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1. Dugoua JJ, Wu P, Seely D, Eyawo O, Mills E: Astragalus-containing Chinese herbal combinations for advanced non-small-cell lung cancer: a meta-analysis of 65 clinical trials enrolling 4751 patients. Lung Cancer (Auckl); 2010;1:85-100
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  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] Astragalus-containing Chinese herbal combinations for advanced non-small-cell lung cancer: a meta-analysis of 65 clinical trials enrolling 4751 patients.
  • BACKGROUND: Non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) is a leading cause of death.
  • We abstracted data independently, in duplicate on studies reporting of methods, survival outcomes, tumor responses, and performance score responses.
  • We applied a random-effects meta-analysis and report outcomes as relative risks (RR) with 95% confidence intervals (CIs).
  • When we applied a composite endpoint of any tumor treatment response, we pooled data from 57 trials and found a pooled RR of 1.35 in favor of herbal treatment (95% CI, 1.26 to 1.44, <i>P</i> ≤ 0.0001).

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  • (PMID = 28210109.001).
  • [Journal-full-title] Lung Cancer (Auckland, N.Z.)
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Lung Cancer (Auckl)
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] New Zealand
  • [Keywords] NOTNLM ; astralagus / herbal preparations / non-small-cell lung cancer
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2. Craig R, Cutrera J, Zhu S, Xia X, Lee YH, Li S: Administering Plasmid DNA Encoding Tumor Vessel-anchored IFN-α for Localizing Gene Product Within or Into Tumors. Mol Ther; 2008 May;16(5):901-906
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  • [Title] Administering Plasmid DNA Encoding Tumor Vessel-anchored IFN-α for Localizing Gene Product Within or Into Tumors.
  • : Tumor-targeted gene delivery has been intensively studied in the field of gene therapy, but no attention has been given to targeting the therapeutic gene products, which are transcribed and translated from the injected genes, into tumors.
  • Targeting immune stimulatory gene products into tumors is the key to triggering tumor-specific CD8<sup>+</sup> T-cell responses and reducing systemic toxicity.
  • To target the gene products generated from the injected genes into tumors, genes encoding the tumor-targeted fusion gene product were generated and administered locally and systemically via electroporation.
  • As anticipated, administration of a therapeutic gene encoding IFN-α and the tumor vessel-targeted peptide CDGRC fusion gene product minimizes the leakage of immunostimulatory cytokine from tumors into the blood circulation, increases the infiltration of CD8<sup>+</sup> T cells into tumors, induces a high magnitude of cytotoxic T-cell lysis (CTL) activity, and reduces tumor vessel density.
  • As a result, tumor growth was more significantly inhibited by administering the IFN-α-CDGRC gene than by administering the wild-type IFN-α gene.
  • The same result was obtained with the systemic administration of the tumor-targeted IFN-α gene.
  • This gene product-based tumor-targeted gene therapy approach could complement any other tumor-targeted gene delivery method for improving tumor-targeting efficiency.

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  • [Copyright] Copyright © 2008 The American Society of Gene Therapy. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.
  • (PMID = 28178490.001).
  • [ISSN] 1525-0024
  • [Journal-full-title] Molecular therapy : the journal of the American Society of Gene Therapy
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Mol. Ther.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] United States
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3. Kottke T, Galivo F, Wongthida P, Maria Diaz R, Thompson J, Jevremovic D, Barber GN, Hall G, Chester J, Selby P, Harrington K, Melcher A, Vile RG: Treg Depletion-enhanced IL-2 Treatment Facilitates Therapy of Established Tumors Using Systemically Delivered Oncolytic Virus. Mol Ther; 2008 Jul;16(7):1217-1226
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  • [Title] Treg Depletion-enhanced IL-2 Treatment Facilitates Therapy of Established Tumors Using Systemically Delivered Oncolytic Virus.
  • : There are several roadblocks that hinder systemic delivery of oncolytic viruses to the sites of metastatic disease.
  • These include the tumor vasculature, which provides a physical barrier to tumor-specific virus extravasation.
  • Although interleukin-2 (IL-2) has been used in antitumor therapy, it is associated with endothelial cell injury, leading to vascular leak syndrome (VLS).
  • Here, we demonstrate that IL-2-mediated VLS, accentuated by depletion of regulatory T cells (Treg), facilitates localization of intravenously (IV) delivered oncolytic virus into established tumors in immune-competent mice.
  • IL-2, in association with Treg depletion, generates "hyperactivated" natural killer (NK) cells, possessing antitumor activity and secreting factors that facilitate virus spread/replication throughout the tumor by disrupting the tumor architecture.
  • As a result, the combination of Treg depletion/IL-2 and systemic oncolytic virotherapy was found to be significantly more therapeutic against established disease than either treatment alone.
  • These data demonstrate that it is possible to combine biological therapy with oncolytic virotherapy to generate systemic therapy against established tumors.

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  • [Copyright] Copyright © 2008 The American Society of Gene Therapy. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.
  • (PMID = 28178481.001).
  • [ISSN] 1525-0024
  • [Journal-full-title] Molecular therapy : the journal of the American Society of Gene Therapy
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Mol. Ther.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] United States
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4. Liu Z, Tian S, Falo LD Jr, Sakaguchi S, You Z: Therapeutic Immunity by Adoptive Tumor-primed CD4&lt;sup&gt;+&lt;/sup&gt; T-cell Transfer in Combination With In Vivo GITR Ligation. Mol Ther; 2009 Jul;17(7):1274-1281
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  • [Title] Therapeutic Immunity by Adoptive Tumor-primed CD4<sup>+</sup> T-cell Transfer in Combination With In Vivo GITR Ligation.
  • : Tumor-primed CD4<sup>+</sup> T cells from splenocytes of tumor-rejection mice in combination with in vivo glucocorticoid-induced tumor necrosis factor receptor (GITR) ligation (the combination therapy) elicited effective host CD8<sup>+</sup> T cell-dependent therapeutic immunity against a murine breast tumor.
  • GITR ligation in vitro enhanced tumor-primed CD4<sup>+</sup> T-cell activity and partially abrogated regulatory T cells (Treg) suppressor function.
  • Dendritic cells (DCs) from tumor-draining lymph nodes (TDLNs) of tumor-bearing mice treated by the combination therapy stimulated Ag-specific T cells and produced interleukin (IL)-12 ex vivo.
  • Whereas tumor-primed CD4<sup>+</sup> T cells or in vivo GITR ligation alone induced a tumor-specific interferon (IFN)-γ-producing cellular response, the combination therapy enhanced and sustained it.
  • Importantly, tumor-primed CD4<sup>+</sup> CD25<sup>-</sup> T cells from splenocytes of untreated tumor-bearing mice in combination with in vivo GITR ligation also elicited an effective therapeutic effect in this model.
  • These data suggest that the combination therapy may improve DC function, accentuate tumor-specific T-cell responses, and attenuate Treg suppressor function, thereby eliciting effective therapeutic immunity.

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  • [Copyright] Copyright © 2009 The American Society of Gene Therapy. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.
  • (PMID = 28178474.001).
  • [ISSN] 1525-0024
  • [Journal-full-title] Molecular therapy : the journal of the American Society of Gene Therapy
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Mol. Ther.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] United States
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5. Carbone A, Cabras A, Gloghini A: HIV-associated Hodgkins lymphoma. Antiapoptotic pathways and mechanisms for immune escape by tumor cells in the setting of improved immunity. Int J Biol Markers; 2007 Apr - Jun;22(2):161-163
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  • [Title] HIV-associated Hodgkins lymphoma. Antiapoptotic pathways and mechanisms for immune escape by tumor cells in the setting of improved immunity.

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  • (PMID = 28207144.001).
  • [ISSN] 1724-6008
  • [Journal-full-title] The International journal of biological markers
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Int. J. Biol. Markers
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] Italy
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6. Terada T: Endometriosis of the Vermiform Appendix Presenting as a Tumor. Gastroenterology Res; 2009 Dec;2(6):353-355
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  • [Title] Endometriosis of the Vermiform Appendix Presenting as a Tumor.
  • Most patients with this disease are asymptomatic or present as acute or chronic appendicitis.
  • The author herein reports a case of appendiceal endometriosis presenting as a tumor at the appendiceal oriffice.
  • A colon endoscopy showed a tumor in the appendiceal orifice.
  • Two biopsies of the tumor showed no remarkable changes.
  • Imaging modalities including CT and MRI also revealed an appendiceal tumor.
  • Resection of appendix, cecum, ascending colon, terminal ileum, and 16 lymph nodes were performed under the clinical diagnosis of gastrointestinal stromal tumor.
  • Grossly, a tumor measuring 3 x 3 x 3 cm was recognized in the appendiceral orifice.
  • Histologically, the tumor was endometriosis consisting of islands of endometrial glands and stroma.
  • The present case suggests that appendiceal endometriosis may present as a tumor.

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  • (PMID = 27990206.001).
  • [ISSN] 1918-2805
  • [Journal-full-title] Gastroenterology research
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Gastroenterology Res
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] Canada
  • [Keywords] NOTNLM ; Appendix / Endometriosis / Lymph nodes
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7. Ulusan S, Koc Z, Kayaselcuk F: Spontaneously Ruptured Gastrointestinal Stromal Tumor With Pelvic Abscess: A Case Report and Review. Gastroenterology Res; 2009 Dec;2(6):361-363
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  • [Title] Spontaneously Ruptured Gastrointestinal Stromal Tumor With Pelvic Abscess: A Case Report and Review.
  • : Gastrointestinal stromal tumors (GISTs) originate from interstitial Cajal cells on intestinal pacemaker cells that arise from the muscularis propria of the gastrointestinal tract wall.
  • GISTs are characterized by the expression of c-KIT protein (CD 117, stem cell factor receptor) and are the most common mesenchymal tumors of the digestive tract.
  • The rupture of a gastrointestinal stromal tumor of the peritoneal cavity is critical complication, although it is infrequently described in the literature.
  • We describe the computed tomographic findings of a ruptured gastrointestinal stromal tumor of the jejunal wall with an accompanying abscess.

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  • (PMID = 27990209.001).
  • [ISSN] 1918-2805
  • [Journal-full-title] Gastroenterology research
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Gastroenterology Res
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] Canada
  • [Keywords] NOTNLM ; Abdominal abscess / Gastrointestinal stromal tumors / X-Ray computed tomography
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8. Tanaka F, Yoneda K, Hasegawa S: Circulating tumor cells (CTCs) in lung cancer: current status and future perspectives. Lung Cancer (Auckl); 2010;1:77-84
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  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] Circulating tumor cells (CTCs) in lung cancer: current status and future perspectives.
  • Circulating tumor cells (CTCs) are tumor cells that are shed from the primary site and circulate in the peripheral blood, and recent studies have shown that CTCs can be useful clinical markers in some solid tumors such as those of breast cancer.

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  • (PMID = 28210108.001).
  • [Journal-full-title] Lung Cancer (Auckland, N.Z.)
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Lung Cancer (Auckl)
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Review
  • [Publication-country] New Zealand
  • [Keywords] NOTNLM ; CTC-chip / cellsearch / metastasis / tumor cells
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9. Guo SJ, Lin DM, Li J, Liu RZ, Zhou CX, Wang DM, Ma WB, Zhang YH, Zhang SR: Tumor-associated macrophages and CD3-ζ expression of tumor-infiltrating lymphocytes in human esophageal squamous-cell carcinoma. Dis Esophagus; 2007 Apr 01;20(2):107-116
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  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] Tumor-associated macrophages and CD3-ζ expression of tumor-infiltrating lymphocytes in human esophageal squamous-cell carcinoma.

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  • (PMID = 28203920.001).
  • [ISSN] 1442-2050
  • [Journal-full-title] Diseases of the esophagus : official journal of the International Society for Diseases of the Esophagus
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Dis. Esophagus
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] United States
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10. Bal A, Mohan H, Chabbra S, Sood S: Causes of enucleation in Northern India (1995-2005). Eur J Ophthalmol; 2007 Jul-Aug;17:638-641
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  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • RESULTS: Between January 1995 and June 2005, there were 139,092 outpatients, 6,574 hospital admissions, 12,044 ophthalmic operations, and a total of 48 enucleations in 47 patients.
  • On histopathologic examination, the lesions were categorized into two broad groups: neoplastic (8 cases, 16.6%) and non-neoplastic (40 cases, 83.4%).
  • CONCLUSIONS: In our setting, non-neoplastic lesions are the main cause of eyeball surgery, as compared to the West, where trauma followed by neoplasms constitute important causes.

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  • (PMID = 28221561.001).
  • [ISSN] 1724-6016
  • [Journal-full-title] European journal of ophthalmology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Eur J Ophthalmol
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] Italy
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11. Darling MR, Jackson-Boeters L, Daley TD, Diamandis EP: [Human kallikrein 13 expression in salivary gland tumors]. Int J Biol Markers; 2006 Apr-Jun;21(2):106-110
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  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] [Human kallikrein 13 expression in salivary gland tumors].
  • Petraki et al have previously described presence of hK13 in salivary gland tissue, localized to duct epithelia and some acinar cells.
  • The aim of this study was to determine whether hK13 is expressed in salivary gland tissues and salivary gland tumors (both benign and malignant), in order to compare normal with tumor tissues.
  • The results of this study indicate that most salivary gland tumors show high levels of expression of hK13.
  • Ductal cells and cells lining duct-like structures showed a higher intensity of staining than non-ductal cells in most tumors.
  • Tumors which exhibited only non-ductal cells also exhibited cytoplasmic staining.
  • In conclusion, we demonstrate the high expression of hK13 in several common salivary gland tumors.

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  • (PMID = 28207129.001).
  • [ISSN] 1724-6008
  • [Journal-full-title] The International journal of biological markers
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Int. J. Biol. Markers
  • [Language] ita
  • [Publication-type] English Abstract; Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] Italy
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12. Rosa MA, Maccauro G, Muratori F, Roda' MG: Endoprosthetic replacement for malignant bone tumours of the proximal femur. Hip Int; 2005 Oct - Dec;15(4):218-222
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  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] Endoprosthetic replacement for malignant bone tumours of the proximal femur.
  • : Limb salvage procedures are considered the gold standard in the treatment of bone tumours.
  • The use of modular prostheses is one of the options for reconstruction after bone resection in primary tumours and in very restricted cases also in bone metastases.

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  • (PMID = 28224591.001).
  • [ISSN] 1724-6067
  • [Journal-full-title] Hip international : the journal of clinical and experimental research on hip pathology and therapy
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Hip Int
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] Italy
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13. Jin SV, White E: Tumor suppression by autophagy through the management of metabolic stress. Autophagy; 2008 Jul 01;4(5):563-566
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  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] Tumor suppression by autophagy through the management of metabolic stress.
  • Some manifestations of this damage, such as activation of the DNA damage response and generation of genome instability may promote tumor initiation and drive cell-autonomous tumor progression.
  • In addition, in solid tumors, autophagy localizes to regions that are metabolically stressed.
  • Defects in autophagy impair the survival of tumor cells in these areas, which is associated with increased cell death and inflammation.
  • The cytokine response from inflammation may promote tumor growth and accelerate cell non-autonomous tumor progression.
  • The overreaching theme is that autophagy protects cells from damage accumulation under conditions of metabolic stress allowing efficient tolerance and recovery from stress, and that this is a critical and novel tumor suppression mechanism.
  • The challenge now is to define the precise aspects of autophagy, including energy homeostasis, and protein and organelle turnover, that are required for the proper management of metabolic stress that suppress tumorigenesis.
  • Furthermore, we need to be able to identify human tumors with deficient autophagy, and to develop rational cancer therapies that take advantage of the altered metabolic state and stress responses inherent to this autophagy defect.

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  • (PMID = 28186855.001).
  • [ISSN] 1554-8635
  • [Journal-full-title] Autophagy
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Autophagy
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] United States
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14. Dobie M: Talc can shrink lung tumours. Nurs Stand; 2007 Aug 29;21(51):28
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  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] Talc can shrink lung tumours.
  • However, a study by researchers at the University of Florida has found that the powdery mineral can slow the growth of lung tumours.

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  • (PMID = 28001505.001).
  • [ISSN] 2047-9018
  • [Journal-full-title] Nursing standard (Royal College of Nursing (Great Britain) : 1987)
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Nurs Stand
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] England
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15. Presant CA, Bosserman L, Howard F, Emilio B: Patterns of metastatic (met) disease sites in breast cancer (BrCa): Implications for availability of fresh tumor tissue (FTT) for personalized BrCa treatment (Rx) planning (TP) in met disease. J Clin Oncol; 2009 May 20;27(15_suppl):e12004
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  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] Patterns of metastatic (met) disease sites in breast cancer (BrCa): Implications for availability of fresh tumor tissue (FTT) for personalized BrCa treatment (Rx) planning (TP) in met disease.
  • Although archival tissue is available in all PTs, FTT testing of molecular, immunohistochemical, and/or chemosensitivity characteristics may be more optimal for TP than tissues obtained before previous Rx and/or new mets, and archival tissue is inadequate for cell culture information.
  • In order to theoretically obtain FTT for development of a personalized TP based on an algorithm preferring in order local bx > para/thoracentesis, > non-osseous needle bx > video-assisted tissue bx > osseous bx, 18% of PTs would have had a local bx, 3% para/thoracentesis, 23% liver bx, 19% lung bx, 17% bone bx, and 12% would not have had a bx because of brain-only mets.
  • CONCLUSIONS: Most BrCa PTs in oncology practices have only locoregional disease.
  • FTT acquisition would be feasible for 88% of PTs with mets for personalized TP, and in most the bx would be simple and non-invasive.

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  • (PMID = 27964266.001).
  • [ISSN] 1527-7755
  • [Journal-full-title] Journal of clinical oncology : official journal of the American Society of Clinical Oncology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] J. Clin. Oncol.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] United States
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16. Khattab TM, Jastaniah WA, Felimban SK, Elemam N, Abdullah K, Ahmed B: How could improvement in the management of T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia be achieved? Experience of Princess Nourah Oncology Center, National Guard Hospital, Jeddah, Saudi Arabia. J Clin Oncol; 2009 May 20;27(15_suppl):10048
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  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] How could improvement in the management of T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia be achieved? Experience of Princess Nourah Oncology Center, National Guard Hospital, Jeddah, Saudi Arabia.
  • METHODS: Retrospective review of all patients files diagnosed with T-ALL from 1989 until now with data collection including; sex, age, white cell count (WBCs), CNS disease, type of protocol used, length of survival, overall survival, cause of death (toxic, disease).
  • Overall survival 27/52 (52%) and 25 pts. died (48%); 15 secondary to disease recurrence (9 on UKALL, 4 BFM, 2 CCG 1961); 4 during induction, 1 fulminant hepatic failure, 1 tumor lysis syndrome, and 4 due to toxicities (mucormycosis, staphylococcal toxic shock syndrome, CMV pneumonia, pseudomonas sepsis).
  • Mean length of survivors 4 year (range 4-140 month) and mean length for non-survivors 1 year (range 0.1-40 months).

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  • (PMID = 27962474.001).
  • [ISSN] 1527-7755
  • [Journal-full-title] Journal of clinical oncology : official journal of the American Society of Clinical Oncology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] J. Clin. Oncol.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] United States
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17. Mack PC, Holland WS, Redman M, Lara PN Jr, Snyder LJ, Hirsch FR, Franklin WA, Kim ES, Herbst RS, Gandara DR: KRAS mutation analysis in cetuximab-treated advanced stage non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC): SWOG experience with S0342 and S0536. J Clin Oncol; 2009 May 20;27(15_suppl):8022
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  • [Title] KRAS mutation analysis in cetuximab-treated advanced stage non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC): SWOG experience with S0342 and S0536.
  • In colorectal cancer, benefit from the EGFR-targeted monoclonal antibody cetuximab is largely limited to patients (pts) whose tumors are KRAS wild-type (WT).
  • METHODS: DNA extracted from archival tumor and plasma specimens from S0342 (carboplatin-paclitaxel plus sequential vs. concurrent cetuximab) and S0536 (carboplatin-paclitaxel-cetuximab-bevacizumab) was analyzed for KRAS mutations by micro-dissection/sequencing and/or Scorpion-ARMS (DxS LTD).
  • No differences between mutant and WT tumors were observed for response rate (p=0.62) or progression-free survival (PFS; p=0.65).
  • Overall survival (OS) was non-significantly higher for pts with WT vs. mutant KRAS [median OS: 11 vs. 8 mo. ; p=0.39].

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  • (PMID = 27962804.001).
  • [ISSN] 1527-7755
  • [Journal-full-title] Journal of clinical oncology : official journal of the American Society of Clinical Oncology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] J. Clin. Oncol.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] United States
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18. Gualberto A, Dolled-Filhart MP, Hixon ML, Christensen J, Rimm DL, Lee AV, Wang Y, Pollak M, Paz-Ares LG, Karp DD: Molecular bases for sensitivity to figitumumab (CP-751,871) in NSCLC. J Clin Oncol; 2009 May 20;27(15_suppl):8091
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  • : 8091 Background: Signaling of Insulin like Growth Factors (IGFs) through the IGF type 1 receptor (IGF-IR) induces tumor resistance to cancer therapy.
  • Figitumumab (F) (CP-751,871), a specific IGF-IR inhibitor, has shown phase 2 activity in NSCLC in some histologies (i.e., squamous cell and adenocarcinoma) but not others (i.e, large cell or NOS tumors).
  • METHODS: Protein expression of members of the IGF-IR pathway, EGFR and differentiation markers was determined in core biopsies from 230 NSCLC pts, including 52 pts enrolled in F trials.
  • This subset included 73% of the squamous cell tumors investigated (N=44).
  • Large cell/NOS NSCLC expressed the highest levels of vimentin (p<0.001) but had low E-cadherin and IGF-IR expression and low fIGF-1 plasma levels.
  • Analysis of anchorage independent growth in NSCLC cell lines confirmed that F activity is independently associated to IGF-IR overexpression (p=0.02) and IGFBP3 under-expression (p=0.009).

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  • (PMID = 27962669.001).
  • [ISSN] 1527-7755
  • [Journal-full-title] Journal of clinical oncology : official journal of the American Society of Clinical Oncology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] J. Clin. Oncol.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] United States
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19. Aboziada MA, El-Sayed MI, Maximous DW, Abdel-Wanis ME, Bakr MM: Feasibility of breast conservation after neoadjuvant taxae-based chemotherapy in locally advanced breast cancer. J Clin Oncol; 2009 May 20;27(15_suppl):e11627
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  • Patient who had tumours ≤ 5cm underwent BC while patients who had tumour size >5cm underwent radical surgery.
  • CONCLUSIONS: Breast conservation is feasible in selected cases of locally advanced, non metastatic cancer breast.
  • We recommend that patients who have tumour size ≤ 4cm after chemotherapy are the best candidates for BC.

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  • (PMID = 27961121.001).
  • [ISSN] 1527-7755
  • [Journal-full-title] Journal of clinical oncology : official journal of the American Society of Clinical Oncology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] J. Clin. Oncol.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] United States
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20. Yin W, Di G, Liu G, Wu J, Lu J, Shen K, Han Q, Shen Z, Shao Z: Demographic features and prognostic profiles of breast cancer patients presenting with nipple discharge in Chinese population. J Clin Oncol; 2009 May 20;27(15_suppl):e22204
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  • METHODS: A total of 3234 patients, categorized as ND (2.47%) and non-nipple discharge (NND; 97.53%) according to different initial signs, were retrospectively analyzed.
  • RESULTS: ND group tended to have smaller tumors and less axillary lymph node (ALN) involvement than NND group (P < 0.05).
  • In Cox proportional hazards regression analysis, we found that tumor size (P < 0.001), ALN status (P < 0.001) were independent prognostic factors for RFS.
  • However, it was statistically significant (global test, P = 0.039), which hinted at a demand for the employment of Cox non-proportional hazards regression in this analysis.
  • In time dependent Cox model, ND status (P = 0.0495) as well as ERBB2 status (P = 0.017), tumor size (P < 0.001), ALN status (P < 0.001) were independent prognostic factors when ND and ERBB2 status were taken as time-varying covariates.

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  • (PMID = 27964133.001).
  • [ISSN] 1527-7755
  • [Journal-full-title] Journal of clinical oncology : official journal of the American Society of Clinical Oncology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] J. Clin. Oncol.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] United States
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21. Petrilli AS, de Camargo B, Odone Filho V, Lustosa D, Borsato ML, Calheiros LM, Brunetto AL, Barreto JH, Ferraro AA: Fifteen years experience of the Brazilian Osteosarcoma Treatment Group (BOTG). J Clin Oncol; 2009 May 20;27(15_suppl):10039
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  • : 10039 Background: This is a 15-year analysis of disease characteristics and treatment outcome from three consecutive studies of BOTG.
  • RESULTS: Of the 604 patients, 578 were evaluable with osteosarcoma of extremities, mean age at enrollment of 14, mean time to diagnosis of 4.4 months, advanced disease (tumors diameter > 12cm) in 45% and metastatic disease in 30% of the patients.
  • Statistically significant prognostic factors were: tumor size, histological response (Huvos grade), presence of metastasis at diagnosis and type of surgery.
  • Advanced disease was associated to presence of metastasis and to a poorer histological response.
  • For non-metastatic patients, OS was 56.5% and 54% and EFS was 53% and 44%, respectively.

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  • (PMID = 27962550.001).
  • [ISSN] 1527-7755
  • [Journal-full-title] Journal of clinical oncology : official journal of the American Society of Clinical Oncology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] J. Clin. Oncol.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] United States
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22. Kandioler D, Pilat N, Kappel S, Gruenberger T, Laengle F, Mittlboeck M, Herberger B, Kuehrer I, Jakesz R, Muehlbacher F: A prospective study of the interaction between p53 genotype and overall survival in patients with colorectal cancer liver metastases (CRCLM) with and without neoadjuvant therapy (oxaliplatin and capecitabine/5-FU): A p53 research group study. J Clin Oncol; 2009 May 20;27(15_suppl):e15003
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  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • : e15003 Background: Mutations in the p53 gene have been suggested as both a marker of tumour aggressiveness and a means of predicting response to chemotherapy.
  • METHODS: We sought to evaluate whether mutation in the p53 gene is a marker of more aggressive tumours or of chemotherapeutic failure.
  • The p53 gene was assessed in all tumours through complete direct gene sequencing (Exon 2-11 including splice sites).

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  • (PMID = 27964362.001).
  • [ISSN] 1527-7755
  • [Journal-full-title] Journal of clinical oncology : official journal of the American Society of Clinical Oncology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] J. Clin. Oncol.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] United States
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23. Stearns V, Jacobs LK, Tsangaris TN, Briest S, Lange JR, Slater S, Fackler M, Sugar E, Gabrielson E, Davidson NE: A pilot study evaluating surrogates of response to short-term vorinostat in women with newly diagnosed breast cancer. J Clin Oncol; 2009 May 20;27(15_suppl):e14508
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  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • : e14508 Background: Epigenetic modifications contribute to breast cancer initiation and progression and may be reversible, thus representing an attractive area for new drug investigation.
  • Baseline and post-treatment tumor specimens were collected for analysis of histone acetylation, candidate gene methylation and expression.
  • Median age was 55 and 80% had hormone receptor positive tumors.

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  • (PMID = 27963537.001).
  • [ISSN] 1527-7755
  • [Journal-full-title] Journal of clinical oncology : official journal of the American Society of Clinical Oncology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] J. Clin. Oncol.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] United States
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24. Hidalgo M, Garrido-Laguna I, Uson M, De Oliveira E, Schulick R, Hruban RH, Maitra A, Jimeno A, Rubio-Viqueira B, Rajeshkumar NV: Activity of gemcitabine in direct patient-derived xenografts and clinical outcome: Validation of an in vivo model for drug development. J Clin Oncol; 2009 May 20;27(15_suppl):4528
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  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • Xenografted tumors were treated with gemcitabine and the activity in the xenograft correlated with patient clinical outcome.
  • Patients whose carcinomas engrafted had a shorter median overall survival (319 vs. 728 days, p=0.002), probably reflecting a more aggressive tumor biology in the engrafted group.
  • The response rate of gemcitabine in xenografts based on RECIST criteria was 8% (similar to response rate to gemcitabine in phase III trial by Moore et al.).
  • In the adjuvant setting, the median disease free survival (DFS) was significantly longer in those patients predicted as sensitive by the xenograft model (568 vs. 286 days, p=0.037).

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  • (PMID = 27962716.001).
  • [ISSN] 1527-7755
  • [Journal-full-title] Journal of clinical oncology : official journal of the American Society of Clinical Oncology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] J. Clin. Oncol.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] United States
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25. de Jong D, Dodge JE, Freedman O, Lo E, Rosen BP, Mackay H: Predictors for optimal cytoreduction following neoadjuvant chemotherapy in advanced epithelial ovarian carcinoma. J Clin Oncol; 2009 May 20;27(15_suppl):5512
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  • DS following NAC offers a survival benefit to those pts in whom optimal cytoreduction (< 1 cm residual tumor) is achieved.
  • Pts with synchronous primary tumors or final pathology inconsistent with EOC were excluded.

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  • (PMID = 27962464.001).
  • [ISSN] 1527-7755
  • [Journal-full-title] Journal of clinical oncology : official journal of the American Society of Clinical Oncology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] J. Clin. Oncol.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] United States
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26. Buentzel J, Micke O, Glatzel M, Bruns F, Kisters K, Muecke R: Evaluation of the effect of selenium on radiation-induced toxicities in head neck cancer patients. J Clin Oncol; 2009 May 20;27(15_suppl):e20698
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  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • Tumour localizations: oral cancer 15 patients, oropharynx 19 patients, hypopharynx 5 patients, CUP 1 patient.
  • Both groups were well balanced according age, gender, localization and stage of the tumour.

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  • (PMID = 27961744.001).
  • [ISSN] 1527-7755
  • [Journal-full-title] Journal of clinical oncology : official journal of the American Society of Clinical Oncology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] J. Clin. Oncol.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] United States
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27. Younger people with gastric cancer have poor prognosis. Nurs Stand; 2009 Aug 05;23(48):14-17
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  • : Patients aged 35 and under who present with gastric adenocarcinoma are likely to have a more aggressive tumour type with both locally advanced and metastatic disease.

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  • (PMID = 28038534.001).
  • [ISSN] 2047-9018
  • [Journal-full-title] Nursing standard (Royal College of Nursing (Great Britain) : 1987)
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Nurs Stand
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] England
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28. Nathan PD, Vinayan A, Stott D, Goh V: CT response assessment combining reduction in size and arterial enhancement correlates with time to progression in metastatic renal cancer patients treated with TKIs. J Clin Oncol; 2009 May 20;27(15_suppl):e16062
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  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • Response assessment by RECIST criteria is insensitive as treated tumours often have only a modest change in size despite the induction of significant necrosis and does not correlate with time to progression (TTP).
  • The Choi criteria (10% size reduction or 15% contrast enhancement reduction) are routinely used in the assessment of GIST tumours treated with targeted agents.
  • Scans from 10 patients were not evaluable as non-contrast enhanced scans were performed due to impaired renal function.
  • Scans from 20 evaluable patients at baseline and 12 weeks on treatment were assessed using RECIST, Choi, and modified criteria in which both a 10% decrease in size and 15% decrease in enhancement in the arterial phase were required to define a response (PR).
  • Response assessment was performed using each of the three methods and correlated with time to disease progression (itself RECIST defined).
  • RESULTS: There was no difference in TTP between RECIST defined PR (346.8 days) and SD (328.5 days) (P=0.965).
  • TTP in Choi defined PR (358.4 days) and SD (189.6 days) groups showed improved but non-significant separation of TTP duration (P=0.266).
  • TTP in PR (421.5 days) and SD (200.3 days) groups defined by a combined assessment of reduction in size and enhancement showed greatly improved separation (P=0.064).

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  • (PMID = 27963066.001).
  • [ISSN] 1527-7755
  • [Journal-full-title] Journal of clinical oncology : official journal of the American Society of Clinical Oncology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] J. Clin. Oncol.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] United States
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29. Bang Y, Chung H, Xu J, Lordick F, Sawaki A, Al-Sakaff N, Lipatov O, See C, Rueschoff J, Van Cutsem E: Pathological features of advanced gastric cancer (GC): Relationship to human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (HER2) positivity in the global screening programme of the ToGA trial. J Clin Oncol; 2009 May 20;27(15_suppl):4556
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  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] Pathological features of advanced gastric cancer (GC): Relationship to human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (HER2) positivity in the global screening programme of the ToGA trial.
  • METHODS: Advanced GC tumour samples were centrally screened by immunohistochemistry (IHC; HercepTest) and fluorescence in situ hybridisation (FISH; PharmDx) in parallel.
  • Variations in tumour location and type mostly explain the difference in HER2-positivity rates between countries.

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  • (PMID = 27963029.001).
  • [ISSN] 1527-7755
  • [Journal-full-title] Journal of clinical oncology : official journal of the American Society of Clinical Oncology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] J. Clin. Oncol.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] United States
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30. Awada AH Sr, Dumez H, Wolter P, Hendlisz A, Besse-Hammer T, Piccart M, Uttenreuther-Fischer M, Stopfer P, Taton M, Schöffski P: A phase I dose finding study of the 3-day administration of BIBW 2992, an irreversible dual EGFR/HER-2 inhibitor, in combination with three-weekly docetaxel in patients with advanced solid tumors. J Clin Oncol; 2009 May 20;27(15_suppl):3556
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  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] A phase I dose finding study of the 3-day administration of BIBW 2992, an irreversible dual EGFR/HER-2 inhibitor, in combination with three-weekly docetaxel in patients with advanced solid tumors.
  • : 3556 Background: BIBW 2992 (Tovok) is a potent, irreversible, new generation TKI, an inhibitor of EGFR and HER-2 (IC<sub>50</sub> 0.5 and 14 nM, respectively).
  • A Phase I dose finding study of BIBW 2992 with docetaxel is reported.
  • Four pts (breast cancer [2], thymoma [1], oesophageal carcinoma [1]) had a PR.

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  • (PMID = 27961365.001).
  • [ISSN] 1527-7755
  • [Journal-full-title] Journal of clinical oncology : official journal of the American Society of Clinical Oncology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] J. Clin. Oncol.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] United States
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31. Spensley S, Gilmore JA, Kenny J, Dunne M, Clayton-Lea A, Thirion PG: Functional outcome of malignant spinal cord compression treated with radiotherapy alone: A prospective analysis. J Clin Oncol; 2009 May 20;27(15_suppl):e20623
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  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] Functional outcome of malignant spinal cord compression treated with radiotherapy alone: A prospective analysis.
  • : e20623 Background: Malignant spinal cord compression (MSCC) is a major oncological complication.
  • The management of Impending Malignant Spinal Cord Compression (IMSCC) remains unclear.
  • Non-eligible pts were prospectively evaluated and followed with assessment of mobility (modified Tomita scale) and sphincter function (continence/ incontinence/catheter) at baseline and 5 weeks posttreatment.
  • The primary tumours were haematological [13 pts], lung [10], prostate [8], renal cell [6] and breast [5].
  • New sphincter dysfunction after RT was seen in 2 pts with IMSCC.

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  • (PMID = 27961600.001).
  • [ISSN] 1527-7755
  • [Journal-full-title] Journal of clinical oncology : official journal of the American Society of Clinical Oncology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] J. Clin. Oncol.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] United States
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32. Reif M, Kröz M, Schad F, von Laue H, Feder G, Matthes H, Girke M: Classification procedure of the German version of the Cancer Fatigue Scale (CFS-D). J Clin Oncol; 2009 May 20;27(15_suppl):e20608
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  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • Cancer related fatigue (CRF) occurs with anaemia, during and after chemo- or radiotherapy and in advanced tumour states.

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  • (PMID = 27961553.001).
  • [ISSN] 1527-7755
  • [Journal-full-title] Journal of clinical oncology : official journal of the American Society of Clinical Oncology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] J. Clin. Oncol.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] United States
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33. Clatot F, Picquenot J, Cornic M, Hamidou H, Tennevet I, Choussy O, François A, Hong L, Laberge-Le-Couteulx S, Blot E: Prognostic value of the expression of tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNFa) and its receptors in head and neck cancer (HNC) patients: A pilot study. J Clin Oncol; 2009 May 20;27(15_suppl):e17029
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  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] Prognostic value of the expression of tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNFa) and its receptors in head and neck cancer (HNC) patients: A pilot study.
  • Patients with high level of TNFa or TNFR1 expression had a worse survival (p = 0.01 and p = 0.009, respectively).

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  • (PMID = 27961678.001).
  • [ISSN] 1527-7755
  • [Journal-full-title] Journal of clinical oncology : official journal of the American Society of Clinical Oncology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] J. Clin. Oncol.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] United States
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34. Fernandez HF, Sun Z, Litzow MR, Luger SM, Paietta EM, Dewald G, Ketterling RP, Rowe JM, Lazarus HM, Tallman MS: A randomized trial of anthracycline dose intensification during induction of younger patients with acute myeloid leukemia: Results of Eastern Cooperative Oncology Group study E1900. J Clin Oncol; 2009 May 20;27(15_suppl):7003
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  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] A randomized trial of anthracycline dose intensification during induction of younger patients with acute myeloid leukemia: Results of Eastern Cooperative Oncology Group study E1900.
  • There were no differences in patient demographics or disease characteristics between the two groups at presentation.
  • In younger AML patients a higher dose of anthracycline in induction should be considered the new standard of care.

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  • (PMID = 27961375.001).
  • [ISSN] 1527-7755
  • [Journal-full-title] Journal of clinical oncology : official journal of the American Society of Clinical Oncology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] J. Clin. Oncol.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] United States
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35. Agarwala AK, Hanna N, McCollum A, Bechar N, DiMaio M, Yu M, Tong Y, Becerra CR, Choy H: Preoperative cetuximab and radiation (XRT) for patients (pts) with surgically resectable esophageal and gastroesophageal junction (GEJ) carcinomas: A pilot study from the Hoosier Oncology Group and the University of Texas Southwestern. J Clin Oncol; 2009 May 20;27(15_suppl):4557
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  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] Preoperative cetuximab and radiation (XRT) for patients (pts) with surgically resectable esophageal and gastroesophageal junction (GEJ) carcinomas: A pilot study from the Hoosier Oncology Group and the University of Texas Southwestern.
  • 10 pts did not undergo surgery for various reasons including disease progression (n=7), AE unrelated to treatment (n=2), and personal decision to forgo esophagectomy (n=1).
  • CONCLUSIONS: Cetuximab and XRT results in pCR's in pts with esophageal and GEJ CA (rate of pCR 13/36), including patients with either SC or adenoCA histologies.
  • G3/4 toxicities, including dysphagia were generally uncommon.

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  • (PMID = 27963028.001).
  • [ISSN] 1527-7755
  • [Journal-full-title] Journal of clinical oncology : official journal of the American Society of Clinical Oncology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] J. Clin. Oncol.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] United States
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36. Bredel M, Renfrow J, Yadav A, Alvarez A, Lin D, Scholtens D, He X, Chandler J, Scheck A, Harsh G: Role of IκBα as a negative regulator of EGFR and a molecular determinant of prognosis in glioblastoma multiforme. J Clin Oncol; 2009 May 20;27(15_suppl):2028
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  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] Role of IκBα as a negative regulator of EGFR and a molecular determinant of prognosis in glioblastoma multiforme.
  • : 2028 Background: Glioblastoma multiforme is a complex disease that involves the deregulation of overlapping signaling pathways.
  • Constitutive activation of the transcription factor nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB) has been broadly associated with various human cancers, including glioblastomas, and their therapy resistance and may be due to cross-coupling with other oncogenic pathways, such as epidermal growth factor signaling.
  • Functional analyses uncover a bona fide tumor suppressor role for IκBα in glioblastoma cells, where it functions to constrain tumorigenic and migratory potential, and induce spontaneous cellular senescence, and apoptosis in response to treatment.
  • Glioblastomas with initially high IκBα expression significantly repress IκBα upon tumor recurrence, suggesting an acquired mechanism to evade its tumor-suppressive and/or chemo-sensitizing effects during tumor progression.
  • CONCLUSIONS: IκBα is a molecular determinant of biological tumor behavior and patient survival in glioblastoma multiforme.
  • Deletion of NFKBIA could present an alternate mechanism to activate EGFR signaling in EGFR non-amplified glioblastomas.

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  • (PMID = 27964596.001).
  • [ISSN] 1527-7755
  • [Journal-full-title] Journal of clinical oncology : official journal of the American Society of Clinical Oncology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] J. Clin. Oncol.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] United States
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37. Harris TJ, Jones DR, Brenin CM, Kelly KA, George K, Moskaluk CA: Evaluation of plectin-1 immunohistochemical staining in human non-small cell lung cancer. J Clin Oncol; 2009 May 20;27(15_suppl):e22118
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  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] Evaluation of plectin-1 immunohistochemical staining in human non-small cell lung cancer.
  • : e22118 Background: Plectin-1 (PLEC1), a known scaffolding protein, impacts signaling pathways and has been found to be up-regulated and redistributed to the cell membrane in tumor cells.
  • The purpose of this study was to examine the variation of PLEC1 staining in human non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC).
  • A total PLEC1 immunohistochemical (IHC) staining score was obtained by multiplying the intensity of PLEC1 staining, scored 0 through 3, by the percent of tumor cells showing membrane staining, scored 1 for <25%, 2 for 25%-75% and 3 for >75%.
  • The samples were then grouped into low (0-2), intermediate (3-5) or high (6- 9) membrane expression and analyzed for clinical correlations to tumor type and pathological staging.
  • There was a trend of lower PLEC1 staining as the tumor stage advanced (p=0.1).
  • As this biomarker is being developed for molecular imaging modalities in other tumor types, it may have potential to be of use in the non-invasive detection of disease or therapeutic efficacy monitoring in NSCLC.

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  • (PMID = 27963515.001).
  • [ISSN] 1527-7755
  • [Journal-full-title] Journal of clinical oncology : official journal of the American Society of Clinical Oncology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] J. Clin. Oncol.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] United States
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38. Parker S, Berman D, Bennett KL, Alaparthy S, Tsuchihashi Z, Chasalow SD, Zhan P: Increased humoral and cellular immunity in patients (pts) with advanced melanoma treated with ipilimumab. J Clin Oncol; 2009 May 20;27(15_suppl):3031
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  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • Humoral response to 5 tumor antigens (Ag) and a control Ag (DHFR) were examined at baseline (BL) and at Wks 4, 8-9, and 12.
  • Peripheral T-cell populations were evaluated through flow cytometry at BL, Wk 4, and Wk 12.
  • Increases from BL in humoral responses to pneumococcal (40-50/78 pts, depending on Ab) and tetanus (58/78 pts) vaccines were noted, even in pts who did not receive on-study pneumococcal (4-9 pts) or tetanus (7 pts) vaccines.
  • Maximum increase from BL of ≥ 5-fold titer (clinically meaningful threshold) in humoral response to tumor Ag MELANA (23.2% of pts), SSX2 (20.3%), NYES01 (18.8%), MAGEA4 (10.1%), and P53 (4.3%) (DHFR, 4.3%) was noted without tumor vaccines.
  • Tumor Ag response was not associated with clinical activity (complete or partial response, or stable disease ≥ 24 wks).
  • Significant increases from BL in percents of HLA-DR+ CD4+ (p = 9.3x10<sup>-7</sup>), HLA-DR+ CD8+ (p = 0.018), and ICOS+ CD4+ (p = 0.0027) effector T cells were noted.
  • Change in tumor Ag response was not associated with clinical activity.

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  • (PMID = 27962083.001).
  • [ISSN] 1527-7755
  • [Journal-full-title] Journal of clinical oncology : official journal of the American Society of Clinical Oncology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] J. Clin. Oncol.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] United States
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39. Wenzel C, Locker GJ, Bartsch R, Pluschnig U, Hussian D, Zielinski CC, Rudas M, Gnant MF, Jakesz R, Steger GG: Preoperative second-line chemotherapy induces objective responses in primary breast cancer. Wien Klin Wochenschr; 2005 Jan;117(1-2):48-52
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  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • Tumors of patients with histologically proven breast cancer that fail to respond to preoperative chemotherapy are thought to be chemotherapy resistant.
  • RESULTS: A major response to treatment was observed in 10 of 13 patients (77%) during preoperative second-line therapy: one patient (8%) achieved pathological complete response (pCR) and nine patients (69%) partial response (PR).
  • Three patients (23%) had stable disease (SD), and no patient had progressive disease (PD).
  • CONCLUSIONS: We conclude that it is possible to achieve objective responses including pCR with potentially non-cross-resistant neoadjuvant second-line therapy, leading to breast-conserving surgery in a high proportion of patients.

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  • (PMID = 28124172.001).
  • [ISSN] 1613-7671
  • [Journal-full-title] Wiener klinische Wochenschrift
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Wien. Klin. Wochenschr.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] Austria
  • [Keywords] NOTNLM ; Breast cancer / Breast conservation / HER2 status / Neoadjuvant second-line chemotherapy
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40. Pucciarelli S, Enzo M, Agostini M, Pizzini S, Del Bianco P, Lonardi S, Friso M, Mescoli C, Urso E, Nitti D: Cell-free circulating DNA as a promising marker of colorectal cancer detection and progression. J Clin Oncol; 2009 May 20;27(15_suppl):11059
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  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • : 11059 Background: Since the pathologic stage is the most powerful prognostic factor for colorectal cancer (CRC), there is a strong need of non-invasive methods for early detection.
  • It has been suggested that cfDNA (ALU repeats of 115 bp, representative of total DNA; ALU repeats of 247 DNA, representative of tumor DNA) may be associated with presence of tumor.
  • RESULTS: The median concentrations of total cfDNA (ALU115) in the plasma samples from patients with stages III-IV and stages I-II CRC, adenoma and normal controls were 52,4, 11.9; 1.9, and 1.7 ng/ml, respectively (p<.0001).
  • The corresponding figures for tumor-related cfDNA (ALU247) were 48.8, 4.7, 2.2, and 0.7 ng/ml, respectively. (p<.0001).
  • With a cut-off of 4.86 ng/ml, total DNA (ALU115) showed a sensitivity of 78.52 (95% CI 70.6-85.1) and a specificity of 86.08 (95% CI 76.4-92.8) in distinguishing patients with CRC from non-CRC [AUC: 0.860 (95% CI 0.81-0,90), p-value=.0001].
  • With a cut-off of 3.04, cfDNA tumor-related (ALU247) showed a sensitivity of 77.94 (95% CI 70.0-84.6) and a specificity of 82.28 (95% CI 72.1-90.0) in distinguishing patients with CRC from non-CRC [AUC: 0.864 (95% CI 0.81-0,91), p-value=.0001].
  • CONCLUSIONS: Both ALU115 and ALU 247 fragments of circulating cfDNA seem promising non-invasive molecular markers of detection and progression of CRC.

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  • (PMID = 27963165.001).
  • [ISSN] 1527-7755
  • [Journal-full-title] Journal of clinical oncology : official journal of the American Society of Clinical Oncology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] J. Clin. Oncol.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] United States
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41. Wosnitzer M, Lee DJ, Hirsch AJ, McKiernan JM: Predictors of renal function in nephron sparing surgery for renal cell carcinoma in solitary kidneys. J Clin Oncol; 2009 May 20;27(15_suppl):e16045
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  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • METHODS: A retrospective analysis of the Columbia Urologic Oncology database found 1327 patients were treated for RCC from 1988 - 2008, of whom 38 consecutive patients underwent PN on a solitary kidney.
  • Glomerular filtration rate (GFR) was estimated with the Modification of Diet in Renal Disease (MDRD) equation.
  • Severe chronic kidney disease (CKD) and renal failure were defined as GFR of 15-30 cc/min/1.73m2 and GFR<15, respectively.
  • The mean estimated blood loss was 465cc, the mean tumor diameter was 3.9cm, and 6 (17%) of the patients had a positive surgical margin.
  • Preoperative GFR (HR=1.01, p<0.01) and the volume of kidney removed (HR=0.93, p=0.01) were associated with severe CKD and renal failure on a univariate Cox regression analysis, but were not independent predictors after adjusting for age, race, tumor stage and grade.
  • Preoperative GFR, volume removed, age, tumor stage or grade were not independent predictors of RCC recurrence.

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  • (PMID = 27963019.001).
  • [ISSN] 1527-7755
  • [Journal-full-title] Journal of clinical oncology : official journal of the American Society of Clinical Oncology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] J. Clin. Oncol.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] United States
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42. Li R, Xie L, Li X, Liu Q, Qian X, Jiang X, Yu L, Ding Y, Liu B: Reversion of physiological drug resistance of weakly basic drugs: The discovery of a new mechanism of PEG-PCL nanoparticles. J Clin Oncol; 2009 May 20;27(15_suppl):e13528
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  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] Reversion of physiological drug resistance of weakly basic drugs: The discovery of a new mechanism of PEG-PCL nanoparticles.
  • In this study, we aimed to reveal a new mechanism of PEG-PCL nanoparticles, namely the reversion of physiological drug resistance.
  • The in vivo antitumor effect of the nanoparticles was also studied in ICR mice bearing H22 tumor with different in vivo pH values.
  • RESULTS: In vitro cytotoxicity study in four tumor cell lines showed that the cytotoxicity of free Tet decreased significantly (P<0.05) when the extracellular pH decreased from 7.4 to 6.8, while the cytotoxicity of Tet-loaded nanoparticles increased or didn't change significantly.
  • As to in vivo study, the mice with in vivo tumor pH 6.8 and treated with Tet-loaded nanoparticles exhibited best tumor inhibit rate and mildest side effect, suggesting that the use of nanoparticles was more preferable than the manipulation of tumor pH by the use of basic water.
  • CONCLUSIONS: Our study clearly demonstrated that the mPEG-PCL nanoparticles could overcome the drug resistance caused by low extracellular pH and enhance drug penetration in the tumor tissue, thus increasing the antitumor efficacy of weakly basic agents.

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  • (PMID = 27961292.001).
  • [ISSN] 1527-7755
  • [Journal-full-title] Journal of clinical oncology : official journal of the American Society of Clinical Oncology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] J. Clin. Oncol.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] United States
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43. Ferrer A, López D, Vidal M, Tobeña M, Serrano S, Pajares I, Millastre E, Ruiz-Echarri M, Lambea J, Tres A: Evaluation of neurological symptoms in oncologic patients at the emergency department. J Clin Oncol; 2009 May 20;27(15_suppl):e20728
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  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • Of them, 61 patients (11%) consulted for a neurologic symptom: 50 of these patients (82%) were stage IV disease and 30 (49,2%) were receiving chemotherapy treatment.
  • Of the total of patients, 14 (23%) had lung cancer; 10 patients (16%) had colorectal cancer; and 8 patients (13%) had primary central nervous system tumor.
  • Tumor progression was the diagnosis made in 27 patients (44,3%), in 14 patients (23%) the diagnosis was a metabolic alteration.
  • The most frequent diagnosis made because of these symptoms is tumor progression.

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  • (PMID = 27962018.001).
  • [ISSN] 1527-7755
  • [Journal-full-title] Journal of clinical oncology : official journal of the American Society of Clinical Oncology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] J. Clin. Oncol.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] United States
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44. Popovich M, Russu V, Lex B, Tulusan AH: A retrospective analysis of treatment in triple-negative brest cancer (TNBC). J Clin Oncol; 2009 May 20;27(15_suppl):e11623
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  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • 6/200 pts primary had stage IV disease.
  • The estimated residual tumor size in preoperative MR correlated strongly with the histopathological tumor size (Pearson Correlation r=0,81, p< 0.01).
  • Stage IV patients with viszeral disease had a median age of 69 yrs and median OS 6,3 (2-12 mts).
  • Preoperative MR is a good tool to predict the residual tumor size after PST in all TNBC pts.

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  • (PMID = 27961112.001).
  • [ISSN] 1527-7755
  • [Journal-full-title] Journal of clinical oncology : official journal of the American Society of Clinical Oncology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] J. Clin. Oncol.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] United States
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45. Dankwah-Quansah MA, Gutin P, Bilsky M, Huse J, Rosenblum M, Abrey LE, DeAngelis L, Omuro A: Patterns of care and outcomes in patients with intracranial hemangiopericytomas: The Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center (MSKCC) experience. J Clin Oncol; 2009 May 20;27(15_suppl):e13011
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  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • : e13011 Background: Intracranial hemangiopericytomas are rare primary brain tumors with a tendency to metastasize.
  • Available literature is restricted to small series of patients, and little is known regarding optimal clinical management and disease course, particularly in the targeted therapy era.
  • Disease was metastatic at presentation in only one patient.
  • Stable disease was the best observed response to these agents.
  • Metastatic sites throughout disease course included lungs in 7 patients, bone in 10, liver in 3 and chest wall in 2.
  • Given the slow growth rates, the meaning of stable disease while on chemotherapy is uncertain.

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  • (PMID = 27962846.001).
  • [ISSN] 1527-7755
  • [Journal-full-title] Journal of clinical oncology : official journal of the American Society of Clinical Oncology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] J. Clin. Oncol.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] United States
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46. Elegbede A, Andrei A, Andrei A, Holen KD: Reconsenting patients with cancer on clinical trials: Does added risk influence continued participation? J Clin Oncol; 2009 May 20;27(15_suppl):e15610
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  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • : e15610 Background: The general policy endorsed by multiple professional societies and cooperative groups regarding patients on cancer clinical trials states that subjects should be informed of new adverse events or significant developments during study participation and re-consented to continue on study.
  • METHODS: We surveyed 34 patients with gastrointestinal (GI) tumors all of whom were currently enrolled in a clinical trial.
  • This could be due to multiple factors, including the terminal nature of the patients' cancer, the side effects of study therapy and the patients' response to study treatment.
  • This data could produce a reasonable adverse event grade cut-off for re-consenting patients regarding new side effects.

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  • (PMID = 27962722.001).
  • [ISSN] 1527-7755
  • [Journal-full-title] Journal of clinical oncology : official journal of the American Society of Clinical Oncology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] J. Clin. Oncol.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] United States
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47. Ke L, Wei H, Na L, Na L, Xin W, Qing-Xia F: Effect of N-cadherin knock-down on invasiveness of esophageal squamous cell carcinoma. J Clin Oncol; 2009 May 20;27(15_suppl):e15571
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  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • Epithelial to mesenchymal transition, characterized by reduced E-cadherin and increased N-cadherin expression, has been recognized as a feature of aggressive tumors, but the importance of this phenotype has not been settled in esophageal squamous cell carcinoma.
  • AIM: To examine the expressions of N-cadherin and E-cadherin in 62 normal esophageal epithelium specimens, 31 adjacent atypical hyperplasia epithelium specimens and 62 esophageal squamous cell carcinoma specimens, and to investigate the roles of N-cadherin in the invasiveness of esophageal squamous cell carcinoma cell line EC9706 transfected by N-cadherin shRNA..
  • METHODS: PV immunohistochemistry was used to detect the expression pattern of N-cadherin and E-cadherin in 62 normal esophageal epithelium specimens, 31 adjacent atypical hyperplasia epithelium specimens and 62 esophageal squamous cell carcinoma specimens.
  • CONCLUSIONS: These results suggest that N-cadherin is an important factor in the invasiveness of esophageal squamous cell carcinoma and N-cadherin may serves as a potential molecular target for biotherapy of esophageal squamous cell carcinoma.

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  • (PMID = 27962382.001).
  • [ISSN] 1527-7755
  • [Journal-full-title] Journal of clinical oncology : official journal of the American Society of Clinical Oncology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] J. Clin. Oncol.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] United States
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48. Senzer NN, Kaufman H, Amatruda T, Nemunaitis M, Daniels G, Glaspy J, Goldsweig H, Coffin RS, Nemunaitis J, OncoVEX Melanoma Phase II Investigator Group: Phase II clinical trial with a second generation, GM-CSF encoding, oncolytic herpesvirus in unresectable metastatic melanoma. J Clin Oncol; 2009 May 20;27(15_suppl):9035
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  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • We recently completed a phase II trial involving 50 advanced melanoma patients (stage IIIc and IV) with at least one injection accessible lesion, including by ultrasound.
  • METHODS: Patients received a single IT injection of 10<sup>6</sup> pfu/ml apportioned between 10 or less injectable tumors, followed 3 wks later by 24 or less sequential injections of 10<sup>8</sup> pfu/ml every 2 wks until clinically significant disease progression, or overall or injectable lesion complete response.
  • Both injected and uninjected regional and distant disease demonstrated response including clearly documented responses at uninjected visceral sites.
  • The overall response rate was 26% (8 CR, 5 PR); 10 responses have been maintained for >6 months and 2 are ongoing at <6months, the longest currently being at 35 months from first dose.
  • 93% of patients (14 of 15) with PR, CR or surgical CR remain alive.
  • Responses of distant and visceral disease provide further compelling evidence of systemic effectiveness.

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  • (PMID = 27962090.001).
  • [ISSN] 1527-7755
  • [Journal-full-title] Journal of clinical oncology : official journal of the American Society of Clinical Oncology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] J. Clin. Oncol.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] United States
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49. Gronwald J, Byrski T, Huzarski T, Dent R, Bielicka V, Zuziak D, Wisniowski R, Lubinski J, Narod S: Neoadjuvant therapy with cisplatin in BRCA1-positive breast cancer patients. J Clin Oncol; 2009 May 20;27(15_suppl):502
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  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • : 502 Background: Neoadjuvant chemotherapy is administered to control disease, make surgical resection possible and increase the possibility of breast tissue conservation.
  • Induction of a pathological complete response (pCR) is one of the primary goals of neoadjuvant therapy in order to achieve a better disease-free and overall survival.
  • The aim of this study was to evaluate the frequency of complete pathologic response after neo-adjuvant treatment with cisplatin chemotherapy in women with breast cancer and a BRCA1 mutation.
  • METHODS: Twenty five women with breast cancer and a BRCA1 mutation with stage I, II, and III breast cancer between December 2006 and December 2008 were entered into this study.
  • Complete pathologic response was defined as no residual invasive disease in both the breast and axilla, however ductal carcinoma in situ was allowed.
  • Thirteen patients had tumors of greater than two centimeters (52%) and seven patients had positive lymph nodes at diagnosis (28%).

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  • (PMID = 27960785.001).
  • [ISSN] 1527-7755
  • [Journal-full-title] Journal of clinical oncology : official journal of the American Society of Clinical Oncology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] J. Clin. Oncol.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] United States
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50. Ionta M, Atzori F, Murgia M, Frau B, Barca M, Coinu A, Trogu A, Eltrudis F, Minerba L, Massidda B: Adding cisplatin to an anthracycline-based primary chemotherapy in triple-negative (TN) and non-triple negative (non-TN) T4 breast cancer patients (pts): Long-term outcomes. J Clin Oncol; 2009 May 20;27(15_suppl):583
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  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] Adding cisplatin to an anthracycline-based primary chemotherapy in triple-negative (TN) and non-triple negative (non-TN) T4 breast cancer patients (pts): Long-term outcomes.
  • Conversely, there is extensive preclinical work showing that TN tumors are highly sensitive to platinum agents.
  • Only a few studies compared cisplatin vs non-cisplatin containing regimens among TN or non-TN homogeneous populations.
  • The aim of this study was to evaluate the efficacy in terms of long-term outcomes of adding cisplatin to an anthracycline-based neoadjuvant regimen (cisplatin, C) compared with a standard anthracycline-based (Non-C) regimen in T4 breast cancer according to TN or non-TN status.
  • METHODS: We retrospectively analyzed 125 consecutive T4 breast cancer pts available for ER/PR and HER2 status; 98 pts (80%) were non-TN, of whom 63 treated with Non-C and 35 treated with C regimen; 27 pts (20%) were TN, of whom 10 treated with Non-C and 17 treated with C regimen.
  • RESULTS: At a median follow-up of 101 months (8-217), estimated 10-year DFS and OS in TN pts treated with C were 47% and 59% versus 10% and 30% in pts treated with Non-C.
  • In non-TN pts DFS and OS were 57% and 70% in pts treated with C versus 37% and 49% in pts treated with Non-C.
  • CONCLUSIONS: Our data suggest that both TN and non-TN pts derive a better outcomes from the add of cisplatin over a standard anthracycline-based regimen.

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  • (PMID = 27960694.001).
  • [ISSN] 1527-7755
  • [Journal-full-title] Journal of clinical oncology : official journal of the American Society of Clinical Oncology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] J. Clin. Oncol.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] United States
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51. Chambers AJ, Murynka T, Arlette JP, Mckinnon JG: Invasive melanoma of the face: Patterns of local and regional disease in 261 patients managed at a single institution. J Clin Oncol; 2009 May 20;27(15_suppl):e20015
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  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] Invasive melanoma of the face: Patterns of local and regional disease in 261 patients managed at a single institution.
  • METHODS: Patients with invasive melanoma of the face managed from 1997-2008 were identified from a large population-based tumor registry and retrospectively reviewed.
  • RESULTS: 261 patients were reviewed, mean age 68 and median tumor thickness 0.87mm.
  • Of 108 patients who were eligible for SNB (with tumor thickness >1mm, Clark level ≥IV or ulceration) this was performed in only 29 (27%).
  • Regional nodal recurrence occurred in 10 (3.8%); after negative SNB in 1 (SNB failure rate 3.7%), after unsuccessful SNB in 1, following neck dissection for nodal disease at presentation in 1, and in 7 who did not undergo SNB (including 6 patients who were eligible).
  • Due to the older age of patients with facial melanoma, most deaths occurring are from unrelated conditions, and distant metastatic disease was seen in only a small percentage of cases.

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  • (PMID = 27962558.001).
  • [ISSN] 1527-7755
  • [Journal-full-title] Journal of clinical oncology : official journal of the American Society of Clinical Oncology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] J. Clin. Oncol.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] United States
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52. Zakrzewski JA, Geraghty L, Hamilton H, Christos P, Krich D, Mazumdar M, Polsky D, Darvishian F, Pavlick A, Osman I: Prospective analysis of predictors of survival in melanoma patients with brain metastases. J Clin Oncol; 2009 May 20;27(15_suppl):9074
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  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • A recent retrospective analysis at Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center (MSKCC) identified 4 clinical variables that were associated with worse post BM survival (Raizer J et al, Neuro Oncol 2008).
  • In this study, we investigated whether primary tumor features could improve the predictability of post BM survival and examined the reproducibility of the variables identified in MSKCC study.
  • Six primary tumor characteristics, 21 clinical variables, and treatments were examined.
  • After reproducing the significance of the 4 MSKCC variables in a multivariate model, ulceration of the primary tumor was also an independent predictor of post BM survival (hazard ratio [HR] = 2.75; 95% CI = 1.30, 5.83; p=0.008) whereas mitotic index ≥3/field was not (HR=1.24; 95% CI = 0.57, 2.71; p=0.59).

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  • (PMID = 27962179.001).
  • [ISSN] 1527-7755
  • [Journal-full-title] Journal of clinical oncology : official journal of the American Society of Clinical Oncology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] J. Clin. Oncol.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] United States
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53. Frankenthaler A, Lee M, Seery V, Renzi S, Kinnaman M, Liu V, Friedman E, Atkins MB, Cutaneous Oncology Program: Impact of concomitant immunosuppression on the presentation and prognosis of patients with melanoma. J Clin Oncol; 2009 May 20;27(15_suppl):9070
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  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • Therefore, we hypothesized that concomitant immune suppression might impact the course of the disease.
  • METHODS: We examined the Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center Cutaneous Oncology Program database for pts with immune suppression at the time of melanoma diagnosis.
  • In addition, 3 controls matched for age, gender, stage and tumor location were identified for each case and disease outcome was compared between cases and controls.
  • Compared to the database as a whole, cases were more likely to be female (84% vs 45%) and have a higher disease stage (42% stage IIIB/C vs 26%).
  • In addition, more cases appeared to have an amelanotic primary (21% vs. 5.4%) or an atypical mole syndrome (21% vs 10.2%).
  • For pts who relapsed, the cases had a shorter disease free interval (DFI) (2.1 vs 9.7 yrs) than the controls.
  • As a consequence, cases appeared more likely to have died of their disease than controls (42% vs 23%) (p=0.10).
  • CONCLUSIONS: Compared to the general melanoma population, pts with concomitant immune suppression appear more likely to be female, have an amelanotic primary or atypical mole syndrome and more advanced disease at presentation.
  • Although pts with concomitant immune suppression are equally likely to relapse compared to matched controls, those that relapse appear to have a shorter DFI and to be less likely to be salvaged, suggesting more aggressive tumor behavior in this setting.

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  • (PMID = 27962173.001).
  • [ISSN] 1527-7755
  • [Journal-full-title] Journal of clinical oncology : official journal of the American Society of Clinical Oncology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] J. Clin. Oncol.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] United States
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54. Bickell N, Weidmann J, Fei K, Leventhal H: Underuse of breast cancer adjuvant treatment: Patients' knowledge, beliefs, and medical mistrust. J Clin Oncol; 2009 May 20;27(15_suppl):6521
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  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • : 6521 Background: We surveyed breast cancer patients in New York City to understand why women did not receive radiotherapy (RT) following lumpectomy, chemotherapy, or hormonal therapy for hormone receptor negative or positive tumors >1 cm, respectively.
  • METHODS: 258 New York City women recently surgically treated for a new primary stage I or II breast cancer were surveyed about their experience of care, knowledge and beliefs about breast cancer and its treatment.

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  • (PMID = 27964027.001).
  • [ISSN] 1527-7755
  • [Journal-full-title] Journal of clinical oncology : official journal of the American Society of Clinical Oncology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] J. Clin. Oncol.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] United States
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55. Johnson ML, Rizvi NA, Ginsberg MS, Miller VA, Kris MG, Pao W, Riely GJ: A phase II trial of salirasib in patients with stage IIIB/IV lung adenocarcinoma enriched for KRAS mutations. J Clin Oncol; 2009 May 20;27(15_suppl):8012
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  • Salirasib inhibits KRAS-dependent growth in cell lines and xenograft models.
  • The primary endpoint was rate of RECIST non-progression at 10 wks.
  • All 23 pts in Group A and 7/10 pts in Group B had KRAS mutations.
  • The RR in pts was 0/18 for Group A and 0/8 in Group B.
  • The median TTP was 1 month (mo) and 2 mo in Groups A and B, respectively.
  • The median OS was 13 mo for Group B and not reached in Group A (median follow-up 3 mo).
  • CONCLUSIONS: After 10 wks of salirasib, 28% of previously treated pts with KRAS mutations and 38% of untreated pts had stable disease.
  • The successful enrollment over 15 months of 29 pts with tumors with known KRAS mutations demonstrates that trials of a KRAS-specific genotype in lung cancer are feasible, and should be standard in future studies targeting the KRAS pathway.

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  • (PMID = 27962781.001).
  • [ISSN] 1527-7755
  • [Journal-full-title] Journal of clinical oncology : official journal of the American Society of Clinical Oncology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] J. Clin. Oncol.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] United States
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56. Coleman RL, Kamat A, Iyer R, Kundra V, Garcia M, Jaffe RB, Sood AK: Phase I and pharmacokinetic study of the novel VEGF-directed fusion protein, aflibercept, in combination with docetaxel in women with recurrent ovarian, fallopian tube, and primary peritoneal cancer. J Clin Oncol; 2009 May 20;27(15_suppl):5549
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  • : 5549 Background: VEGF blockade has proved to be a promising therapeutic strategy in solid tumors, including ovarian.
  • Aflibercept, a novel fusion protein consisting of the extracellular domains of VEGFR1/2 binds VEGF A, B and PlGF.
  • METHODS: Eligible patients had measurable, recurrent disease with no more than 3 prior chemotherapeutic regimens.
  • Non-hematological toxicities (Gr 3) included headache, hypertension, fatigue and ulceration.
  • Confirmed PR was observed in 2 (22%) with 1 additional near PR.

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  • (PMID = 27962505.001).
  • [ISSN] 1527-7755
  • [Journal-full-title] Journal of clinical oncology : official journal of the American Society of Clinical Oncology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] J. Clin. Oncol.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] United States
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57. Agarwala SS, Thompson J, Smithers M, Ross M, Coventry B, Minor D, Scoggins C, Hersey P, Wachter E: Chemoablation of melanoma with intralesional rose bengal (PV-10). J Clin Oncol; 2009 May 20;27(15_suppl):9060
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  • : 9060 Background: Intralesional rose bengal (PV-10, a sterile 10% solution in saline) can elicit selective ablation of solid tumors and an apparent bystander response in untreated lesions.
  • In phase 1 testing in 20 subjects with AJCC Stage III (19 subjects) or IV (1 subject) melanoma, a single injection of PV-10 into 1-20 lesions led to durable objective response (OR) at 12-24 weeks in 40% of subjects (20% CR + 20% PR by modified RECIST) and locoregional disease control (CR + PR + SD) in 75% of subjects.
  • Untreated bystander lesions achieved an OR in 15% of subjects, and all subjects with an OR of their injected lesions achieved disease control of their bystander lesions.
  • After an initial treatment of 1-20 cutaneous, subcutaneous or nodal lesions, new or incompletely responsive lesions can be retreated at weeks 8, 12 or 16, with follow-up to 52 weeks.
  • An additional 1-2 lesions, including visceral lesions, remain untreated for assessment of bystander response.
  • Interim efficacy for the first 20 subjects is also comparable to that of phase 1 (15% CR + 15% PR); efficacy data for the first 40 subjects will be presented at the meeting.

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  • (PMID = 27962145.001).
  • [ISSN] 1527-7755
  • [Journal-full-title] Journal of clinical oncology : official journal of the American Society of Clinical Oncology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] J. Clin. Oncol.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] United States
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58. Hoffman AC, Wild P, Gauler T, Leicht C, Bertz S, Danenberg KD, Danenberg PV, Stöhr R, Stöckle M, Lehmann J, Hartmann A: Correlation of multidrug-resistance gene (MDR1) expression levels and outcome to adjuvant cisplatin/MTX based chemotherapy in patients enrolled in the AUO-AB 05/95 phase III trial. J Clin Oncol; 2009 May 20;27(15_suppl):5026
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  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • METHODS: 221 formalin fixed paraffin embedded (FFPE) tumor samples from patients with locally advanced and/or lymph node-positive bladder cancer enrolled for adjuvant therapy in the AUO-AB 05/95 phase III trial (Lehmann et al, J Clin Oncol.
  • Gene expression values (relative mRNA levels) are expressed as ratios between the target gene and internal reference gene (beta-actin).
  • We included tumor stage (pT), lymph node status (pN) and the blood vessel invasion along with the measured gene expression in a stepwise multivariate Cox proportional hazards regression model.

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  • (PMID = 27962916.001).
  • [ISSN] 1527-7755
  • [Journal-full-title] Journal of clinical oncology : official journal of the American Society of Clinical Oncology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] J. Clin. Oncol.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] United States
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59. Costa FP, de Oliveira AC, Meirelles R, Machado MM, Surjan R, Chammas M, Bottger B, Morgan D, Barbault A, Pasche B: Phase II study of intrabuccally-administered amplitude-modulated electromagnetic fields in patients with advanced hepatocellular carcinoma. J Clin Oncol; 2009 May 20;27(15_suppl):e15573
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  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • : e15573 Background: Over the past few years we have identified tumor-specific frequencies for several common forms of cancer.
  • The goal of this study was to assess the tolerability and effectiveness of electromagnetic fields amplitude-modulated at tumor-specific frequencies and administered by means of an intrabuccal spoon-shaped probe in patients with advanced hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC).
  • Three daily 60 min outpatient treatments were administered until disease progression or death.
  • RESULTS: A total of 41 patients were enrolled, 17 had Child-Pugh A, 20 Child-Pugh B disease.
  • Four patients had partial response (9.8%) and sixteen had stable disease for at least 12 weeks (39.0%) according to the RECIST criteria resulting in 48.8% disease control.
  • CONCLUSIONS: In patients with advanced HCC and impaired hepatic function, treatment with amplitude-modulated electromagnetic fields is safe, well tolerated, and shows evidence of anti-tumor effects, which are long-lasting in some patients.

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  • (PMID = 27962384.001).
  • [ISSN] 1527-7755
  • [Journal-full-title] Journal of clinical oncology : official journal of the American Society of Clinical Oncology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] J. Clin. Oncol.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] United States
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60. Shepard RC, Talluto CC, Jacob G: Phase I study results of nanomolecular liposomal annamycin in refractory ALL. J Clin Oncol; 2009 May 20;27(15_suppl):7066
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  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • The other 2 had tumor lysis syndrome and unfortunately expired.
  • Other than the tumor lysis syndromes, there was only 1 SAE definitely related to the study drug which was a grade 3 mucositis but there were also 3 other SAEs of grade 3 or 4 mucositis probably related to the study drug which comprised the MTD determination.

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  • (PMID = 27961442.001).
  • [ISSN] 1527-7755
  • [Journal-full-title] Journal of clinical oncology : official journal of the American Society of Clinical Oncology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] J. Clin. Oncol.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] United States
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61. Maréchal R, Demetter P, Berton A, Salmon I, Van Laethem J: Correlation of CXCR4 expression in resected pancreatic adenocarcinoma (PA) with relapse and survival after adjuvant radiochemotherapy (RCT). J Clin Oncol; 2009 May 20;27(15_suppl):e22022
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  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • : e22022 Background: The chemoreceptors CXCR4, CXCR7 and the hypoxia inductible factor-1 alpha (HIF-1α) are implicated in PA growth, dissemination and angiogenesis.
  • Based on the intensity (I) and the extend (E) of staining, cases were stratified into those with high (E x I>3) or low (E x I ≤ 3) expression of CXCR4, CXCR7 and HIF-1α and results were correlated with disease-free survival (DFS) and overall survival (OS).
  • The two groups were well-matched in terms of age, sex, tumor stage (T1-T2 vs T3-T4), tumor differentiation (poor vs well-moderate), lymph node (LN) status (N0 vs N+), lymphatic and vascular embols.

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  • (PMID = 27963130.001).
  • [ISSN] 1527-7755
  • [Journal-full-title] Journal of clinical oncology : official journal of the American Society of Clinical Oncology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] J. Clin. Oncol.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] United States
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62. Cadranel J, Beau-Faller M, Mauguen A, Lizard S, Madelaine J, Lansiaux A, Prétet J, Madroszyk A, Chouaid C, Morin F: Biological and clinical prognostic factors in patients with advanced non-small-cell cancer (NSCLC) treated by erlotinib: Preliminary results of the ERMETIC cohort. J Clin Oncol; 2009 May 20;27(15_suppl):8079
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  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] Biological and clinical prognostic factors in patients with advanced non-small-cell cancer (NSCLC) treated by erlotinib: Preliminary results of the ERMETIC cohort.
  • METHODS: After a preliminary phase of validation in 16 French centers, these biomarkers were studied in available tumor specimens collected from all consecutive NSCLC patients (pts) treated by erlotinib, for the first time.
  • RESULTS: 493 of the 530 enrolled pts between 02/07 and 03/08 are included in this analysis, among whom at least 357 (72%) tumor specimens were collected.

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  • (PMID = 27962666.001).
  • [ISSN] 1527-7755
  • [Journal-full-title] Journal of clinical oncology : official journal of the American Society of Clinical Oncology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] J. Clin. Oncol.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] United States
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63. Bahl G, Urbach S, Bartels U, Hodgson DC, Millar B, Parent A, Le L, Awrey S, Laperriere N: Endocrine complications in children treated for medulloblastoma or ependymoma using radiation therapy. Outcomes in the CT-planning era. J Clin Oncol; 2009 May 20;27(15_suppl):10064
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  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • Twenty-two received highly conformal RT to the tumor bed alone (focal RT: median dose 54 Gy, range 54-59.4), 24 received low dose cranio-spinal RT (CSI: median dose 23.4 Gy) followed by a boost to the post fossa/tumor bed (median 30.6 Gy), and 24 patients received high dose CSI (median 36 Gy) followed by a boost (median 18 Gy).
  • Thirty-five children developed evidence of endocrinopathy (Growth hormone deficiency (GHD): 31, hypothyroidism (HPT): 23, precocious puberty (PP): 6, gonadotropin deficiency: 3, ACTH deficiency: 2, and diabetes insipidus: 2).

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  • (PMID = 27962499.001).
  • [ISSN] 1527-7755
  • [Journal-full-title] Journal of clinical oncology : official journal of the American Society of Clinical Oncology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] J. Clin. Oncol.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] United States
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64. Arafat W, Abdelghany A, Awad N: A clinical trial to study the effect of adding cis-retinoic acid during and after conventional treatment for pediatric neuroblastoma patient. J Clin Oncol; 2009 May 20;27(15_suppl):10057
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  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] A clinical trial to study the effect of adding cis-retinoic acid during and after conventional treatment for pediatric neuroblastoma patient.
  • : 10057 Background: Neuroblastoma is predominantly a tumor of early childhood, with two thirds of the cases presenting in children younger than 5 years.
  • Cis-retinoic acid has been used as maintenance therapy for treatment of advanced neuroblastoma after BMT.
  • Patients who received cis-retinoic acid had significantly better 3-year event-free survival than patients receiving no maintenance therapy.
  • The aim of this study is to evaluate the efficacy of cis-retinoic acid when used in combination with conventional chemotherapy in pediatric patient who is newly diagnosed with locally advanced neuroblastoma.
  • METHODS: Seventeen newly diagnosed children with locally advanced neuroblastoma who is candidate to receive chemotherapy were also received cis-retinoic acid starting at a dose of 160 /m<sup>2</sup> day (day 2-15 of chemotherapy) first the 3 patients, 20% dose reduction were allowed if toxicity occurred in first cohort of patient. . Patients were giving the drugs for at least 4 cycles.
  • RT-PCR analysis of several related genes was done from tumor, sample after treatment.
  • Maximum tolerated dose were 130mg/m<sup>2</sup>, response was seen as CR 30%VGR 40, PR 12%, and PD 18%.
  • TOXICITY: Hypercalcemia mucositis, rash, and elevated liver enzymes were the main dose limiting effect of cis-retinoic acid.
  • CONCLUSIONS: Cis-retinoic acid at dose 130mg/m<sup>2</sup> is a well tolerated drug with chemotherapy.

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  • (PMID = 27962453.001).
  • [ISSN] 1527-7755
  • [Journal-full-title] Journal of clinical oncology : official journal of the American Society of Clinical Oncology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] J. Clin. Oncol.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] United States
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65. Musolino A, Ciccolallo L, Panebianco M, Fontana E, Zanoni D, De Lisi V, Sgargi P, Ceci G, Ardizzoni A: Multifactorial CNS relapse susceptibility in HER2-positive breast cancer patients: First results from a population-based registry study. J Clin Oncol; 2009 May 20;27(15_suppl):1117
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  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • METHODS: The aim of this study was to evaluate incidence, survival, and risk factors of CNS metastases in the incident breast cancer population systematically collected by the Tumor Registry of Parma Province over the 4-year period, 2004-2007.
  • CONCLUSIONS: This is the first population-based registry study analyzing CNS metastases in breast cancer in relation to tumor biological features, systemic treatment, and clinical outcome.

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  • (PMID = 27962197.001).
  • [ISSN] 1527-7755
  • [Journal-full-title] Journal of clinical oncology : official journal of the American Society of Clinical Oncology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] J. Clin. Oncol.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] United States
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66. Disis ML, Salazar LG, Coveler A, Waisman J, Higgins D, Childs J, Bates N, Dang Y: Phase I study of infusion of HER2/neu (HER2) specific T cells in patients with advanced-stage HER2 overexpressing cancers who have received a HER2 vaccine. J Clin Oncol; 2009 May 20;27(15_suppl):3000
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  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • Objective tumor regression has been observed in 2 of the 5 treated patients.
  • One other patient has had stable disease after treatment.
  • In patients with tumor regression, the magnitude of HER2-specific T cells in the infused product was 8-fold higher than that in patients without clinical responses.

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  • (PMID = 27962053.001).
  • [ISSN] 1527-7755
  • [Journal-full-title] Journal of clinical oncology : official journal of the American Society of Clinical Oncology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] J. Clin. Oncol.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] United States
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67. Sparano JA, Goldestin LJ, Childs BH, Shak S, Badve S, Baehner FL, Davidson NE, Sledge GW Jr, Gray R, North American Breast Cancer Intergroup: Genotypic characterization of phenotypically defined triple-negative breast cancer. J Clin Oncol; 2009 May 20;27(15_suppl):500
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  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • We evaluated the genotypic features of TNBC compared with hormone receptor (HR)-positive disease, and also evaluated genotypic features associated with recurrence.
  • METHODS: RNA extracted from tumor samples obtained from 764 patients with stage I-III breast cancer was analyzed by RT-PCR for 371 genes.
  • All patients received adjuvant chemotherapy (plus hormonal therapy in HR-positive disease) in trial E2197; HR and HER2 expression were evaluated by immunohistochemistry (IHC) in a central lab (J Clin Oncol 26:2473-2481).
  • Cox proportional hazard models were used to identify differences in gene expression in TNBC versus HR-positive disease, and with recurrence in phenotypically defined (by IHC) TNBC (N=246) and HR-positive (N=465) disease.
  • There was increased expression of genes for which inhibitors are currently being evaluated, including AURKB and CHK1 in TNBC, and IGF1R and RhoC in HR-positive disease.
  • Although GRB7 expression was significantly lower in the TN group, increased expression of GRB7 was the only gene in the TNBC group (but not the HR-positive group) associated with increased recurrence (p=0.04), and did not correlate with nodal status, tumor size, or grade.
  • There were significant differences in gene expression between the TN and HR-positive groups, including genes for which targeted agents are currently being evaluated in the clinic.

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  • (PMID = 27960782.001).
  • [ISSN] 1527-7755
  • [Journal-full-title] Journal of clinical oncology : official journal of the American Society of Clinical Oncology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] J. Clin. Oncol.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] United States
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68. Cheng S, Dietrich M, Finnigan S, Sandler A, Crites J, Ferranti L, Wu A, Dilts D: A sense of urgency: Evaluating the link between clinical trial development time and the accrual performance of CTEP-sponsored studies. J Clin Oncol; 2009 May 20;27(15_suppl):CRA6509
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  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • : CRA6509 The full, final text of this abstract will be available in Part II of the 2009 ASCO Annual Meeting Proceedings, distributed onsite at the Meeting on May 30, 2009, and as a supplement to the June 20, 2009, issue of the Journal of Clinical Oncology.

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  • (PMID = 27960770.001).
  • [ISSN] 1527-7755
  • [Journal-full-title] Journal of clinical oncology : official journal of the American Society of Clinical Oncology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] J. Clin. Oncol.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] United States
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69. Tournigand C, Samson B, Scheithauer W, Louvet C, Andre T, Lledo G, Latreille J, Viret F, Chibaudel B, de Gramont A: mFOLFOX-bevacizumab or XELOX-bevacizumab then bevacizumab (B) alone or with erlotinib (E) in first-line treatment of patients with metastatic colorectal cancer (mCRC): Interim safety analysis of DREAM study. J Clin Oncol; 2009 May 20;27(15_suppl):4077
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  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • To date, 117 pts with a disease control after 6 cy have had a 2<sup>nd</sup> randomisation (M): B alone (7.5 mg/kg q3w, n=56) or B+E 150 mg/d (n=61) until PD.
  • RESULTS: Pts characteristics were: sex: 124M/76F, median age: 62.4 years (26-80), primary tumors: colon 152, rectum 53, synchronous metastases: 150 pts, > 1 metastase site: 115, PS 0/1: 134/66, Alk. Ph.
  • For I, 92 pts in mFOLFOX-B and 93 in XELOX-B were evaluable for toxicity (tox).
  • For M, 56 pts in B and 61 pts in B+E were evaluable.

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  • (PMID = 27961633.001).
  • [ISSN] 1527-7755
  • [Journal-full-title] Journal of clinical oncology : official journal of the American Society of Clinical Oncology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] J. Clin. Oncol.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] United States
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70. Burg ME, Janssen JT, Ottevanger PB, Kerkhofs LG, Valster F, Stouthard JM, Onstenk W, Termorshuizen F, Verweij J: Multicenter randomized phase III trial of 3-weekly paclitaxel/platinum (PC3w) versus weekly paclitaxel/platinum (PCw) induction therapy followed by PC3w maintenance therapy in advanced epithelial ovarian cancer (EOC). J Clin Oncol; 2009 May 20;27(15_suppl):5538
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  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • METHODS: 270 patients (pts) with FIGO stage II-IV, Performance status (PS) 0-2 were randomly assigned to 3 x PC3w (P 175mg/m2 with either cisplatin [Cis] 75mg/m<sup>2</sup> or carboplatin [Car] AUC 6) or 6 x PCw (P 90mg/m2 with either Cis 70mg/m<sup>2</sup> or Car AUC 4, day 1,8,15 and day 29,36,43) followed by up to 6 cycles PC3w in both arms.
  • Pts were stratified for FIGO stage, PS, tumor size and center.
  • RESULTS: 267 pts (134 TC-3w and 133 TCw) were eligible (3 pts wrong tumor type).
  • Pt characteristics were well balanced; median age 58 years, serous 62%, residual disease >1cm 66%, FIGO stage II 7%, III 64%, IV 29%.
  • Median dose-intensity for PC3w was: P 58(47-58) and Cis 25(22.5-25) mg/m<sup>2</sup>/w, Car 2(1.6-2) AUC/w, for PCw: P 60(36-60) and Cis 44.7(30-44.7) mg/m<sup>2</sup>/w and for Car 2.7(1,6-2,7) AUC/w.
  • RR after induction therapy in 176 pts with measurable disease was 72% for TC3w and 74% for TCw (p = 0.68).

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  • (PMID = 27962486.001).
  • [ISSN] 1527-7755
  • [Journal-full-title] Journal of clinical oncology : official journal of the American Society of Clinical Oncology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] J. Clin. Oncol.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] United States
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71. Dumont SN, Aslam MI, McAuliffe JC, Yang D, Nolden LK, Oyedeji CO, Trent JC: CXCR4-CXCL12 axis: Pivotal role as a metastatic mediator in small cell sarcoma. J Clin Oncol; 2009 May 20;27(15_suppl):10569
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  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • RESULTS: CXCR4 was highly expressed on 46 % of human RMS tumor samples.

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  • (PMID = 27963792.001).
  • [ISSN] 1527-7755
  • [Journal-full-title] Journal of clinical oncology : official journal of the American Society of Clinical Oncology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] J. Clin. Oncol.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] United States
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72. Kim HJ, Park E, Lim W, Sei J, Koh B, Son B, Ahn S: Characteristics of bone mineral density at the time of diagnosis in postmenopausal breast cancer patients. J Clin Oncol; 2009 May 20;27(15_suppl):e22187
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  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • Patients with higher BMD at lumbar spine were found to have low grade disease (p<0.005).
  • The patients with hormone receptor positive breast tumor showed higher BMD at lumbar spine and lower serum 25(OH)D than hormone receptor negative tumor.

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  • (PMID = 27963607.001).
  • [ISSN] 1527-7755
  • [Journal-full-title] Journal of clinical oncology : official journal of the American Society of Clinical Oncology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] J. Clin. Oncol.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] United States
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73. Billan S, Nasrallah H, Abdah-Bortnyak R, Kuten A: Analysis and utility of pretreatment and posttreatment total body iodine-131 scans in patients with thyroid carcinoma. J Clin Oncol; 2009 May 20;27(15_suppl):e17031
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  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • Three patients had lung and mediastinal uptake in known sites of metastatic disease.
  • Variables found to correlate significantly with additional uptake on the post-I131 therapy total body scintigraphies were tumor size >4cm, lymph-node involvement and extracapsular extension.

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  • (PMID = 27961807.001).
  • [ISSN] 1527-7755
  • [Journal-full-title] Journal of clinical oncology : official journal of the American Society of Clinical Oncology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] J. Clin. Oncol.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] United States
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74. Karvinen K, DuBose KD, Allison RR: Use of physical activity as a health tool for cancer patients and oncologists. J Clin Oncol; 2009 May 20;27(15_suppl):9634
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  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • Potential predictors of physical activity promotion (i.e., age, ethnicity, number of years practicing, tumor types treated and own physical activity participation) were tested using univariate statistics.

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  • (PMID = 27963928.001).
  • [ISSN] 1527-7755
  • [Journal-full-title] Journal of clinical oncology : official journal of the American Society of Clinical Oncology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] J. Clin. Oncol.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] United States
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75. Stephenson AJ, Klein EA, Kattan MW, Han M, Partin AW, Walsh PC, Trock BJ, Wood DP, Eggener SE, Eastham JA, Scardino PT: Predicting the long-term risk of prostate cancer-specific mortality after radical prostatectomy. J Clin Oncol; 2009 May 20;27(15_suppl):5007
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  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • : 5007 Background: Nomograms that predict prostate-specific antigen (PSA) defined biochemical recurrence (BCR) of prostate cancer after radical prostatectomy are the most widely used prediction tools in oncology for treatment decision making and counseling.

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  • (PMID = 27962891.001).
  • [ISSN] 1527-7755
  • [Journal-full-title] Journal of clinical oncology : official journal of the American Society of Clinical Oncology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] J. Clin. Oncol.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] United States
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76. Yamamoto D, Yoshida H, Iwase S, Odagiri H, Kitamura K: TS-1 in patients with capecitabine-resistant breast cancer. J Clin Oncol; 2009 May 20;27(15_suppl):1103
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  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • Resistance to capecitabine was defined as either progression of disease during treatment, failure to achieve regression of disease after at least four courses, or rapid recurrence after completion of therapy.
  • Ten pts (25 %) achieved a partial response, 12 patients (30 %) patients had stable disease, and 18 (45 %) progressive disease.
  • The median time to disease progression was 26.6 weeks.
  • 7 pts experienced serious TS-1- related gastrointestinal disorder requiring dose modifications in 3 pts and treatment discontinuation in 4 pt.
  • Further, interestingly, 6 of the 40 patients (15.0%) who received TS-1 did hand-foot syndrome (HFS), although 20 of the 40 patients (50.0%) who had received capecitabine, developed HFS.
  • CONCLUSIONS: This study confirms that TS-1 achieves a high tumor control rate in pretreated MBC pts and is active in patients with capecitabine-resistant breast cancer.
  • TS-1 should be considered the reference treatment in this setting based on consistently high efficacy and good tolerability.

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  • (PMID = 27962169.001).
  • [ISSN] 1527-7755
  • [Journal-full-title] Journal of clinical oncology : official journal of the American Society of Clinical Oncology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] J. Clin. Oncol.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] United States
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77. Roth AD, Tejpar S, Yan P, Fiocca R, Dietrich D, Delorenzi M, Labianca R, Cunningham D, Van Cutsem E, Bosman F: Stage-specific prognostic value of molecular markers in colon cancer: Results of the translational study on the PETACC 3-EORTC 40993-SAKK 60-00 trial. J Clin Oncol; 2009 May 20;27(15_suppl):4002
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  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • METHODS: 1,564 formalin fixed paraffin embedded tissue blocks were prospectively collected and DNA from normal and tumor tissue was extracted after macrodissection.
  • Multivariate analysis including markers, T stage, N stage (for SIII), Tu grade, age <60, sex, treatment arm, and Tu site found T stage (p=0.0001) and MSI (p=0.02) as independently significant clinical predictors in SII; N stage (p<0.0001), T stage (p<0.0001), SMAD4 (p<0.0001) and P53 (p=0.01) in SIII.
  • The possibility that the stages represent different diseases, rather than sequential steps in the evolution of a single disease, needs to be considered.

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  • (PMID = 27961825.001).
  • [ISSN] 1527-7755
  • [Journal-full-title] Journal of clinical oncology : official journal of the American Society of Clinical Oncology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] J. Clin. Oncol.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] United States
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78. Basar AA, Whittome J: CPORT: Effective partnership working to optimize chemotherapy capacity in the UK. J Clin Oncol; 2009 May 20;27(15_suppl):e20687
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  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • METHODS: CPORT stands for "Chemotherapy-Planning Oncology Resource Tool".
  • CONCLUSIONS: This model represents a successful new form of partnership working between the NHS and the industry to increase capacity within chemotherapy services.

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  • (PMID = 27961785.001).
  • [ISSN] 1527-7755
  • [Journal-full-title] Journal of clinical oncology : official journal of the American Society of Clinical Oncology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] J. Clin. Oncol.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] United States
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79. Netikova I, Sedlackova E, Konopasek B, Petruzelka L: Therapy of palmar-plantar erythrodysesthesia after continual fluoropyrimidin administration with 10% uridin ointment. J Clin Oncol; 2009 May 20;27(15_suppl):e20690
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  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • In many countries, including the Czech Republic, uridin is not registered for routine medical treatment.
  • Number of chemotherapy cycles, a grade of HFS and it´s site, time of uridin local administration and a grade of HFS after treatment, were evaluted.
  • The reason was a change of therapy after tumor progresion or change of hospital.

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  • (PMID = 27961759.001).
  • [ISSN] 1527-7755
  • [Journal-full-title] Journal of clinical oncology : official journal of the American Society of Clinical Oncology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] J. Clin. Oncol.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] United States
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80. Ghai V, Harvey HA, Abbi KK, Barochia A, Bhardwaj C, Demers LM: Significance of CA 27.29 (MUC 1 glycoprotein) levels in patients with breast cancer. J Clin Oncol; 2009 May 20;27(15_suppl):e11579
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  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • We wanted to assess the significance of measuring the tumor marker (CA 27.29 levels) to monitor the clinical progress of breast cancer.
  • Patient CA 27.29 levels were correlated with clinical progression of the disease (diagnostic imaging and history and physical examinations).
  • RESULTS: Out of 330 patients with Stage I, II, and III after treatment with adjuvant therapy, 316 had no evidence of disease (NED) and had normal levels(<38) of CA 27.29.
  • Out of the14 patients with clinical evidence of disease recurrence, 3 had persistently elevated levels.
  • Of the 62 patients with stage IV breast cancer following cheomotherapy, 29 patients had clinical progression of disease with 20 (69%) patients showing increasing levels.
  • Out of the 33 patients with no evidence of progression of disease only 4(12%) had increasing levels.
  • However, increasing levels of CA27.29 in metastatic disease correlate well with clinical progression of the disease.
  • A large multicenter prospective study is warranted to further assess the role of CA 27.29 for disease monitoring in locally advanced and metastatic breast cancer.

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  • (PMID = 27964161.001).
  • [ISSN] 1527-7755
  • [Journal-full-title] Journal of clinical oncology : official journal of the American Society of Clinical Oncology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] J. Clin. Oncol.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] United States
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81. Darling G, Maziak D, Inculet R, Gulenchyn K, Driedger A, Ung Y, Miller J, Gu C, Evans W, Levine M: PET-CT compared to invasive mediastinal staging in non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). J Clin Oncol; 2009 May 20;27(15_suppl):7575
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  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] PET-CT compared to invasive mediastinal staging in non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC).
  • : 7575 Background: In patients with NSCLC, preoperative staging tests including mediastinoscopy (M) are important in defining which patients are surgical candidates.
  • <sup>18</sup>FDG PET-CT is useful in identifying patients with mediastinal disease not evident by CT.
  • METHODS: In this analysis, we determined the accuracy of PET-CT in mediastinal staging compared to invasive surgical staging either by M alone or by M and T.
  • Of 21 patients with a positive PET-CT, 7 did not have tumor.
  • If PET-CT is negative in the mediastinum, the likelihood of occult metastatic disease in the mediastinum is very low and invasive staging may not be required depending on the clinical context.

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  • (PMID = 27963383.001).
  • [ISSN] 1527-7755
  • [Journal-full-title] Journal of clinical oncology : official journal of the American Society of Clinical Oncology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] J. Clin. Oncol.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] United States
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82. Kobayashi K, Tsuji A, Hata Y, Morita S, Horimi T: Retrospective study of the patients with unresectable gastric cancer (UNGC) who underwent a gastrectomy after receiving S-1 or S-1 combination chemotherapy (S-1+α). J Clin Oncol; 2009 May 20;27(15_suppl):e15668
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  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • Today in Japan, S- 1+αincluding S+DTX, S+CPT-11 and S+PTX are the mainstay treatments for ARGC.
  • There are some case reports of pts with UNGC who were operated on due to the good anti-tumor effect of S-1+α, however, no consensus for performing a gastrectomy after chemotherapy has yet been reached.
  • Treatment regimens; S:13, S+DTX:3, and S+P:9.
  • RR was 56% (PR:14, SD:9, PD:2).
  • The features were DOWN (M/F=5/3/65 yrs/PR:8/L:6, D:0, N:4, P:3) and PAL (M/F=4/0/57 yrs/SD:4/L:1, D:3, N:1 P:1).
  • In addition, 8 pts experienced histological changes, in particular, one pt achieved Grade 3 (No viable tumor cells were found.).
  • CONCLUSIONS: The findings of this study suggest that the above described chemotherapeutic regimen combined with a second-look gastrectomy might therefore be a new potentially effective strategy for the treatment of UNGC.

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  • (PMID = 27962753.001).
  • [ISSN] 1527-7755
  • [Journal-full-title] Journal of clinical oncology : official journal of the American Society of Clinical Oncology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] J. Clin. Oncol.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] United States
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83. Villaflor VM, Kanteti R, Watson SM, Karrison T, Vokes EE, Salgia R: Response and survival in African American (AA) patients (pts) with non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) treated with erlotinib (E). J Clin Oncol; 2009 May 20;27(15_suppl):e19006
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  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] Response and survival in African American (AA) patients (pts) with non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) treated with erlotinib (E).
  • EGFR activating mutations correlate with adenocarcinoma histology, non-smoking history, female gender, and Asian ethnicity.
  • We will correlate these data with EGFR mutation and c-Met expression/mutations/amplifications for markers of NSCLC.
  • We then retrospectively collected demographic data (age, race, sex, and tobacco history), tumor histology, response rates, survival data and duration of response from AA pts treated with E as single agent.
  • Overall response rate of 13.6% (6-PR, 16-SD, 18-progessive disease, and 4 patients lost to follow up).
  • EGFR mutations and c-Met analysis will be provided by ASCO meeting in May 2009.

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  • (PMID = 27962520.001).
  • [ISSN] 1527-7755
  • [Journal-full-title] Journal of clinical oncology : official journal of the American Society of Clinical Oncology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] J. Clin. Oncol.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] United States
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84. Ma HY, Newman E, Ryan T, Miller G, Sarpel U, Pachter HL, Cohen DJ, Choi H, Goldberg JD, Hochster HS: Neoadjuvant therapy of gastric cancer with cetuximab added to both irinotecan and cisplatin, followed by surgical resection and adjuvant chemoradiation. J Clin Oncol; 2009 May 20;27(15_suppl):e15552
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  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • : e15552 Background: We previously demonstrated the efficacy of irinotecan (CPT) and cisplatin (Cis) combination therapy as neoadjuvant therapy for locally advanced gastric cancer [Newman E et al.
  • Neoadjuvant therapy consisted of Cis 25mg/m<sup>2</sup> + CPT 75mg/m<sup>2</sup> on d1,8 q21d x 4, C 400mg/m<sup>2</sup> on d1, then 250mg/m<sup>2</sup> qwk.
  • 14 underwent R0 gastrectomy (see table); 8 were downstaged, 2 had stable disease, 4 were upstaged compared to the preoperative EUS.
  • Among the 18 pts who completed neoadjuvant therapy, 5 died of disease, 1 is alive with disease, 12 remain NED with median f/u of 11.6mos (4.1-27.7mos).
  • CONCLUSIONS: The addition of C to CPT/Cis as neoadjuvant therapy and to postoperative adjuvant CRT is well tolerated.
  • The regimen induces a favorable pathologic response on the primary tumor.

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  • (PMID = 27962343.001).
  • [ISSN] 1527-7755
  • [Journal-full-title] Journal of clinical oncology : official journal of the American Society of Clinical Oncology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] J. Clin. Oncol.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] United States
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85. Kingsley E, Richards D, Garbo L, Gersh R, Robbins G, Leopold L, Brill J, Di Bella N: An open-label, multicenter, phase II study of AT-101 in combination with rituximab (R) in patients with untreated, grade 1-2, follicular non-Hodgkin's lymphoma (FL). J Clin Oncol; 2009 May 20;27(15_suppl):8582
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  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] An open-label, multicenter, phase II study of AT-101 in combination with rituximab (R) in patients with untreated, grade 1-2, follicular non-Hodgkin's lymphoma (FL).
  • It is active as a single agent and in combination with R in NHL tumor models.
  • RESULTS: 23 pts enrolled: median age 64 yrs; FLIPI 0-5: 0%/17%/65%/13%/4%; Grade 1/2: 61%/39%; bulky disease (>5cm<sup>3</sup>): 35%; stage: 1-4 4%/4%/30%/61%; bone marrow + 48%.

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  • (PMID = 27962265.001).
  • [ISSN] 1527-7755
  • [Journal-full-title] Journal of clinical oncology : official journal of the American Society of Clinical Oncology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] J. Clin. Oncol.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] United States
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86. Kerr D, Gray R, Quirke P, Watson D, Yothers G, Lavery IC, Lee M, O'Connell MJ, Shak S, Wolmark N, Genomic Health and QUASAR Colon Teams: A quantitative multigene RT-PCR assay for prediction of recurrence in stage II colon cancer: Selection of the genes in four large studies and results of the independent, prospectively designed QUASAR validation study. J Clin Oncol; 2009 May 20;27(15_suppl):4000
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  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • : 4000 Background: New clinical tools are needed to improve risk assessment and treatment decisions in stage II colon cancer.
  • Four development studies [Surgery (Sx) alone: NSABP C-01/C-02 (n=270) and CCF study (n=765); Sx+5FU/LV: NSABP C-04 (n=308) and C-06 (n=508)] were performed to select the genes for prediction of recurrence and 5FU/LV benefit.
  • Recurrence-free interval (RFI), disease-free survival (DFS), and overall survival (OS) were analyzed using Cox regression.
  • Multivariate analysis, in the context of stage, grade, nodes examined, and MSI status, yielded 18 genes (7 prognostic genes, 6 predictive genes, 5 reference genes) and separate prognostic recurrence score (RS) and predictive treatment score (TS) algorithms.
  • In the QUASAR validation study, tumor blocks were collected for 68% of pts; 1,490 pts with blocks had stage II colon cancer and RT-PCR was successful in 1,436 eligible pts (711 Sx, 725 Sx+5FU/LV).

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  • (PMID = 27961827.001).
  • [ISSN] 1527-7755
  • [Journal-full-title] Journal of clinical oncology : official journal of the American Society of Clinical Oncology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] J. Clin. Oncol.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] United States
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87. Segal NH, Reidy-Lagunes D, Capanu M, Kemeny N, Chung K, Kelsen D, Hollywood E, Goodman-Davis N, Saltz LB: Phase II study of bevacizumab in combination with cetuximab plus irinotecan in irinotecan-refractory colorectal cancer (CRC) patients who have progressed on a bevacizumab-containing regimen (The BOND 2.5 Study). J Clin Oncol; 2009 May 20;27(15_suppl):4087
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  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • : 4087 Background: We previously showed that adding bevacizumab (bev) to cetuximab (cetux) plus irinotecan (IRI) in bev-naïve, IRI-refractory CRC patients is feasible, and yielded a favorable response rate and time to tumor progression (TTP) compared with historical controls (Saltz: JCO, 2007).
  • At a median follow up of 32 months (range 21-32 months) in 33 evaluable patients, we observed 3 (9%) partial responses and 11 (33%) patients with stable disease for > 4 months.
  • Ongoing randomized trials, including SWOG 0600, will be needed to definitively determine the contribution of continued use of bev after progression on a bev-containing regimen.

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  • (PMID = 27961665.001).
  • [ISSN] 1527-7755
  • [Journal-full-title] Journal of clinical oncology : official journal of the American Society of Clinical Oncology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] J. Clin. Oncol.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] United States
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88. Khosravi-Shahi P, Izarzugaza Peron Y, Perez-Manga G: Low pathologic complete response (pCR) rate to neoadjuvant chemotherapy in invasive lobular carcinoma of breast: Analysis of subgroup of four phase II trials. J Clin Oncol; 2009 May 20;27(15_suppl):601
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  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • METHODS: Patients (p) with histologically confirmed lobular carcinoma (LC), including in four phase II trials (AT, ATX, TXH, and BTX) conducted in our center, were eligible.
  • Secondary endpoints were: clinical response rate (CRR), breast conservative surgery rate (BCSR), pathologic tumoral size (pTS), disease-free survival (DFS), and overall survival (OS).
  • RESULTS: A total of 185 ps including in the four trials were evaluated.
  • Sixteen ps had LC (16/185 = 8.65%): median age = 50 y (38-66); premenopausal = 56.2%; left breast = 56.2%; median clinical (c) tumor size = 5 cm (3-6); stage:IIA = 6.7%; IIB = 26.7%; IIIA = 33.3%; IIIB = 33.3%; T:cT3 = 50%; cT4 = 28.6%; cN+ = 71.4% (median pN = 2 [0-32]); grade: G2 = 60%, G3 = 40%; ER+ = 78.6%; PgR+ = 64.3%; HER-2+ = 6.25%; phenotype by IHC: Luminal (HR+/HER-2-) = 75% (12/16); Luminal/HER-2+ (HR+/HER-2+) = 6.25%; triple negative (3/16) = 18.75%; p53+ = 25%; EGFR negative = 90%; median Ki-67 = 20% (5-70); adjuvant trastuzumab (H) = 6.25%; RT = 60%, median dose = 50Gy; Ht = 78.6% (tamoxifen = 55%; AI = 45%); type of PCT: docetaxel (T), capecitabine (X), and H (TXH) = 1p (6.2%); doxorubicin (A), T, and X (ATX) = 5 ps (31.2%); bevacizumab, T, and X (BTX) = 5 ps (31.2%); AT = 5 ps (31.2%); median of 5 cycles (2-6).

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  • (PMID = 27961466.001).
  • [ISSN] 1527-7755
  • [Journal-full-title] Journal of clinical oncology : official journal of the American Society of Clinical Oncology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] J. Clin. Oncol.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] United States
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89. Bastos BR, Diamond J, Hansen R, Gustafson D, Arnott J, Bray M, Sidor C, Messersmith W, Shapiro G: An open-label, dose escalation, safety, and pharmacokinetic study of ENMD-2076 administered orally to patients with advanced cancer. J Clin Oncol; 2009 May 20;27(15_suppl):3520
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  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • : 3520 Background: ENMD-2076, a novel, orally-active antimitotic and antiangiogenic molecule inhibits Aurora A as well as tyrosine kinases that drive tumor vascularization, including VEGFR2 (KDR), PDGFR and the FGF receptors.
  • Following drug interruption, the pt restarted at 30 mg/m<sup>2</sup>/d and continued for 4 additional cycles before being removed for progressive disease.
  • Noncompartmental PK analysis of the first two dose levels shows that the plasma concentration of ENMD-981693 (the active free base of ENMD-2076) is dose- linear, as reflected in AUC and C<sub>max</sub>.
  • Four ovarian cancer and 2 colon cancer pts have achieved decreases ranging from 11-61% in either CA125 or CEA, respectively (4 are associated with stable disease at Cycle 2 by modified RECIST criteria).

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  • (PMID = 27961327.001).
  • [ISSN] 1527-7755
  • [Journal-full-title] Journal of clinical oncology : official journal of the American Society of Clinical Oncology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] J. Clin. Oncol.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] United States
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90. Bartsch R, Wenzel C, Pluschnig U, Dubsky P, Gampenrieder SP, Rudas M, Mader R, Gnant M, Zielinski CC, Steger GG: Predicting response to second-line trastuzumab-based therapy in patients (pts) with HER2-positive advanced breast cancer (ABC). J Clin Oncol; 2009 May 20;27(15_suppl):1090
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  • Finding the optimal treatment approach therefore is pertinent.
  • Response rate (RR; CR+PR), clinical benefit rate (CBR; CR+PR+SD >6 months), time to progression (TTP), overall survival (OS), and cardiac toxicity were recorded.
  • In order to identify factors associated with TTP, the following variables were included in a Cox regression model: age (≤65 y/>65 y), initial tumor stage (<IV/IV), grading, ductal/lobular carcinoma, endocrine receptor status, prior non T-containing palliative chemotherapy, metastatic sites (visceral/non-visceral only), and clinical benefit (CB) from T-based first-line therapy.

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  • (PMID = 27961235.001).
  • [ISSN] 1527-7755
  • [Journal-full-title] Journal of clinical oncology : official journal of the American Society of Clinical Oncology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] J. Clin. Oncol.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] United States
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91. Toumpanakis C, Quigley A, Srirajaskanthan R, Marelli L, Singhrao T, Meyer T, Buscombe J, Caplin ME: 90-Yttrium-DOTA-octreotate for the treatment of advanced neuroendocrine tumors. J Clin Oncol; 2009 May 20;27(15_suppl):4594
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  • [Title] 90-Yttrium-DOTA-octreotate for the treatment of advanced neuroendocrine tumors.
  • : 4594 Background: The expression of somatostatin receptors (SSTR) on Neuroendocrine Tumors (NETs) has led not only to tumour visualization utilizing SSTR scintigraphy, but also to the development of receptor-targeted radionuclide therapy.
  • Isotopes such as 111-Indium, 90-Yttrium and 177-Lutetium are linked to somatostatin analogues and then internalized by tumour cells.
  • In all patients, the tumours had shown good uptake either in the OctreoScan or in the Ga-68 octreotate PET scan.
  • 29/89 patients included a cycle of intra-arterial therapy with mean dose/cycle 2090 MBq for large volume liver disease.
  • RESULTS: In all patients the post treatment scintigraphy demonstrated good uptake and localization by the tumors.
  • Utilizing RECIST criteria, 50/89 (56%) had disease stabilization (SD) of previously progressive disease and 7 (8%) had partial response (PR).
  • 31/89 (35%) had continued tumor progression.
  • The SD/PR (n=57) group had sustained response for median 17.2 months.
  • CONCLUSIONS: 90Y-DOTA-octreotate is a well-tolerated and safe treatment for patients with progressive neuroendocrine tumors.

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  • (PMID = 27963114.001).
  • [ISSN] 1527-7755
  • [Journal-full-title] Journal of clinical oncology : official journal of the American Society of Clinical Oncology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] J. Clin. Oncol.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] United States
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92. Piulats JM Sr, Nadal M, Martinez-Iniesta M, Puertas S, Gonzalez S, Vidal A, Condom E, Germa-Lluch J, Garcia Del Muro X, Villanueva A: Nude mice model of primary human nonseminoma germ cell tumors to study biology and resistance to cisplatin treatment. J Clin Oncol; 2009 May 20;27(15_suppl):e16143
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  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] Nude mice model of primary human nonseminoma germ cell tumors to study biology and resistance to cisplatin treatment.
  • : e16143 Testicular germ cell tumors (TGCTs) are the most common malignancy in young men.
  • Recently, our group has reported the development of a model of human nonseminoma (NSE) after orthotopic nude mice implantation (Piulats et al, Amer Assoc Cancer Res. 2006).
  • Pure and mix NSE anatomies were represented and they reproduce the main histological, genetic and epigenetic characteristics of paired primary tumors.
  • Xenografts mimic distal dissemination patterns and cisplatin (CDDP) tumor behavior responses.
  • This model has been useful for the study of antiangiogenic therapies (Piulats et al, ASCO.
  • We have generated in vivo five tumors showing increased resistance to CDDP by exposition to repetitive cycles and increasing the dose applied through different passages (1 yolk-sac; 1 choriocarcinoma; 2 embrional carcinoma; 1 mix tumor).
  • A shortness time elipse between pasajes was observed for each tumor through CDDP treatments.
  • To confirm increasin resistance, a parallel assay of chemotherapy response was performed between nontreated and CDDP resistant tumors.
  • Whole genome analysis of tour xenografted tumors and their paired CDDP resistant tumor (#3 and #5 passage) were analyzed by CGH NimbeGen arrays using 60 Kb average windows.
  • Few differential genomic changes were identified some of them were consistent across resistant tumors including gain of 9q21.11-9q33.3, 15q23-15q24.1, and 15q26.3 regions and loss of Xp22.33.
  • In one tumour showing strong CDDP resistance compared with its sensitive counterpart it occur in absence of new genomic changes.
  • No changes in the MSI or mutational TP53 status were observed in resisant tumors.
  • Our data suggest that acquisition of tumor resistance to CDDP in TGCTs may proably depend of a combination of different mechanisms, including cromosomal imbalances.

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  • (PMID = 27963427.001).
  • [ISSN] 1527-7755
  • [Journal-full-title] Journal of clinical oncology : official journal of the American Society of Clinical Oncology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] J. Clin. Oncol.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] United States
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93. Serizawa T, Saeki N, Higuchi Y, Ono J, Matsuda S, Sato M, Yanagisawa M, Iuchi T, Nagano O, Yamaura A: Diagnostic value of thallium-201 chloride single-photon emission computerized tomography in differentiating tumor recurrence from radiation injury after gamma knife surgery for metastatic brain tumors. J Neurosurg; 2005 Jan;102(s_supplement):266-271
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  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] Diagnostic value of thallium-201 chloride single-photon emission computerized tomography in differentiating tumor recurrence from radiation injury after gamma knife surgery for metastatic brain tumors.
  • OBJECT: The authors assessed the diagnostic value of <sup>201</sup>Tl Cl single-photon emission computerized tomography (SPECT), performed after gamma knife surgery (GKS) for metastatic brain tumors in differentiating tumor recurrence from radiation injury.
  • METHODS: Of 6503 metastatic brain tumors treated with GKS, <sup>201</sup>Tl SPECT was required in 72 to differentiate between tumor recurrence and radiation injury.
  • When the Tl index was greater than 5, the lesion was diagnosed as a tumor recurrence.
  • The sensitivity of the method was 91%; thus <sup>201</sup>Tl SPECT is effective for differentiating between tumor recurrence and radiation injury in metastatic brain tumors treated with GKS.
  • CONCLUSIONS: Used with critical insight <sup>201</sup>Tl Cl SPECT can be useful in distinguishing between tumor regrowth and radiation necrosis in patients with cerebral metastases.

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  • (PMID = 28306470.001).
  • [ISSN] 1933-0693
  • [Journal-full-title] Journal of neurosurgery
  • [ISO-abbreviation] J. Neurosurg.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] United States
  • [Keywords] NOTNLM ; gamma knife surgery / metastatic brain tumor / radiation injury / single-photon emission computerized tomography / thallium-201 / tumor recurrence
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94. Lujan M, Cardona AF, Yepes A, Carrasco-Chaumel E, Reveiz L, Otero JM: Myelophthisis in solid tumors: Old aspects, new concepts (ONCOLGroup study). J Clin Oncol; 2009 May 20;27(15_suppl):e20672
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  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] Myelophthisis in solid tumors: Old aspects, new concepts (ONCOLGroup study).
  • METHODS: This retrospective study included 89 patients (pts) with solid tumors and myelophtisis that had been treated from 1991 to 2006 in a single reference center in Bogotá.
  • Twenty-seven pts (30%) had breast cancer, pathology followed by primary unknown tumours (21%), rabdomiosarcoma (10%), prostate adenocarcinoma (10%), gastric carcinoma (7%) and others (22%).
  • Nine episodes of febrile neutropenia were found; median overall survival (OS) following the diagnosis of neoplasia and myelophtisis were 13.8 months and 2.2 months respectively.
  • The factors related to lower survival rate were the presence of Hb ≤8.5 gr/dl (HR: 0,54, CI95% 0,32-0,95; p = 0.04), >3 metastasis sites (HR: 0,67, CI95% 0,45-0,92; p = 0.03), visceral disease (HR: 0,72, CI95% 0,66-0,89; p = 0.04) and febrile neutropenia caused by chemotherapy (HR: 0,52, CI95% 0,37-0,60; p = 0.02).
  • CONCLUSIONS: Myelophtisis is a serious condition modifying the OS of patients having solid tumours.

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  • (PMID = 27961689.001).
  • [ISSN] 1527-7755
  • [Journal-full-title] Journal of clinical oncology : official journal of the American Society of Clinical Oncology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] J. Clin. Oncol.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] United States
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95. Widemann BC, Fox E, Adamson PC, Baruchel S, Kim A, Ingle AM, Bender JG, Stempak D, Balis FM, Blaney SM: Phase I study of sorafenib in children with refractory solid tumors: A Children's Oncology Group Phase I Consortium trial. J Clin Oncol; 2009 May 20;27(15_suppl):10012
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  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] Phase I study of sorafenib in children with refractory solid tumors: A Children's Oncology Group Phase I Consortium trial.
  • We performed a phase I trial to determine the toxicities, maximum tolerated dose (MTD), pharmacokinetics (PK), and pharmacodynamics (PD) of sorafenib in children with refractory solid tumors.
  • RESULTS: 34 eligible pts [16M, median age 14.6 yrs, (range, 5-21)] with osteosarcoma (n = 8), rhabdomyosarcoma (n = 3), other sarcomas (n = 13), hepatoblastoma (n = 3), or other solid tumors (n = 7) received 1-22 cycles (median 2).
  • Gr 3 DLTs occurred in 1/6 pts (lipase) at 150 mg/m<sup>2</sup> and 2/2 pts (hyponatremia, hand-foot syndrome) at 250 mg/m<sup>2</sup>.
  • No objective responses were observed, but 2 pts had tumor shrinkage.
  • Plasma VEGFR (n = 13) decreased from 9.9±1.6 ng/mL at baseline to 8.3±1.7 ng/mL by d 28 (p < 0.001).
  • CONCLUSIONS: The MTD of sorafenib in children with solid tumors is 200 mg/m<sup>2</sup>, similar to the adult recommended dose (400 mg).

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  • (PMID = 27962524.001).
  • [ISSN] 1527-7755
  • [Journal-full-title] Journal of clinical oncology : official journal of the American Society of Clinical Oncology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] J. Clin. Oncol.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] United States
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96. Chekerov R, Coumbos A, Sehouli J, Schaedel D, Oskay-Oezcelik G, Lichtenegger W, Kuehn W: Current management of borderline ovarian tumors: A multicenter survey of 323 clinics in Germany, on behalf of the North-Eastern German Society of Gynecological Oncology (NOGGO). J Clin Oncol; 2009 May 20;27(15_suppl):e16568
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  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] Current management of borderline ovarian tumors: A multicenter survey of 323 clinics in Germany, on behalf of the North-Eastern German Society of Gynecological Oncology (NOGGO).
  • : e16568 Background: The aim of this survey was to analyze the standard of care in diagnostic, surgery, chemotherapy and aftercare management of patients with Borderline tumor of the ovary (BOT) in Germany.
  • 93.2% of the gynecological departments used additional preoperative diagnostic procedures to the classical bimanual examination and vaginal ultrasound in a case of unclear ovarian tumor: CA-125 or CEA detection (95%), CT-scan (76%), Doppler ultrasound (66%), MRI (36%), or PET-CT (1.7%) techniques.
  • Chemotherapy was the second therapy option (64%) after surgery (97%) for BOT, mostly favored in "high-risk" patients with tumor residual, micro invasion or invasive implants.
  • CONCLUSIONS: These data demonstrate a high clinical unsureness in the clinical management of borderline tumors of the ovary.

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  • (PMID = 27961520.001).
  • [ISSN] 1527-7755
  • [Journal-full-title] Journal of clinical oncology : official journal of the American Society of Clinical Oncology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] J. Clin. Oncol.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] United States
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97. Carden CP, Frentzas S, Langham M, Casamayor I, Stephens AW, Poondru S, Wheaton J, Lippman SM, Kaye SB, Kim ES: Preliminary activity in adrenocortical tumor (ACC) in phase I dose escalation study of intermittent oral dosing of OSI-906, a small-molecule insulin-like growth factor-1 receptor (IGF-1R) tyrosine kinase inhibitor in patients with advanced solid tumors. J Clin Oncol; 2009 May 20;27(15_suppl):3544
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  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] Preliminary activity in adrenocortical tumor (ACC) in phase I dose escalation study of intermittent oral dosing of OSI-906, a small-molecule insulin-like growth factor-1 receptor (IGF-1R) tyrosine kinase inhibitor in patients with advanced solid tumors.
  • IGF-1R blockade increases apoptosis and reduces tumor growth in preclinical models.
  • METHODS: Patients (pt) with advanced solid tumours were enrolled to determine safety, tolerability, maximum tolerated dose, pharmacokinetics (PK), pharmacodynamics (PD) and preliminary anti-tumor activity.

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  • (PMID = 27961354.001).
  • [ISSN] 1527-7755
  • [Journal-full-title] Journal of clinical oncology : official journal of the American Society of Clinical Oncology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] J. Clin. Oncol.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] United States
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98. Arnold R, Müller H, Schade-Brittinger C, Rinke A, Klose K, Barth P, Wied M, Mayer C, Aminossadati B, PROMID Study Group: Placebo-controlled, double-blind, prospective, randomized study of the effect of octreotide LAR in the control of tumor growth in patients with metastatic neuroendocrine midgut tumors: A report from the PROMID study group. J Clin Oncol; 2009 May 20;27(15_suppl):4508
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  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] Placebo-controlled, double-blind, prospective, randomized study of the effect of octreotide LAR in the control of tumor growth in patients with metastatic neuroendocrine midgut tumors: A report from the PROMID study group.
  • : 4508 Background: Octreotide is currently used for the control of symptoms in patients with gastroenteropancreatic neuroendocrine tumors (NETs).
  • However, the ability of long-acting somatostatin analogues to control the growth of well-differentiated metastatic NETs is a matter of debate.
  • METHODS: Treatment-naïve patients with histologically confirmed locally inoperable or metastasized well-differentiated NETs and a Karnofsky index >60 were randomized to receive either octreotide LAR 30 mg/month (mo) or placebo for 18 mos, or until tumor progression or death.
  • The primary endpoint was median time to tumor progression.
  • Secondary endpoints included objective tumor response rate (WHO criteria), measured every 3 mos, as well as symptom control and overall survival.
  • RESULTS: Eighty-five patients (n=43 octreotide LAR; n=42 placebo) have been enrolled to date and data from 67 patients with tumor progressions and 16 deaths (n=7 octreotide LAR; n=9 placebo) are included here.
  • Median time to tumor progression in the octreotide LAR and placebo groups were 14.3 mos and 6 mos, respectively (HR: 0.34; 95% CI: 0.20-0.59; P=0.000072).
  • After 6 mos of treatment, stable disease was seen in 67% and 37.2% of patients treated with octreotide LAR and placebo, respectively.
  • CONCLUSIONS: Octreotide LAR significantly lengthens median time to tumor progression compared with placebo in patients with metastatic NETs of the midgut.
  • Patients treated with octreotide LAR had a 66% risk reduction of tumor progression compared with patients receiving placebo.
  • Octreotide LAR demonstrates substantial tumor control and shows a more favorable antiproliferative response than placebo as two-thirds of patients treated with octreotide LAR achieved stable disease at 6 mos.

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  • (PMID = 27962687.001).
  • [ISSN] 1527-7755
  • [Journal-full-title] Journal of clinical oncology : official journal of the American Society of Clinical Oncology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] J. Clin. Oncol.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] United States
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99. Hennessy B, Timms K, Carey MS, Gutin A, Broaddus R, Gonzalez-Angulo A, Lanchbury J, Lu K, Mills GB: Somatic BRCA status in ovarian tumors. J Clin Oncol; 2009 May 20;27(15_suppl):5528
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  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] Somatic BRCA status in ovarian tumors.
  • It is important to know whether somatic (non-germline) BRCA changes are present in ovarian tumors, given the predicted sensitivity of BRCA mutation-carrying tumors to PARP inhibitors and other DNA damaging agents.
  • However, a large cohort of ovarian tumor tissues has not been studied to determine the frequency of BRCA deficiency due to additional somatic changes.
  • In 112 tumors, we also performed gene expression analysis and copy number arrays with ultradense probe tiling throughout both BRCA genes.
  • RESULTS: For BRCA1, 31 tumors (13.2%) harbored mutations: 23 known deleterious mutations, 1 suspected deleterious mutation, 3 novel indels, 1 novel mis-sense and 3 novel nonsense mutations.
  • For BRCA2, 12/178 sequenced tumors (6.7%) harbored mutations: 8 known deleterious mutations, 1 suspected deleterious mutation and 3 novel indels.
  • One cell line thus appears to have both a germline and a somatic mutation.
  • However, BRCA deficiency (defined by BRCA1/2 gene expression loss (4 tumors) and homozygous deletion (1 tumor) in addition to mutations) was associated with improved PFS in univariate (p = 0.04) and multivariate (p = 0.03) analyses.
  • CONCLUSIONS: The frequency of BRCA1/2 mutations in ovarian tumors detected by sequencing regardless of family history is ≈20%, higher than the expected prevalence of germline mutations.
  • In both BRCA1/2 genes, almost 25% of mutations in tumor tissue were novel and not previously seen in germline DNA.
  • Direct analysis of ovarian tumor tissue is likely to expand the number of women with BRCA-deficient tumors beyond that detectable by germline sequencing.

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  • (PMID = 27962476.001).
  • [ISSN] 1527-7755
  • [Journal-full-title] Journal of clinical oncology : official journal of the American Society of Clinical Oncology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] J. Clin. Oncol.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] United States
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100. Amendola BE, Wolf A, Coy SR, Amendola MA, Eber D: Pineal tumors: analysis of treatment results in 20 patients. J Neurosurg; 2005 Jan;102(s_supplement):175-179
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  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] Pineal tumors: analysis of treatment results in 20 patients.
  • OBJECT: The authors evaluate their results when using gamma knife surgery (GKS) in the management of patients with tumors in the pineal region.
  • METHODS: This is a retrospective clinical evaluation of 20 patients with primary tumors of the pineal region treated with GKS from November 1994 through August 2003.
  • There were 13 germ cell tumors, two pineoblastomas, two low-grade gliomas, one primitive neuroectodermal tumor, one teratoma, and one pineocytoma.
  • Three patients died: one of unrelated causes, one who presented with extensive local disease, and the other of meningeal carcinomatosis with local control of the primary tumor.
  • CONCLUSIONS: This initial experience suggests that GKS is a valuable treatment modality for the management of pineal region tumors.
  • This technique offers excellent local tumor control and minimal patient morbidity, allowing for immediate use of systemic chemotherapy and/or conventional radiation if indicated.

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  • (PMID = 28306462.001).
  • [ISSN] 1933-0693
  • [Journal-full-title] Journal of neurosurgery
  • [ISO-abbreviation] J. Neurosurg.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] United States
  • [Keywords] NOTNLM ; gamma knife surgery / glioma / pineal tumor / pineoblastoma / pineocytoma / primitive neuroectodermal tumor / teratoma
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