasize to lung, liver, lymph nodes, and brain.
  • METHODS: To confirm tumor kill by this therapy, the primary 4T1 tumors grown in mice were treated and animal survival was followed.
  • Recipients were challenged with a tumorigenic dose of 4T1 cells 3 days after adoptive transfer and primary and secondary tumor growth in the recipients was examined.
  • RESULTS: Treatment of primary tumors significantly increased survival (p≤0.01) when compared to animals treated with either light or drug alone.
  • LN cells isolated from treated mice, but not control mice, significantly inhibited primary tumor growth in recipients (p≤0.0001) and dramatically reduced the number of lung metastases present 40d after tumor challenge (p≤0.02).
  • The ability to inhibit primary and secondary tumor growth in recipients depended on the presence of CD8<sup>+</sup> T cells; depletion of CD8<sup>+</sup> T cells from the LN abolished the effect.
  • Preliminary evidence for such effect on untreated tumors has been observed in human trials of this therapy.
  • CONCLUSIONS: These results indicated that this light-activated drug therapy not only destroyed the treated tumors directly but also controlled growth of untreated tumors through induction of a specific host antitumor immune response mediated by CD8<sup>+</sup> T cells.

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  • (PMID = 27962000.001).
  • [ISSN] 1527-7755
  • [Journal-full-title] Journal of clinical oncology : official journal of the American Society of Clinical Oncology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] J. Clin. Oncol.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] United States
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62. Stearns V, Jacobs LK, Tsangaris TN, Briest S, Lange JR, Slater S, Fackler M, Sugar E, Gabrielson E, Davidson NE: A pilot study evaluating surrogates of response to short-term vorinostat in women with newly diagnosed breast cancer. J Clin Oncol; 2009 May 20;27(15_suppl):e14508

  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • : e14508 Background: Epigenetic modifications contribute to breast cancer initiation and progression and may be reversible, thus representing an attractive area for new drug investigation.
  • Baseline and post-treatment tumor specimens were collected for analysis of histone acetylation, candidate gene methylation and expression.
  • Median age was 55 and 80% had hormone receptor positive tumors.

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  • (PMID = 27963537.001).
  • [ISSN] 1527-7755
  • [Journal-full-title] Journal of clinical oncology : official journal of the American Society of Clinical Oncology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] J. Clin. Oncol.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] United States
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63. Presant CA, Bosserman L, Howard F, Emilio B: Patterns of metastatic (met) disease sites in breast cancer (BrCa): Implications for availability of fresh tumor tissue (FTT) for personalized BrCa treatment (Rx) planning (TP) in met disease. J Clin Oncol; 2009 May 20;27(15_suppl):e12004

  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] Patterns of metastatic (met) disease sites in breast cancer (BrCa): Implications for availability of fresh tumor tissue (FTT) for personalized BrCa treatment (Rx) planning (TP) in met disease.
  • Although archival tissue is available in all PTs, FTT testing of molecular, immunohistochemical, and/or chemosensitivity characteristics may be more optimal for TP than tissues obtained before previous Rx and/or new mets, and archival tissue is inadequate for cell culture information.
  • In order to theoretically obtain FTT for development of a personalized TP based on an algorithm preferring in order local bx > para/thoracentesis, > non-osseous needle bx > video-assisted tissue bx > osseous bx, 18% of PTs would have had a local bx, 3% para/thoracentesis, 23% liver bx, 19% lung bx, 17% bone bx, and 12% would not have had a bx because of brain-only mets.
  • CONCLUSIONS: Most BrCa PTs in oncology practices have only locoregional disease.
  • FTT acquisition would be feasible for 88% of PTs with mets for personalized TP, and in most the bx would be simple and non-invasive.

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  • (PMID = 27964266.001).
  • [ISSN] 1527-7755
  • [Journal-full-title] Journal of clinical oncology : official journal of the American Society of Clinical Oncology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] J. Clin. Oncol.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] United States
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64. Khattab TM, Jastaniah WA, Felimban SK, Elemam N, Abdullah K, Ahmed B: How could improvement in the management of T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia be achieved? Experience of Princess Nourah Oncology Center, National Guard Hospital, Jeddah, Saudi Arabia. J Clin Oncol; 2009 May 20;27(15_suppl):10048

  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] How could improvement in the management of T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia be achieved? Experience of Princess Nourah Oncology Center, National Guard Hospital, Jeddah, Saudi Arabia.
  • METHODS: Retrospective review of all patients files diagnosed with T-ALL from 1989 until now with data collection including; sex, age, white cell count (WBCs), CNS disease, type of protocol used, length of survival, overall survival, cause of death (toxic, disease).
  • Overall survival 27/52 (52%) and 25 pts. died (48%); 15 secondary to disease recurrence (9 on UKALL, 4 BFM, 2 CCG 1961); 4 during induction, 1 fulminant hepatic failure, 1 tumor lysis syndrome, and 4 due to toxicities (mucormycosis, staphylococcal toxic shock syndrome, CMV pneumonia, pseudomonas sepsis).
  • Mean length of survivors 4 year (range 4-140 month) and mean length for non-survivors 1 year (range 0.1-40 months).

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  • (PMID = 27962474.001).
  • [ISSN] 1527-7755
  • [Journal-full-title] Journal of clinical oncology : official journal of the American Society of Clinical Oncology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] J. Clin. Oncol.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] United States
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65. Mardiak J, Rejlekova K, Mego M, Rajec J, Sycova-Mila Z, Obertova J, Salek T, Reckova M: Determination of efficacy of TIP combination (paclitaxel, ifosfamide, cisplatin) as first salvage therapy for patients with relapsed germ cell tumors in a poor prognosis group. J Clin Oncol; 2009 May 20;27(15_suppl):e16049

  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] Determination of efficacy of TIP combination (paclitaxel, ifosfamide, cisplatin) as first salvage therapy for patients with relapsed germ cell tumors in a poor prognosis group.
  • : e16049 Background: The efficacy of TIP appears to be suitable salvage therapy for patients with relapsed germ cell tumors (GCTs) with good prognostic features.The aim of our study was to determine the efficacy of TIP as first salvage therapy for patients with relapsed GCTs with poor prognostic features.
  • Sixteen (43%) patients had favorable prognostic features for response (testis primary tumor site and prior complete response to induction chemotherapy regimen) and 21 (57%) patients had poor prognostic features (either extragonadal site or incomplete response to induction chemotherapy regimen).

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  • (PMID = 27963009.001).
  • [ISSN] 1527-7755
  • [Journal-full-title] Journal of clinical oncology : official journal of the American Society of Clinical Oncology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] J. Clin. Oncol.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] United States
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66. Wagner AJ, Von Hoff DH, LoRusso PM, Tibes R, Mazina KE, Ware JA, Yan Y, Derynck MK, Demetri GD: A first-in-human phase I study to evaluate the pan-PI3K inhibitor GDC-0941 administered QD or BID in patients with advanced solid tumors. J Clin Oncol; 2009 May 20;27(15_suppl):3501

  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] A first-in-human phase I study to evaluate the pan-PI3K inhibitor GDC-0941 administered QD or BID in patients with advanced solid tumors.
  • METHODS: A Phase I dose escalation study using a 3+3 design was initiated in patients (pts) with solid tumors.
  • Potential signs of anti-tumor activity have been observed with a soft tissue sarcoma pt on-study for >176 days with stable disease (30 mg qd), an ovarian cancer pt with an on-study 2.8-fold decrease in CA-125 response to normal levels (30 mg bid) and a pt with endometrial cancer with a decrease in tumor FDG-PET uptake (80 mg qd).
  • CONCLUSIONS: GDC-0941 is generally well-tolerated with potential signs of anti-tumor activity.

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  • (PMID = 27961289.001).
  • [ISSN] 1527-7755
  • [Journal-full-title] Journal of clinical oncology : official journal of the American Society of Clinical Oncology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] J. Clin. Oncol.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] United States
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67. Graziani S, Mendes S, Vitório TS, Padoveze AF, Hegg R, Bydlowski SP, Maranhão RC: Uptake by breast carcinoma of a lipidic nanoemulsion after intralesional injection into the patients: A new strategy for neoadjuvant chemotherapy. J Clin Oncol; 2009 May 20;27(15_suppl):e11555

  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] Uptake by breast carcinoma of a lipidic nanoemulsion after intralesional injection into the patients: A new strategy for neoadjuvant chemotherapy.
  • : e11555 Background: Previously we showed that after intravenous injection a lipidic nanoemulsion concentrates in breast carcinoma tissue and other solid tumors may carry drugs directed against neoplastic tissues.
  • METHODS: Three different techniques of injection of the nanoemulsion were tested in patients scheduled for surgical treatment: G1 (n=4) into the mammary tissue 5 cm away from the tumor; G2 (n=4) into the peritumoral mammary tissue; G3 (n=6) into the tumoral tissue.
  • RESULTS: Among the three nanoemulsion injection techniques, G3 showed the greatest uptake (data expressed in c.p.m/g of tissue) by the tumor (44769±54749) and by the lymph node (2356±2966), as well as the greatest concentration in tumor compared to normal tissue (844±1673).
  • In G1 and G2, uptakes were, respectively, tumor: 60±71 and 843±1526; lymph node: 263±375 and 102±74; normal tissue: 139±102 and 217±413.

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  • (PMID = 27964097.001).
  • [ISSN] 1527-7755
  • [Journal-full-title] Journal of clinical oncology : official journal of the American Society of Clinical Oncology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] J. Clin. Oncol.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] United States
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68. Schilling MB, Parks C, Deeter RG: Costs and outcomes associated with febrile neutropenia-related hospitalizations across patients with varying cancer types: A retrospective analysis. J Clin Oncol; 2009 May 20;27(15_suppl):e20560

  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • Its economic and clinical impact is often under-appreciated, and thus this study evaluates the contribution of febrile neutropenia (FN) by tumor type as related to healthcare cost and mortality.
  • Unadjusted mean healthcare cost of hospitalization, length of hospital stay (LOS), and mortality rates were calculated, stratifying by cancer type (breast, metastatic breast, and lung cancers, non-Hodgkin lymphoma (NHL), or other hematologic tumors).
  • RESULTS: Among 598 hospitalized patients (mean age 63 years; 53% female) with cancer experiencing FN, the mean cost of hospitalization, LOS and mortality varied significantly by tumor type ( Table ).
  • The tumor type is important in assessing the economic and clinical impact of FN hospitalizations.

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  • (PMID = 27961149.001).
  • [ISSN] 1527-7755
  • [Journal-full-title] Journal of clinical oncology : official journal of the American Society of Clinical Oncology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] J. Clin. Oncol.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] United States
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69. Nabavizadeh N, Klifa C, Newitt D, Lu Y, Hattangadi J, Fisher C, Hylton N, Park C: MR quantification of abnormal stromal enhancement in the periphery of invasive breast tumors. J Clin Oncol; 2009 May 20;27(15_suppl):636

  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] MR quantification of abnormal stromal enhancement in the periphery of invasive breast tumors.
  • It has been shown that areas with high signal enhancement ratio (SER) were significantly correlated with high tumor vascularity, and that mean SER in nearby non-cancerous breast stroma was significantly associated with disease free survival.
  • Although a relationship between normal tissue SER and recurrence has been observed, the spatial relationship of enhancement within the non-cancerous stroma with respect to proximity of the tumor has not been shown.
  • A SER threshold was set to identify invasive tumor regions, and a tumor proximity map was generated giving the 3D distance of each normal breast tissue voxel to the nearest tumor voxel.
  • The proximity and PE maps were then combined to measure breast tissue enhancement at various distances from the tumor.
  • RESULTS: PE levels in normal breast tissue situated within 2 cm of the tumor region were significantly higher than at all more distant regions.
  • CONCLUSIONS: Here, we show that the normal-appearing breast stroma within 0 cm to 2 cm of a primary tumor exhibits higher enhancement levels than stroma located far from the tumor.
  • These results suggest that tissue surrounding the tumor region may contain tumor-related angiogenesis.

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  • (PMID = 27961446.001).
  • [ISSN] 1527-7755
  • [Journal-full-title] Journal of clinical oncology : official journal of the American Society of Clinical Oncology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] J. Clin. Oncol.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] United States
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70. Lin Y, Jiang T, Li G: MGMT expression in low-grade gliomas. J Clin Oncol; 2009 May 20;27(15_suppl):e13001

  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • : e13001 Background: To evaluate the expression of MGMT in low-grade gliomas, and explore the relationship between its expression and the histological type of the tumour and the corresponding MRI characteristics.
  • We also recorded the preoperational MRI criteria such as tumor volume on T2 image, enhancing volume, tumor location, and relationship with ventricles.
  • MGMT expression level was significantly correlated with the enhancing volume of the tumor (r = -0.605, p = 0.002), but did not correlate with the total tumor volume (p = 0.504).
  • CONCLUSIONS: MGMT is more strongly expressed in tumors of solely astrocyte component, and its expression level is negatively correlated with the extent of blood-brain barrier disruption.
  • This suggest that MGMT may contribute to the tumor resistance to radiotherapy and chemotherapy in low-grade gliomas.

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  • (PMID = 27962757.001).
  • [ISSN] 1527-7755
  • [Journal-full-title] Journal of clinical oncology : official journal of the American Society of Clinical Oncology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] J. Clin. Oncol.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] United States
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71. Witt H, Korshunov A, Remke M, Janzarik WG, Gnekow A, Scheurlen W, Kulozik AE, Lichter P, Pfister S: DNA methylation pattern of brain stem pilocytic astrocytomas in children. J Clin Oncol; 2009 May 20;27(15_suppl):10021

  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • : 10021 Background: Pilocytic astrocytoma (WHO grade I) comprises the most frequent brain tumor in childhood.
  • We were recently able to identify BRAF as a centrally important oncogene in these tumors showing duplication or activation in a majority of cases.
  • Although histologically indistinguishable, tumors with brain stem location have a particularly poor prognosis.
  • METHODS: To identify novel genes involved in astrocytoma pathogenesis, we performed a genome-wide DNA methylation analysis of 78 pilocytic astrocytoma samples from different tumor locations (diencephalic, cerebral, cerebellar, brain stem).
  • BeadChip methylation technology was used to identify genes showing differential promoter methylation among tumors.
  • RESULTS: In this genome-wide approach, we identified an 11-gene signature that was able to correctly separate all brain stem tumors (n = 8) from the majority of tumors from other locations (56/70).
  • Moreover, from 14 tumors clustering together with the brain stem tumors, 5 patients experienced disease recurrence (38%) as opposed to 20% in the remaining group.
  • Genes contained in the signature most interestingly included three homeobox family genes (HOXB1, HOXD3, and HOXD4), and NES, a tumor stem cell marker.
  • CONCLUSIONS: These data suggest that brain stem pilocytic astrocytomas display biologic features different from most tumors of other locations and share a methylation signature with tumors prone to disease recurrence from other locations.

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  • (PMID = 27962622.001).
  • [ISSN] 1527-7755
  • [Journal-full-title] Journal of clinical oncology : official journal of the American Society of Clinical Oncology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] J. Clin. Oncol.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] United States
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72. Bogoevski D, Schurr PG, Koenig AM, Busch P, Kutup A, Izbicki JR: Is there still place for endoscopic mucosal resection in patients with early oesophageal carcinomas? J Clin Oncol; 2009 May 20;27(15_suppl):e15640

  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • None of the 43 patients with high grade intraepithelial neoplasia (HGIEN) or oesophageal carcinoma limited to the mucosa had lymphatic spread, as compared with 15 of 68 (22.1%) with affection of the submucosa.
  • Multifocal neoplasia was detected in three patients with SCC HGIEN (30%) but not in AC HGIEN!
  • Nine out of 44 (20.4%) patients with early SCC had multifocal neoplasia, compared to 6 out of 53 (11.3%) patients in AC (p=0.322).
  • The sensitivity of the preoperative tumour dept staging (endoscopic ultra sound - EUS; and CT) was astonishing low (only 50% for cT1b), as was the specificity (66.7% for cT1a and only 87.5% for cT1b).
  • On multivariate analysis, only histological tumor type (AC) was independent predictor of survival.

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  • (PMID = 27962740.001).
  • [ISSN] 1527-7755
  • [Journal-full-title] Journal of clinical oncology : official journal of the American Society of Clinical Oncology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] J. Clin. Oncol.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] United States
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73. Fyles A, Pintilie M, Hedley D, Bristow R, Wouters B, Hill R, Milosevic M: High interstitial fluid pressure (IFP) and hypoxia as biomarkers of cisplatin chemoradiation response in advanced cervix cancer. J Clin Oncol; 2009 May 20;27(15_suppl):5584

  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • The tumour microenvironment in cervix cancer is also known to influence disease progression and response to treatment.
  • In this prospective study, pre-treatment tumour hypoxia and interstitial fluid pressure (IFP) were examined as potential biomarkers of improved treatment effectiveness in a cohort of patients treated with definitive radiation alone, or with the addition of concurrent cisplatin CRT.
  • RESULTS: The use of CRT improved outcome in hypoxic tumors compared to RT (57% 3-yr DFS vs. 42%, p = 0.045) with a trend to improved DFS in patients with high IFP tumors (57% 3-yr DFS vs. 44% for RT alone, p = 0.056).
  • CONCLUSIONS: Patients with high IFP and hypoxic tumours may selectively benefit from the addition of concurrent cisplatin CRT to their treatment regimen.

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  • (PMID = 27962393.001).
  • [ISSN] 1527-7755
  • [Journal-full-title] Journal of clinical oncology : official journal of the American Society of Clinical Oncology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] J. Clin. Oncol.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] United States
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74. Kelly WK, DeBono J, Blumenschein G, Lassen U, Zain J, O'Connor O, Foss F, Tjornelund J, Fagerberg J, Petrylak D: Final results of a phase I study of oral belinostat (PXD101) in patients with solid tumors. J Clin Oncol; 2009 May 20;27(15_suppl):3531

  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] Final results of a phase I study of oral belinostat (PXD101) in patients with solid tumors.
  • PK was done on day (d) 1 (fasting) and d7 (non-fasting) along with serial ECGs.
  • The safety profile and long stabilizations in multiple tumor types makes Bel an interesting option for further evaluation as a monotherapy and in combination with chemotherapy.

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  • (PMID = 27961343.001).
  • [ISSN] 1527-7755
  • [Journal-full-title] Journal of clinical oncology : official journal of the American Society of Clinical Oncology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] J. Clin. Oncol.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] United States
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75. Bukhari MH, Byron E, Strosberg JR, Nasir NA, Henderson-Jackson E, Bui M, Hakam A, Domenico C, Kvols L, Nasir A: Primary gastroenteropancreatic poorly differentiated neuroendocrine carcinoma: Clinico-pathologic analysis of 68 cases. J Clin Oncol; 2009 May 20;27(15_suppl):e15616

  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • : e15616 Background: Primary gastro-entero-pancreatic poorly differentiated neuroendocrine carcinomas (GEP-PDNECAs) are highly aggressive neoplasms with a very poor prognosis.
  • DATA SOURCES: Pathology archives, consultation files, tumor registry and social security index.
  • All available slides were reviewed and tumors were histologically sub-typed.
  • Of 68 tumors 37 (54%) were classified as small cell carcinoma (SCCA), 16 (24%) large cell carcinoma (LCCA), 5 (7%) mixed small and large cell (MSLCCA) and 10 (15%) poorly differentiated carcinoma with neuroendocrine features (PDCA-NEF).
  • Tumors were positive for chromogranin in 38/65 (55%), synaptophysin in 62/67 (92%), and CD56 in 17/21 (81%) cases.
  • CONCLUSIONS: Diagnosis of GEP-PDNECA can be based on histo-morphologic features and expression of neuroendocrine markers.

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  • (PMID = 27962728.001).
  • [ISSN] 1527-7755
  • [Journal-full-title] Journal of clinical oncology : official journal of the American Society of Clinical Oncology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] J. Clin. Oncol.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] United States
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76. Kennecke HF, Voduc D, Leung S, Cryns VL, Perou CM, Nielsen TO, Cheang M: α-basic-crystallin expression in basal-like breast cancer and its association with brain metastasis. J Clin Oncol; 2009 May 20;27(15_suppl):1025

  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • : 1025 Background: Basal-like breast cancers are high grade tumors with poor prognosis, having propensity for brain and lung metastasis (Perou et al.
  • Nature 406:747-52, 2000, Cheang et al.
  • Clin Cancer Res 14:1368-76, 2008, Luck et al.
  • α-basic-crystallin (αBC), a small heat shock protein with anti-apoptotic and oncogenic activity, is expressed in about half of basal-like breast cancers but only 6% of other types (Moyano et al.
  • Breast cancer subtypes were defined using a surrogate of six immunohistochemical markers: ER, PR, HER2, Ki-67, epidermal growth factor receptor and cytokeratin 5/6.
  • Among patients who developed distant metastatic disease, the 10-yr BCSS survival in αBC+ and - tumors was 12% and 29%.
  • Sites of metastatic disease included: brain (15%), lung (35%), liver (35%) and bone (65%).
  • Brain metastasis was significantly more common among αBC positive tumors (Fisher's Exact test p<10e-8).
  • Basal-like tumors with brain metastasis commonly co-expressed αBC (Chi-square p=0.006).
  • These findings suggested that αBC may be involved in tumor cell metastasis and may allow early identification of a subset of patients at particularly high risk of brain metastasis.

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  • (PMID = 27961038.001).
  • [ISSN] 1527-7755
  • [Journal-full-title] Journal of clinical oncology : official journal of the American Society of Clinical Oncology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] J. Clin. Oncol.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] United States
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77. Park Y, Kim S, Ok O, Baek H, Lee J, Nam S, Yang J, Cho E, Ahn J, Im Y: Risk stratification by hormonal receptor (ER, PgR) and HER2 status in small (≤1cm) invasive breast cancer: Who might be a possible candidate for adjuvant treatment? J Clin Oncol; 2009 May 20;27(15_suppl):564

  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • Identification of breast cancer molecular subtypes has resulted in a better appreciation of the biologic heterogeneity, which is not fully explained by clinicopathologic features including staging system.
  • 1) to identify the risk factors of systemic metastases in patients with ≤ 1 cm invasive breast cancer and 2) to investigate the patients group at greatest risk of such failure even in these small tumors.
  • In Cox-regression model, HER-2 positivity and triple negativity were identified as independent prognostic factors to predict DRFS [Hazard ratio (HR) 8.8, p = 0.003 for HER-2 positive group; HR 5.1, p = 0.026 for TN group] and OS (HR 5.0, p = 0.067 for HER-2 positive group; HR 11.1, p = 0.017 for TN group) in T1bN0 tumors.
  • Limiting to T1aN0 tumors, statistical significance was not maintained.
  • CONCLUSIONS: Even though T1aN0 and T1bN0 tumors have been known to have a relative low risk of systemic failure, anti-HER-2 directed therapy for HER-2 positive group and new innovative adjuvant systemic treatment for TN group in patients with T1bN0 tumor should be considered.

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  • (PMID = 27960726.001).
  • [ISSN] 1527-7755
  • [Journal-full-title] Journal of clinical oncology : official journal of the American Society of Clinical Oncology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] J. Clin. Oncol.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] United States
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78. Abdalla DM, Hamza MA, Kandil AE, Younes LK, Sorrour AF: MYCN gene amplification and DNA ploidy in peripheral neuroblastic tumors. J Clin Oncol; 2009 May 20;27(15_suppl):e22123

  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] MYCN gene amplification and DNA ploidy in peripheral neuroblastic tumors.
  • : e22123 Background: Neuroblastoma is a neuroblastic tumor of the primordial crest cells which are precursors of the sympathetic nervous system and is the most common extracranial solid tumor of childhood comprising between 8 and 10% of all childhood cancers.
  • Neuroblastoma is characterized by a diverse clinical and biological behavior The spectrum of clinical behavior suggests that genetic, biological and morphological features may be useful markers to stratify children with this disease for the most appropriate management Fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) is considered the best approach for detection of MYCN amplification because it can detect small copy number gains and copy number heterogeneity among tumor cells.
  • METHODS: 30 cases of peripheral neuroblastic tumors were analysed for MYCN oncogene copy number and DNA ploidy using FISH.
  • MYCN oncogene amplification was significantly correlated with unfavorable histology, advanced tumor stage increased recurrence and poor survival.
  • CONCLUSIONS:. 1) MYCN gene amplificahion and DNA plidy are poor prognostic markers 2) They should be measured in every case of peripheral neuroblastic tumors.

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  • (PMID = 27963561.001).
  • [ISSN] 1527-7755
  • [Journal-full-title] Journal of clinical oncology : official journal of the American Society of Clinical Oncology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] J. Clin. Oncol.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] United States
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79. Wiechmann L, Jacks L, Patil S, Stempel M, Morrow M: Impact of molecular subtype on presenting characteristics of T1a,b tumors. J Clin Oncol; 2009 May 20;27(15_suppl):11111

  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] Impact of molecular subtype on presenting characteristics of T1a,b tumors.
  • : 11111 Background: Gene expression profiling of breast cancers has identified molecular subtypes (Lum A and B, basal, HER2) which impact upon the risk of both local and distant recurrence.
  • There is interest in the impact of molecular subtype on outcome in T1a,bN0M0 tumors, a group thought to have good prognosis and to be amenable to breast conservation.
  • The purpose of this study was to determine if presenting features of T1a,b tumors differ among molecular subtypes.
  • METHODS: Subtypes were classified using IHC as Lum A (ER±PR pos, HER2 neg); Lum B: (ER±PR pos, HER2 pos); HER2: (ER+PR neg, HER2 pos); or Basal: ER, PR, and HER2 neg.
  • Of 7906 eligible patients, 6016 were classifiable into molecular subtypes and 1974 tumors (32.8%) measured 10 mm or less.
  • Patients overexpressing HER2 were significantly younger, had more nodal involvement, multicentric/multifocal (Multi) disease, extensive intraductal component (EIC), and lymphovascular invasion (LVI) (all p<0.0001).

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  • (PMID = 27963488.001).
  • [ISSN] 1527-7755
  • [Journal-full-title] Journal of clinical oncology : official journal of the American Society of Clinical Oncology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] J. Clin. Oncol.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] United States
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80. Prudkin L, Aura CM, Jimenez J, Scaltriti M, Ellis C, Gagnon R, Arbushites M, Liu Y, Koehler M, Baselga J: Clinical benefit of lapatinib-based therapy in patients with HER2-positive breast tumors expressing p95HER2. J Clin Oncol; 2009 May 20;27(15_suppl):1048

  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] Clinical benefit of lapatinib-based therapy in patients with HER2-positive breast tumors expressing p95HER2.
  • : 1048 Background: Approximately 25% of HER2 overexpressing breast tumors express a truncated form of the receptor (p95HER2) that lacks the extracellular domain but retains kinase activity. p95HER2-positive tumors are associated with a worse prognosis and resistant to trastuzumab therapy.
  • In preclinical models, lapatinib (L), a tyrosine kinase inhibitor of EGFR and HER2, is active in p95HER2 expressing tumors.
  • The aim of this analysis was to test the hypothesis that benefit from L-based therapy is independent of p95HER2 expression in 2 clinical trials in patients (pts) with HER2-positive tumors treated with either L monotherapy (Study EGF20009 ) or L in combination with capecitabine (Study EGF100151).
  • METHODS: Pre-treatment tumor tissue from both trials (N=201) was analyzed for p95HER2 expression by immunofluorescence as previously described (Scaltriti M. et al, JNCI 2007).
  • Expression of p95HER2 was correlated with clinical benefit rate (CBR: complete response [CR] + partial response [PR] + stable disease [SD] ≥ 24 weeks) and progression-free survival (PFS) using logistic regression and Cox-proportional hazard models.
  • Expanded data for p95HER2 expression in additional EGF100151 tumor samples will be presented.
  • CONCLUSIONS: L as a monotherapy or in combination with capecitabine has similar response activity in pts with p95HER2-positive and p95HER2-negative HER2-positive breast tumors.

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  • (PMID = 27961096.001).
  • [ISSN] 1527-7755
  • [Journal-full-title] Journal of clinical oncology : official journal of the American Society of Clinical Oncology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] J. Clin. Oncol.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] United States
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81. Necchi A, Colecchia M, Nicolai N, Mego M, De Giorgi U, Mikuz G, Sava T, Di Nicola M, Pastorino U, Salvioni R: Somatic malignant differentiation in adult male germ-cell tumors (GCTs): Preliminary evidences from the INTera database (International Project for Teratoma with Malignant Transformation). J Clin Oncol; 2009 May 20;27(15_suppl):e16013

  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] Somatic malignant differentiation in adult male germ-cell tumors (GCTs): Preliminary evidences from the INTera database (International Project for Teratoma with Malignant Transformation).
  • : e16013 Background: Malignant transformation (MT) is a rare phenomenon characterized by a neoplastic somatic differentiation within a GCT.
  • An international registry (INTera Project) has been established to collect all past and new cases worldwide.
  • Significant clinical and pathological data have been collected and data files gathered at the Fondazione IRCCS Istituto Nazionale dei Tumori, Milan.
  • 25 pts had MT in primary tumor: 14 of them had no metastases (11 underwent primary retroperitoneal lymph-node dissection - RPLND), and 11 underwent chemotherapy (CT) ± surgery due to metastatic disease.
  • All 14 pts with no metastases remain disease-free (DF) following a median follow-up (f-up) of 72 months (2-236+ months).
  • 6 of 11 pts undergoing chemotherapy remain disease-free following a median f-up of 155 months (8-297+).
  • Following CT, 7 underwent radical surgery and 5 of them remain DF following a median f-up of 77 months (19-166+ months), while 13 could not undergo radical removal of disease, and 3 of them have been rescued by further CT and are DF at 37+, 41+ and 79+ months.
  • So far, all 14 pts with no metastases as well as 7/9 (78%) who had radical removal of disease are alive and DF versus only 7/22 pts (32%) who could not receive a radical excision of residual masses.
  • Median disease-free survival of pts with MT in primary only versus distant sites only was 54 (0-326+) and 2.5 (0-166+) months respectively (p=0.064 - at Log-rank test).
  • Stage of disease and radical surgery seem to associate with outcome.
  • The growing number of cases and a centralized pathology review would help to increase knowledge on this rare disease.

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  • (PMID = 27962924.001).
  • [ISSN] 1527-7755
  • [Journal-full-title] Journal of clinical oncology : official journal of the American Society of Clinical Oncology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] J. Clin. Oncol.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] United States
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82. Arnold SM, Horn J, Eckardt JR, Rinehart JJ, DeSimone P, Fields SZ, Kee BK, Moscow JA, Houchins JC, Leggas M: Clinical and pharmacokinetic (PK) findings in a phase I study of 7-t-butyldimethylsilyl-10-hydroxycamptothecin (AR-67) in patients with refractory solid tumors. J Clin Oncol; 2009 May 20;27(15_suppl):2534

  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] Clinical and pharmacokinetic (PK) findings in a phase I study of 7-t-butyldimethylsilyl-10-hydroxycamptothecin (AR-67) in patients with refractory solid tumors.
  • This report describes the initial phase I study of intravenous AR-67 in adults with refractory solid tumors.
  • Tumor types included: colorectal (8), non-small cell lung (NSCLC) (4), small cell lung (3), soft tissue sarcoma, (3), head and neck (2), prostate (2), and other (4).
  • 21 subjects completed 2 or more cycles of therapy, 5 subjects received 1 cycle of therapy and had rapid disease progression (1 received 2d of drug prior to PD), 1 subject is still under treatment after 9 cycles.
  • Antitumor activity, assessed by development of PR and SD, was observed in NSCLC, SCLC, colon and bladder cancer.

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  • (PMID = 27961852.001).
  • [ISSN] 1527-7755
  • [Journal-full-title] Journal of clinical oncology : official journal of the American Society of Clinical Oncology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] J. Clin. Oncol.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] United States
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83. Ganapathi R, Mekhail T, Wu C, Fischer B, Gong J, Iyer RA, Gan J, Pursley J, Patricia D, Masson E: Mass balance, pharmacokinetics, and metabolism of [&lt;sup&gt;14&lt;/sup&gt;C] brivanib (BMS-582664), prodrug of BMS-540215, in subjects with advanced or metastatic solid tumors. J Clin Oncol; 2009 May 20;27(15_suppl):3566

  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] Mass balance, pharmacokinetics, and metabolism of [<sup>14</sup>C] brivanib (BMS-582664), prodrug of BMS-540215, in subjects with advanced or metastatic solid tumors.
  • : 3566 Background: Brivanib alaninate (BMS-582664, B) is an oral prodrug of BMS-540215, a dual tyrosine kinase inhibitor of VEGFR and FGFR signaling pathways which are important for angiogenesis and tumor growth.
  • The recommended phase II/III dose of B is 800 mg daily.
  • METHODS: A two-part, open-label, single-dose study was conducted in subjects with advanced or metastatic solid tumors.
  • Part A represented the period for assessment of the pharmacokinetics (PK), metabolism, and elimination of B, In part A, subjects received a single oral dose of 800 mg [<sup>14</sup>C]-labeled B containing 100 μCi of total radioactivity (0.125 μCi/mg).
  • Part B subjects received B administered orally at a dose of 800 mg once daily starting on approximately Day 15 to 17 of study.
  • Subjects continued in this study until disease progression or unacceptable toxicity.
  • CONCLUSIONS: After oral administration of single 800 mg oral doses of [<sup>14</sup>C] B, BMS-540215 was found to be the major active circulating moiety in plasma (22.5%).

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  • (PMID = 27961680.001).
  • [ISSN] 1527-7755
  • [Journal-full-title] Journal of clinical oncology : official journal of the American Society of Clinical Oncology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] J. Clin. Oncol.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] United States
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84. Burg ME, Janssen JT, Ottevanger PB, Kerkhofs LG, Valster F, Stouthard JM, Onstenk W, Termorshuizen F, Verweij J: Multicenter randomized phase III trial of 3-weekly paclitaxel/platinum (PC3w) versus weekly paclitaxel/platinum (PCw) induction therapy followed by PC3w maintenance therapy in advanced epithelial ovarian cancer (EOC). J Clin Oncol; 2009 May 20;27(15_suppl):5538

  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • METHODS: 270 patients (pts) with FIGO stage II-IV, Performance status (PS) 0-2 were randomly assigned to 3 x PC3w (P 175mg/m2 with either cisplatin [Cis] 75mg/m<sup>2</sup> or carboplatin [Car] AUC 6) or 6 x PCw (P 90mg/m2 with either Cis 70mg/m<sup>2</sup> or Car AUC 4, day 1,8,15 and day 29,36,43) followed by up to 6 cycles PC3w in both arms.
  • Pts were stratified for FIGO stage, PS, tumor size and center.
  • RESULTS: 267 pts (134 TC-3w and 133 TCw) were eligible (3 pts wrong tumor type).
  • Pt characteristics were well balanced; median age 58 years, serous 62%, residual disease >1cm 66%, FIGO stage II 7%, III 64%, IV 29%.
  • Median dose-intensity for PC3w was: P 58(47-58) and Cis 25(22.5-25) mg/m<sup>2</sup>/w, Car 2(1.6-2) AUC/w, for PCw: P 60(36-60) and Cis 44.7(30-44.7) mg/m<sup>2</sup>/w and for Car 2.7(1,6-2,7) AUC/w.
  • RR after induction therapy in 176 pts with measurable disease was 72% for TC3w and 74% for TCw (p = 0.68).

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  • (PMID = 27962486.001).
  • [ISSN] 1527-7755
  • [Journal-full-title] Journal of clinical oncology : official journal of the American Society of Clinical Oncology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] J. Clin. Oncol.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] United States
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85. Ramanarayanan J, Pahuja S, Elefante AN, Hernandez-Ilizaliturri FJ: Abrogation of tumor necrosis alpha (TNF-alpha) pathway by anti-TNF therapy in hematological malignancies. J Clin Oncol; 2009 May 20;27(15_suppl):7093

  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] Abrogation of tumor necrosis alpha (TNF-alpha) pathway by anti-TNF therapy in hematological malignancies.
  • : 7093 Background: Tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-alpha) enhances tumor growth and mediates cancer-related inflammatory symptoms by inducing secretion of cytokines.
  • METHODS: We reviewed the English literature by conducting systematic MEDLINE using the terms TNF-, infliximab, adalimumab, etanercept, cancer therapy, hematologic malignancies, myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS), multiple myeloma (MM), myeloproliferative disease (MPD), chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL), and lymphoma from January 2001 to August 2008.
  • We also performed a complete literature search of American Society of Hematology (ASH) and American Society of Clinical Oncology (ASCO) published abstracts.
  • Combination strategy with TNF inhibitors has to be evaluated further to determine any anti-tumor activity and their role to alleviate constitutional symptoms particularly in MF/MPD.

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  • (PMID = 27961263.001).
  • [ISSN] 1527-7755
  • [Journal-full-title] Journal of clinical oncology : official journal of the American Society of Clinical Oncology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] J. Clin. Oncol.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] United States
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86. Tanja FN, Hoffmann O, Aktas B, Solomayer E, Wallwiener D, Becker S, Kimmig R, Kasimir-Baur S: Expression profile of CTC and corresponding tumors in primary breast cancer patients. J Clin Oncol; 2009 May 20;27(15_suppl):538

  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] Expression profile of CTC and corresponding tumors in primary breast cancer patients.
  • : 538 Background: The target of adjuvant therapy in breast cancer is minimal residual disease (MRD).
  • However, treatment decisions are based on expression of predictive markers (ER; PR, HER-2) of the primary tumor.
  • Based on current studies, presence of MRD may be reflected by the detection of circulating tumor cells (CTC).
  • Therefore, the aim of the study was to characterize CTC by multiplex-PCR for the expression of HER-2, ER, and PR and compare the expression profiles of CTCs with those of the corresponding primary tumors.
  • Expression of the ER and PR receptor was assessed in an additional RT-PCR.
  • The ER, PR and HER2 receptor status of the primary tumors was determined by immunohistochemistry.
  • RESULTS: The overall detection rate for CTC was 13% (58/431 patients) with the expression rates of 38% for HER-2 (22/58 patients), 25% for ER (12/48) and 4% for PR (2/48), respectively.
  • ER positivity of the primary tumor was demonstrated in 45/58 (78%) of these patients, PR positivity in 41/58 (71%) patients and HER-2 in 9/58 (16%) patients, respectively.
  • The concordance rate between ER, PR, and HER-2 status of CTCs and the primary tumor was 29%, 25%, and 53%, respectively Interestingly, the spread of CTC was mostly found in triple negative tumors (p = 0.01) and CTC in general were mostly found to be triple-negative regardless of the ER, PR, and HER-2 status of the primary tumor.
  • CONCLUSIONS: Since the expression profile between CTC and the primary tumor differs, the consequence for the selection of adjuvant treatment targeting minimal residual disease has to be further evaluated in clinical trials.

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  • (PMID = 27960691.001).
  • [ISSN] 1527-7755
  • [Journal-full-title] Journal of clinical oncology : official journal of the American Society of Clinical Oncology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] J. Clin. Oncol.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] United States
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87. Fedyanin M, Tryakin A, Titov D, Zakharova T, Fainstein I, Figurin K, Polockii B, Sergeev J, Garin A, Tjulandin S: Importance of maintenance of dose intensity (DI) during induction chemotherapy (iCT) for metastatic nonseminomatous germ cell tumors (NSGCT). J Clin Oncol; 2009 May 20;27(15_suppl):e16063

  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] Importance of maintenance of dose intensity (DI) during induction chemotherapy (iCT) for metastatic nonseminomatous germ cell tumors (NSGCT).
  • : e16063 Background: Cisplatin- and etoposide-based CT allows curing the majority of patients (pts) with metastatic germ cell tumor.

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  • (PMID = 27963067.001).
  • [ISSN] 1527-7755
  • [Journal-full-title] Journal of clinical oncology : official journal of the American Society of Clinical Oncology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] J. Clin. Oncol.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] United States
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88. Mittmann N, Evans WK, Rocchi A, Longo CJ, Au HJ, Husereau D, Isogai PK, Krahn M, Coyle D, Working Group on Standardized Pharmacoeconomic Guidelines in Oncology: Economic guidelines for oncology products: Adaptation of the Canadian Agency for Drugs and Technologies in Health (CADTH) technology assessment guidance document. J Clin Oncol; 2009 May 20;27(15_suppl):e17572

  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] Economic guidelines for oncology products: Adaptation of the Canadian Agency for Drugs and Technologies in Health (CADTH) technology assessment guidance document.
  • The consistency and quality of oncology EEs are variable and therapeutics in the cancer care environment presented unique challenges in decision making.
  • Several chapters of the CADTH document adequately defined methods for the conduct of an oncology EE.
  • However, some chapters required more specific guidance to improve the quality of oncology EEs.
  • The goal was to provide direction on methods for the conduct of high quality EEs in oncology.
  • The WG identified CADTH chapters where oncology-specific guidance would be required.
  • Guidance included clarity around CADTH methodology and recommendations for oncology products.
  • CONCLUSIONS: The oncology adapted economic guidelines provide specific guidance on the conduct of EEs for oncology products and will be published as an addendum to CADTH's third edition document.

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  • (PMID = 27963940.001).
  • [ISSN] 1527-7755
  • [Journal-full-title] Journal of clinical oncology : official journal of the American Society of Clinical Oncology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] J. Clin. Oncol.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] United States
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89. Wood L, Garcia JA, Elson P, Salas RN, Lane BR, Klein E, Stephenson A, Dreicer R, Campbell SC, Rini BI: Sunitinib in patients (pts) with unresectable primary renal cell carcinoma (RCC). J Clin Oncol; 2009 May 20;27(15_suppl):5096

  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • : 5096 Background: Sunitinib inhibits VEGF and related receptors, with high tumor shrinkage rates in metastatic (met) RCC.
  • Shrinkage of primary tumors has been observed, although prospective investigation is lacking.
  • The ability of sunitinib to convert primary RCC tumors from unresectable to resectable is of high clinical interest.
  • METHODS: Pts with histologically-confirmed RCC with an unresectable primary tumor with or without met disease were enrolled on a single-arm phase II trial.
  • Primary tumors were unresectable due to ≥ 1 of the following: large tumor size, bulky lymphadenopathy, encasement of renal vessels, IVC thrombosis or proximity to vital structures.
  • RESULTS: 18 pts have been enrolled; 1 excluded due to a non-RCC diagnosis.
  • Pts were unresectable due to bulky lymphadenopathy (6), IVC thrombosis (4), proximity to vital structures (4) or tumor size (3), although most pts had multiple factors.
  • Median age among 14 evaluable pts was 61 years (range, 37-80), 59% male, 76% ECOG PS 0; 79% had distant met disease.
  • Three pts (21%) have undergone primary tumor resection; viable RCC was identified in all specimens with no unexpected surgical morbidity.
  • Nine pts (53%) had primary tumor reduction (median 19%; range, -64% to -1%).
  • Overall, median best % change in tumor burden was 4.9% reduction for primary tumors (range, -43.1% to +8.5%) and 10.7% reduction for met sites (range, -89.5% to +28.6%).
  • Eleven pts (79%) discontinued therapy; 8 for PD, 1 for adverse events and 2 following surgery which removed all visible disease.
  • Eight pts (57%) experienced grade 3 toxicity including thrombocytopenia, fatigue, hypertension, anemia, hemoptysis, and hand-foot syndrome; 1 pt had grade 4 neutropenia.
  • CONCLUSIONS: Sunitinib has activity in unresectable primary RCC tumors, permitting resection in some pts.

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  • (PMID = 27964292.001).
  • [ISSN] 1527-7755
  • [Journal-full-title] Journal of clinical oncology : official journal of the American Society of Clinical Oncology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] J. Clin. Oncol.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] United States
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90. Gray SG, Cathcart MC, Al-Sarraf N, Pidgeon GP, O'Byrne KJ: Prostacyclin synthase (PTGIS) expression and epigenetic regulation in non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). J Clin Oncol; 2009 May 20;27(15_suppl):e22160

  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] Prostacyclin synthase (PTGIS) expression and epigenetic regulation in non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC).
  • Overexpression of this gene has been shown to inhibit lung cancer growth in a mouse model.
  • METHODS: DNA/RNA and protein was extracted from matched tumour/normal samples (Thoracic Oncology Research Group BioBank, St James Hospital).
  • PTGIS in these samples and a panel of retrospective resected lung samples was examined by immunohistochemistry and western blotting.
  • RESULTS: PTGIS was found to have variable expression in both tumour samples and a panel of lung cancer cell lines.
  • The discrepancy between PTGIS mRNA and protein levels in tumor samples indicates that post-transcriptional and post-translational regulation of PTGIS is central to expression and requires further elucidation.
  • Increased PTGIS expression is a potential therapeutic strategy for tumour prevention.

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  • (PMID = 27963661.001).
  • [ISSN] 1527-7755
  • [Journal-full-title] Journal of clinical oncology : official journal of the American Society of Clinical Oncology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] J. Clin. Oncol.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] United States
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91. Bertulli R, Fumagalli E, Coco P, Messina A, Morosi C, Dileo P, Casali PG: Unusual metastatic sites in gastrointestinal stromal tumor (GIST). J Clin Oncol; 2009 May 20;27(15_suppl):10566

  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] Unusual metastatic sites in gastrointestinal stromal tumor (GIST).
  • Nine pts died of disease progression after a median time of 17 months (3-40 m) from bone metastases diagnosis.
  • This is likely to result in a higher number of unusual MS, as observed in other tumors responding to medical therapies in their advanced stages.

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  • (PMID = 27963787.001).
  • [ISSN] 1527-7755
  • [Journal-full-title] Journal of clinical oncology : official journal of the American Society of Clinical Oncology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] J. Clin. Oncol.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] United States
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92. Casali PG, Stacchiotti S, Palassini E, Marrari A, Negri T, Morosi C, Messina A, Pastorino U, Gronchi A, Pilotti S: Evaluation of the antitumor activity of sunitinib malate (SM) in solitary fibrous tumor (SFT). J Clin Oncol; 2009 May 20;27(15_suppl):10571

  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] Evaluation of the antitumor activity of sunitinib malate (SM) in solitary fibrous tumor (SFT).
  • : 10571 Background: SFT is a rare soft tissue tumor, with an unpredictable metastatic potential.
  • We explored the activity of SM in SFT, given the vascular pattern of this tumor and our preliminary observations about RTK activation (with upregulation of the PDGFR family, VEGFR and EGFR).
  • RTK biochemical analysis was performed in 3 patients of this series, in addition to a group of other patients with malignant SFT whose cryopreserved material was available.
  • RESULTS: Between 3 weeks and 3 months, 4 in 5 patients had a tumor response according to Choi's criteria (all with RECIST stable disease) .
  • In two, surgery of residual disease is planned, and downstream RTK signaling analysis will be performed on the specimen.

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  • (PMID = 27963778.001).
  • [ISSN] 1527-7755
  • [Journal-full-title] Journal of clinical oncology : official journal of the American Society of Clinical Oncology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] J. Clin. Oncol.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] United States
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93. Eckardt JR, Ku N, DeMaggio A, Reese M, Levonyak M, Jain V: Impact of direct physician-to-physician contact on accelerating oncology clinical trial accrual. J Clin Oncol; 2009 May 20;27(15_suppl):6613

  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] Impact of direct physician-to-physician contact on accelerating oncology clinical trial accrual.
  • : 6613 Background: The development of more effective oncology agents is critically dependent on the completion of clinical trials; currently, >4000 oncology trials listed in www.clinicaltrials.gov are accruing pts in the US.
  • Unfortunately, only 3-5% of new cancer pts participate in clinical trials and most trials do not meet their projected accrual timelines.
  • From Feb 2008 to December 2008, we implemented this strategy to increase accrual to 5 oncology trials (2 placebo controlled randomized trials and 3 phase II trials in breast cancer, non-Hodgkin's lymphoma and soft tissue sarcoma).

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  • (PMID = 27961766.001).
  • [ISSN] 1527-7755
  • [Journal-full-title] Journal of clinical oncology : official journal of the American Society of Clinical Oncology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] J. Clin. Oncol.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] United States
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94. Ling J, Zhang Y, Hu C, Jiao T, Lang Z, Foster B, Marini J, Zhong B, Puchalski T, Zhou H: Population pharmacokinetics of CNTO 95, a human anti-αv integrin antibody, in patients with solid tumors. J Clin Oncol; 2009 May 20;27(15_suppl):e14593

  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] Population pharmacokinetics of CNTO 95, a human anti-αv integrin antibody, in patients with solid tumors.
  • The objective of these analyses was to characterize the population pharmacokinetics (PPK) in solid tumor cancer patients treated with CNTO 95 with and without dacarbazine.
  • METHODS: Approximately 140 patients with solid tumors from two phase I and one phase II studies were included in this analysis.
  • Serum CNTO 95 concentration data were analyzed using noncompartmental analysis (NCA) and a PPK approach.
  • Extensions of this model can be used to assist in the selection of doses in diverse oncology patient populations.

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  • (PMID = 27963741.001).
  • [ISSN] 1527-7755
  • [Journal-full-title] Journal of clinical oncology : official journal of the American Society of Clinical Oncology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] J. Clin. Oncol.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] United States
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95. Naing A, LoRusso P, Mills G, Berry D, Doyle L, Rohren E, Burger A, Chen H, Busaidy NL, Kurzrock R: Phase I study combining an IGFR inhibitor (IMC-A12) and an mTOR inhibitor (temsirolimus) in patients with solid tumors or lymphoma. J Clin Oncol; 2009 May 20;27(15_suppl):e14535

  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] Phase I study combining an IGFR inhibitor (IMC-A12) and an mTOR inhibitor (temsirolimus) in patients with solid tumors or lymphoma.
  • : e14535 Background: IMC-A12 is a fully humanized IgG1/ lambda monoclonal antibody directed at the type I Insulin-Like Growth Factor Receptor (IGF-IR).
  • Patients with advanced solid tumors and lymphoma are eligible.
  • RESULTS: To date, 11 patients (4 males and 7 females, median age 47) with various solid tumor histologies have been enrolled across 3 dose cohorts with the current dose cohort at 6 mg/kg weekly IV of IMC-A12 and 25 mg weekly IV of temsirolimus.
  • Two patients (metastatic prostate cancer and metastatic breast cancer) demonstrated prolonged stable disease for 4 and 6 months, respectively.

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  • (PMID = 27963555.001).
  • [ISSN] 1527-7755
  • [Journal-full-title] Journal of clinical oncology : official journal of the American Society of Clinical Oncology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] J. Clin. Oncol.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] United States
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96. George S, Lal R, Camidge DR, Arkenau H, Chick J, Poondru S, Yap TA, Eckhardt SG, Demetri GD, Scurr M: Final results of a dose escalation (DE), pharmacokinetic (PK), and pharmacodynamic (PD) study of two schedules of OSI-930 in patients (pts) with advanced solid tumors. J Clin Oncol; 2009 May 20;27(15_suppl):3564

  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] Final results of a dose escalation (DE), pharmacokinetic (PK), and pharmacodynamic (PD) study of two schedules of OSI-930 in patients (pts) with advanced solid tumors.
  • Preclinical studies demonstrate tumor regression with long-term remissions across multiple xenograft models.
  • METHODS: Sequential cohorts of pts with advanced solid tumors received continuous daily OSI-930 to determine the maximum tolerated dose (MTD) and to evaluate safety, PK/PD and efficacy of OSI-930 with both QD and BID dosing.
  • An expansion cohort was enrolled for detailed PD analysis including sVEGFR2 plasma levels, PET imaging in GIST pts or DCE-MRI in selected pts.
  • Objective (CA125) responses were seen in platinum-resistant ovarian cancer (2 PR/8) while in heavily pretreated GIST (median 4 prior therapies including imatinib/sunitinib), 8/18 pts achieved SD ≥12 w.

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  • (PMID = 27961683.001).
  • [ISSN] 1527-7755
  • [Journal-full-title] Journal of clinical oncology : official journal of the American Society of Clinical Oncology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] J. Clin. Oncol.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] United States
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97. Mekhail T, Rich T, Rosen L, Chai F, Semic-Suka Z, Savage RE, Senzer N: Final results: A dose escalation phase I study of ARQ 197, a selective c-Met inhibitor, in patients with metastatic solid tumors. J Clin Oncol; 2009 May 20;27(15_suppl):3548

  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] Final results: A dose escalation phase I study of ARQ 197, a selective c-Met inhibitor, in patients with metastatic solid tumors.
  • : 3548 Background: ARQ 197 is a selective, non-ATP competitive inhibitor of c-Met, a receptor tyrosine kinase implicated in tumor cell migration, invasion, and proliferation.
  • METHODS: This phase I dose escalation study enrolled patients (pts) with metastatic solid tumors to determine the drug's safety profile, maximum tolerated dose (MTD), recommended phase 2 dose (RP2D), pharmacokinetics (PK), and preliminary antitumor activity.
  • Three pts with neuroendocrine, prostate, or testicular cancer achieved a partial response (PR), 32 demonstrated stable disease (SD) and 13 progressed.
  • The 3 PR pts were initially treated at 10, 40 or 90 mg BID respectively.
  • An overall response rate of 6.3% and a disease control rate (CR+PR+SD) of 72.9% were demonstrated among 48 pts who are evaluable for efficacy.

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  • (PMID = 27961350.001).
  • [ISSN] 1527-7755
  • [Journal-full-title] Journal of clinical oncology : official journal of the American Society of Clinical Oncology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] J. Clin. Oncol.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] United States
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98. Mackay H, Gallinger S, Tsao M, McLachlin CM, Kieser K, Eisenhauer E, Tu D, Oza A: Microsatellite instability and loss of PTEN expression in early versus late-stage endometrial cancer: Results from studies of the National Cancer Institute of Canada Clinical Trials Group (NCIC-CTG). J Clin Oncol; 2009 May 20;27(15_suppl):5534

  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • : 5534 Background: Microsatellite instability (MSI+) and inactivation of the tumor suppressor gene PTEN are implicated in the development of endometrial cancer (EC).
  • The aim of this study was to compare the prognostic value of MSI and PTEN in 2 patient (pt) populations, early stage vs. advanced/recurrent disease.
  • METHODS: Archival paraffin embedded tumor from pts with EC enrolled in closed NCIC-CTG studies: stage I/II (EN5) and advanced/recurrent disease(IND 126, 148 and 160) were examined for MSI (BAT 25/26) and for PTEN expression (immunohistochemistry).
  • RESULTS: 188 pt samples (97 stage I/II;91 advanced/recurrent disease) were examined.
  • Overall, no association was seen between PTEN or MSI status and age, performance status (PS), tumor grade or histology.
  • In EN5, microsatellite stable (MSS) tumors were associated with a better prognosis in both univariate (HR = 0.18; 95% CI, 0.06-0.51, p < 0.0001) and multivariate analysis (HR = 0.16; 95% CI, 0.05 to 0.5, p < 0.0001).
  • There was no difference in S between pts with MSS vs. MSI+ tumors overall, or in the IND studies. in uni- or multivariate analyses.
  • CONCLUSIONS: MSI+ tumors are more common, and are associated with a worse prognosis, in early stage EC.

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  • (PMID = 27962490.001).
  • [ISSN] 1527-7755
  • [Journal-full-title] Journal of clinical oncology : official journal of the American Society of Clinical Oncology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] J. Clin. Oncol.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] United States
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99. Liu T, Yacoub R, Graham T, Yang L, Tighiouart M, O'Regan RM: Effect of mTOR inhibition on sensitivity of triple-negative breast cancer cells to epidermal growth factor inhibition. J Clin Oncol; 2009 May 20;27(15_suppl):1055

  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] Effect of mTOR inhibition on sensitivity of triple-negative breast cancer cells to epidermal growth factor inhibition.
  • After 4 weeks of treatment, mice were sacrificed and tumors were assessed for target proteins by Western blotting and immunohistochemistry Results: The combination of RAPA and lapatinib resulted in a significant decrease in TN breast tumor volume (76 mm<sup>3</sup>), compared to rapamycin alone (133 mm<sup>3</sup>, p = 0.01), lapatinib alone (183 mm<sup>3</sup>, p < 0.0001) or control (188 mm<sup>3</sup>, p = 0.005).
  • Neither lapatinib nor RAPA alone inhibited tumor growth significantly compared to control (p > 0.05).
  • Interestingly, in contrast to our findings in vitro, the increase in pAkt noted in RAPA treated tumors was not decreased by lapatinib, despite the significant decrease in tumor size in tumors treated with the combination.
  • CONCLUSIONS: These studies demonstrate that the combination of mTOR inhibition and lapatinib significantly inhibit TN breast cancer growth, compared with either agent alone.

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  • (PMID = 27961133.001).
  • [ISSN] 1527-7755
  • [Journal-full-title] Journal of clinical oncology : official journal of the American Society of Clinical Oncology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] J. Clin. Oncol.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] United States
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100. Feyer PC, Steiner U, Bangemann N, Kurz S, Rudolph C, Schelenz C, Jagota A: Evaluation of side effects in cancer patients during oncological care: A project of the supportive care group of the tumor center Berlin. J Clin Oncol; 2009 May 20;27(15_suppl):e20715

  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] Evaluation of side effects in cancer patients during oncological care: A project of the supportive care group of the tumor center Berlin.
  • : e20715 Background: The therapeutic options in tumour treatment protocols include a maximum of tumour cell reduction and at the same time a minimum of side effects in order to secure a good quality of life for the cancer patient.
  • METHODS: Cancer patients received a questionnaire with 25 items and were asked for their problems during or after the last tumour specific treatment before having the consultation with the doctor.
  • Nearly all of the evaluated patients had some tumour therapy specific side effects.
  • More than 50% were influenced in their quality of life by more than normal fatigue since the start of their tumour specific therapy.
  • Significant differences could be evaluated in relation to the age, diagnosis and tumour therapy with respect to the symptoms.
  • The care givers can focus more precisely on important side effects of the tumour specific therapy in order to improve the quality of life of the treated patient.

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  • (PMID = 27961967.001).
  • [ISSN] 1527-7755
  • [Journal-full-title] Journal of clinical oncology : official journal of the American Society of Clinical Oncology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] J. Clin. Oncol.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] United States
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