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Items 1 to 100 of about 296817
1. Ulusan S, Koc Z, Kayaselcuk F: Spontaneously Ruptured Gastrointestinal Stromal Tumor With Pelvic Abscess: A Case Report and Review. Gastroenterology Res; 2009 Dec;2(6):361-363

  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] Spontaneously Ruptured Gastrointestinal Stromal Tumor With Pelvic Abscess: A Case Report and Review.
  • : Gastrointestinal stromal tumors (GISTs) originate from interstitial Cajal cells on intestinal pacemaker cells that arise from the muscularis propria of the gastrointestinal tract wall.
  • GISTs are characterized by the expression of c-KIT protein (CD 117, stem cell factor receptor) and are the most common mesenchymal tumors of the digestive tract.
  • The rupture of a gastrointestinal stromal tumor of the peritoneal cavity is critical complication, although it is infrequently described in the literature.
  • We describe the computed tomographic findings of a ruptured gastrointestinal stromal tumor of the jejunal wall with an accompanying abscess.

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  • (PMID = 27990209.001).
  • [ISSN] 1918-2805
  • [Journal-full-title] Gastroenterology research
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Gastroenterology Res
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] Canada
  • [Keywords] NOTNLM ; Abdominal abscess / Gastrointestinal stromal tumors / X-Ray computed tomography
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2. Terada T: Endometriosis of the Vermiform Appendix Presenting as a Tumor. Gastroenterology Res; 2009 Dec;2(6):353-355
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  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] Endometriosis of the Vermiform Appendix Presenting as a Tumor.
  • Most patients with this disease are asymptomatic or present as acute or chronic appendicitis.
  • The author herein reports a case of appendiceal endometriosis presenting as a tumor at the appendiceal oriffice.
  • A colon endoscopy showed a tumor in the appendiceal orifice.
  • Two biopsies of the tumor showed no remarkable changes.
  • Imaging modalities including CT and MRI also revealed an appendiceal tumor.
  • Resection of appendix, cecum, ascending colon, terminal ileum, and 16 lymph nodes were performed under the clinical diagnosis of gastrointestinal stromal tumor.
  • Grossly, a tumor measuring 3 x 3 x 3 cm was recognized in the appendiceral orifice.
  • Histologically, the tumor was endometriosis consisting of islands of endometrial glands and stroma.
  • The present case suggests that appendiceal endometriosis may present as a tumor.

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  • (PMID = 27990206.001).
  • [ISSN] 1918-2805
  • [Journal-full-title] Gastroenterology research
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Gastroenterology Res
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] Canada
  • [Keywords] NOTNLM ; Appendix / Endometriosis / Lymph nodes
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3. Haroon M, Kwong WY, Cantwell B, Walker F: A case of cetuximab-related tumour lysis syndrome in metastatic rectal carcinoma. NDT Plus; 2010 Jun;3(3):271-272

  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] A case of cetuximab-related tumour lysis syndrome in metastatic rectal carcinoma.
  • He had the first session of a combined therapy with cetuximab and 5-fluorouracil (5-FU) in March 2009; however, soon afterwards, he presented with the symptoms, signs and biochemistry suggestive of tumour lysis syndrome.
  • Our unusual case highlights that tumour lysis syndrome can also develop in 'low risk' category tumours, and that clinicians should be vigilant in identifying at-risk patients.

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  • [Cites] J Clin Oncol. 2008 May 10;26(14):2406-8 [18467734.001]
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  • (PMID = 28657052.001).
  • [ISSN] 1753-0784
  • [Journal-full-title] NDT plus
  • [ISO-abbreviation] NDT Plus
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] England
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4. Huang JH, Zhang SN, Choi KJ, Choi IK, Kim JH, Lee M, Kim H, Yun CO: Therapeutic and Tumor-specific Immunity Induced by Combination of Dendritic Cells and Oncolytic Adenovirus Expressing IL-12 and 4-1BBL. Mol Ther; 2010 Feb;18(2):264-274
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  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] Therapeutic and Tumor-specific Immunity Induced by Combination of Dendritic Cells and Oncolytic Adenovirus Expressing IL-12 and 4-1BBL.
  • : Recently, gene-based cytokine treatment has been actively pursued as a new promising approach in treating cancer.
  • Moreover, enhanced type-1 antitumor immune response and higher migratory abilities of DCs in tumors were also observed in the combination arms.

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  • [Copyright] Copyright © 2010 The American Society of Gene & Cell Therapy. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.
  • (PMID = 28182938.001).
  • [ISSN] 1525-0024
  • [Journal-full-title] Molecular therapy : the journal of the American Society of Gene Therapy
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Mol. Ther.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] United States
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5. Coelingh Bennink HJT, Singer C, Simoncini T, Genazzani AR, Holinka CF, Kubista E: Estetrol, a pregnancy-specific human steroid, prevents and suppresses mammary tumor growth in a rat model. Climacteric; 2008;11(sup1):29

  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] Estetrol, a pregnancy-specific human steroid, prevents and suppresses mammary tumor growth in a rat model.
  • We report that E<sub>4</sub>, dose-dependently, prevents the growth of chemically induced (7,12-dimethylbenz(a)anthracene, DMBA) mammary tumors in female Sprague-Dawley rats and that E<sub>4</sub> has the potential to reduce the number and size of pre-existing mammary tumors.
  • The antiestrogen tamoxifen was used as reference compound in all three studies and ovariectomy and ethinylestradiol, at estrogenic doses pharmacologically equipotent to E<sub>4</sub>, acted as control treatments in the second prevention study and in the intervention study.
  • Rats treated with DMBA develop estrogen-responsive breast tumors.
  • This model has become the standard pharmacological model to investigate the effect of new compounds on breast tumors.
  • When DMBA-induced rats were co-treated with E<sub>4</sub> for 8 weeks, this resulted in a dose-dependent reduction in the number and size of tumors, an effect that appeared equally effective as tamoxifen treatment or ovariectomy and was not seen with ethinylestradiol.
  • When E<sub>4</sub> was administered to rats in which tumors had already developed, a significant decrease in the number and size of tumors was observed after 4 weeks.

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  • (PMID = 28485647.001).
  • [ISSN] 1473-0804
  • [Journal-full-title] Climacteric : the journal of the International Menopause Society
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Climacteric
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] England
  • [Keywords] NOTNLM ; BREAST TUMOR / DMBA / E4 / ESTETROL / PREVENTION / TREATMENT
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6. Zhou SM, Das SK, Wang Z, Sun X, Dewhirst M, Yin FF, Marks LB: Self-consistent tumor control probability and normal tissue complication probability models based on generalized EUDa). Med Phys; 2007 Jul;34(7):2807-2815

  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] Self-consistent tumor control probability and normal tissue complication probability models based on generalized EUDa).
  • Traditional methods to compute the tumor control probability (TCP) or normal tissue complication probability (NTCP) typically require a heterogeneous radiation dose distribution to be converted into a simple uniform dose distribution with an equivalent biological effect.
  • We demonstrate that (1) for tumors, with each tumor cell independently responding to local radiation dose, a closed-form analytical solution for tumor survival fraction and TCP can be obtained;.
  • (2) for serial structured normal tissues, an exponential power-law form relating survival to functional sub-unit (FSU) radiation is required, and a closed-form analytical solution for the related NTCP is provided;.
  • (3) in the case of a parallel structured normal tissue, when NTCP is determined solely by the number of the surviving FSUs, a mathematical solution is available only when there is a non-zero threshold dose and/or a finite critical dose defining the radiotherapy response.

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  • [Copyright] © 2007 American Association of Physicists in Medicine.
  • (PMID = 28523806.001).
  • [ISSN] 2473-4209
  • [Journal-full-title] Medical physics
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Med Phys
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] United States
  • [Keywords] NOTNLM ; Anatomy / Ancillary equipment / Cancer / Diseases / Dosimetry / EUD / Effects of ionizing radiation on biological systems / Medical treatment planning / NTCP / Numerical modeling / Numerical solutions / Probability theory / Radiation monitoring / Radiation therapy / TCP / Tissues / Treatment strategy / biological effects of ionising radiation / biological tissues / cancer / cell survival fraction / cellular effects of radiation / dose volume histogram / dosimetry / probability / radiation therapy / tumours
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7. Mindermann T: Tumor recurrence and survival following gamma knife surgery for brain metastases. J Neurosurg; 2005 Jan;102(s_supplement):287-288

  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] Tumor recurrence and survival following gamma knife surgery for brain metastases.
  • OBJECT: The authors evaluated prognostic factors for tumor recurrence and patient survival following gamma knife surgery (GKS) for brain metastasis.
  • Long-term survival was associated with a higher risk of tumor recurrence and shorter-term survival was associated with a lower risk.
  • The duration of survival following GKS for brain metastases seems to be characteristic of the primary disease rather than the cerebral disease.
  • CONCLUSIONS: Recurrence rates of brain metastasis following GKS are related to duration of survival, which is in turn mostly dependent on the nature and course of the primary tumor.

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  • (PMID = 28306443.001).
  • [ISSN] 1933-0693
  • [Journal-full-title] Journal of neurosurgery
  • [ISO-abbreviation] J. Neurosurg.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] United States
  • [Keywords] NOTNLM ; brain metastasis / gamma knife surgery / recurrence / survival
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8. Kampschreur LM, Hoogeveen EK, Op den Akker JW, Beutler JJ, Beems T, Dorresteijn LDA, de Sévaux RGL: A haemodialysis patient with back pain: brown tumour as a cause of spinal cord compression under cinacalcet therapy. NDT Plus; 2010 Jun;3(3):291-295

  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] A haemodialysis patient with back pain: brown tumour as a cause of spinal cord compression under cinacalcet therapy.
  • Laboratory tests showed severe hyperparathyroidism [intact parathyroid hormone (iPTH) 69 pmol/L; reference range: 1.3-6.8 pmol/L], hypercalcaemia (2.79 mmol/L), hyperphosphataemia (1.6 mmol/L) and elevated serum total alkaline phosphatase (200 U/L).
  • Magnetic resonance imaging showed a tumour that severely compressed the myelum of the thoracic spine.
  • Histological investigation revealed a brown tumour or osteoclastoma, an erosive bony lesion caused by increased osteoclastic activity and peritrabecular fibrosis.
  • A brown tumour is a benign tumour that is a rare complication of severe renal hyperparathyroidism.
  • The brown tumour developed despite a 1-year treatment of the patient with cinacalcet, which, however, did not result in a major decrease in serum iPTH concentration (from 110 to 69 pmol/L: 37% reduction).

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  • (PMID = 28657067.001).
  • [ISSN] 1753-0784
  • [Journal-full-title] NDT plus
  • [ISO-abbreviation] NDT Plus
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] England
  • [Keywords] NOTNLM ; brown tumour / hyperparathyroidism / osteoclastoma / spine
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9. Wowra B, Muacevic A, Jess-Hempen A, Hempel JM, Müller-Schunk S, Tonn JC: Outpatient gamma knife surgery for vestibular schwannoma: definition of the therapeutic profile based on a 10-year experience. J Neurosurg; 2005 Jan;102(s_supplement):114-118
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  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • OBJECT: The purpose of the study was to define the therapeutic profile of outpatient gamma knife surgery (GKS) for vestibular schwannoma (VS) by using sequential tumor volumetry to quantify changes following treatment.
  • The actuarial 6-year tumor control rate after a single GKS treatment was 95%.
  • Tumor swelling was observed in 43 patients (38.7%).
  • Recurrence was significantly associated with NF2 (p < 0.003) and the reduced dose (p < 0.03) delivered to these tumors.
  • The risk of hearing loss was correlated with age and transient tumor swelling (p < 0.05) but not with dose parameters or NF2.

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  • (PMID = 28306422.001).
  • [ISSN] 1933-0693
  • [Journal-full-title] Journal of neurosurgery
  • [ISO-abbreviation] J. Neurosurg.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] United States
  • [Keywords] NOTNLM ; gamma knife surgery / tumor volumetry / vestibular schwannoma
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10. Pan HC, Sheehan J, Stroila M, Steiner M, Steiner L: Gamma knife surgery for brain metastases from lung cancer. J Neurosurg; 2005 Jan;102(s_supplement):128-133

  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • METHODS: Between February 1993 and May 2003 191 patients underwent treatment for 424 brain metastases from non-small (171 cases) and small cell lung carcinoma (20 cases).
  • Kaplan-Meier survival curves, Cox proportional hazards regression for risk factor analysis, and nonparametric methods for evaluating tumor response were used.
  • There was also no difference between the median survival rates for either tumor type.
  • Tumor control rates varied according to the volume of the metastases and were as follows: 84.4% (< 0.5 cm<sup>3</sup>), 94% (0.5-2 cm<sup>3</sup>), 89.1% (2-4 cm<sup>3</sup>), 93.4% (4-8 cm<sup>3</sup>), 85.7% (8-14 cm<sup>3</sup>), and 87.5% (> 14 cm<sup>3</sup>).
  • Four lesions required post-GKS craniotomy due to swelling or rapid tumor progression.
  • The rate of tumor shrinkage was higher when a volume was 2 cm<sup>3</sup>, lower in cystic lesions, lower in tumors with previous WBRT, and lower for margin doses less than 14 Gy.
  • There was no difference in response rates of the two tumor types, and WBRT did not improve the duration of survival.

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  • (PMID = 28306453.001).
  • [ISSN] 1933-0693
  • [Journal-full-title] Journal of neurosurgery
  • [ISO-abbreviation] J. Neurosurg.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] United States
  • [Keywords] NOTNLM ; brain metastases / gamma knife surgery / non—small cell lung cancer / small cell lung cancer
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11. Serizawa T, Saeki N, Higuchi Y, Ono J, Matsuda S, Sato M, Yanagisawa M, Iuchi T, Nagano O, Yamaura A: Diagnostic value of thallium-201 chloride single-photon emission computerized tomography in differentiating tumor recurrence from radiation injury after gamma knife surgery for metastatic brain tumors. J Neurosurg; 2005 Jan;102(s_supplement):266-271

  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] Diagnostic value of thallium-201 chloride single-photon emission computerized tomography in differentiating tumor recurrence from radiation injury after gamma knife surgery for metastatic brain tumors.
  • OBJECT: The authors assessed the diagnostic value of <sup>201</sup>Tl Cl single-photon emission computerized tomography (SPECT), performed after gamma knife surgery (GKS) for metastatic brain tumors in differentiating tumor recurrence from radiation injury.
  • METHODS: Of 6503 metastatic brain tumors treated with GKS, <sup>201</sup>Tl SPECT was required in 72 to differentiate between tumor recurrence and radiation injury.
  • When the Tl index was greater than 5, the lesion was diagnosed as a tumor recurrence.
  • The sensitivity of the method was 91%; thus <sup>201</sup>Tl SPECT is effective for differentiating between tumor recurrence and radiation injury in metastatic brain tumors treated with GKS.
  • CONCLUSIONS: Used with critical insight <sup>201</sup>Tl Cl SPECT can be useful in distinguishing between tumor regrowth and radiation necrosis in patients with cerebral metastases.

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  • (PMID = 28306470.001).
  • [ISSN] 1933-0693
  • [Journal-full-title] Journal of neurosurgery
  • [ISO-abbreviation] J. Neurosurg.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] United States
  • [Keywords] NOTNLM ; gamma knife surgery / metastatic brain tumor / radiation injury / single-photon emission computerized tomography / thallium-201 / tumor recurrence
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12. Bal A, Mohan H, Chabbra S, Sood S: Causes of enucleation in Northern India (1995-2005). Eur J Ophthalmol; 2007 Jul-Aug;17:638-641

  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • RESULTS: Between January 1995 and June 2005, there were 139,092 outpatients, 6,574 hospital admissions, 12,044 ophthalmic operations, and a total of 48 enucleations in 47 patients.
  • On histopathologic examination, the lesions were categorized into two broad groups: neoplastic (8 cases, 16.6%) and non-neoplastic (40 cases, 83.4%).
  • CONCLUSIONS: In our setting, non-neoplastic lesions are the main cause of eyeball surgery, as compared to the West, where trauma followed by neoplasms constitute important causes.

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  • (PMID = 28221561.001).
  • [ISSN] 1724-6016
  • [Journal-full-title] European journal of ophthalmology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Eur J Ophthalmol
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] Italy
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13. Kobayashi T, Mori Y, Uchiyama Y, Kida Y, Fujitani S: Long-term results of gamma knife surgery for growth hormone-producing pituitary adenoma: is the disease difficult to cure? J Neurosurg; 2005 Jan;102(s_supplement):119-123

  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] Long-term results of gamma knife surgery for growth hormone-producing pituitary adenoma: is the disease difficult to cure?
  • OBJECT: The authors conducted a study to determine the long-term results of gamma knife surgery for residual or recurrent growth hormine (GH)-producing pituitary adenomas and to compare the results with those after treatment of other pituitary adenomas.
  • The mean tumor diameter was 19.2 mm and volume was 5.4 cm<sup>3</sup>.
  • The tumor resolution rate was 2%, the response rate 68.3%, and the control rate 100%.
  • Growth hormone normalization (GH < 1.0 ng/ml) was found in 4.8%, nearly normal (< 2.0 ng/ml) in 11.9%, significantly decreased (< 5.0 ng/ml) in 23.8%, decreased in 21.4%, unchanged in 21.4%, and increased in 16.7%.
  • Serum insulin-like growth factor (IGF)-1 was significantly decreased (IGF-1 < 400 ng/ml) in 40.7%, decreased in 29.6%, unchanged in 18.5%, and increased in 11.1%, which was almost parallel to the GH changes.
  • CONCLUSIONS: Gamma knife surgery was effective and safe for the control of tumors; however, normalization of GH and IGF-1 secretion was difficult to achieve in cases with large tumors and low-dose radiation.
  • Gamma knife radiosurgery is thus indicated for small tumors after surgery or medication therapy when a relatively high-dose radiation is required.

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  • (PMID = 28306435.001).
  • [ISSN] 1933-0693
  • [Journal-full-title] Journal of neurosurgery
  • [ISO-abbreviation] J. Neurosurg.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] United States
  • [Keywords] NOTNLM ; gamma knife surgery / growth hormone—producing pituitary adenoma / insulin-like growth factor
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14. Fijolek J, Wiatr E, Rowinska-Zakrzewska E, Giedronowicz D, Langfort R, Chabowski M, Orlowski T, Roszkowski K: p53 and HER2/neu expression in relation to chemotherapy response in patients with non-small cell lung cancer. Int J Biol Markers; 2006 Apr-Jun;21(2):81-87

  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] p53 and HER2/neu expression in relation to chemotherapy response in patients with non-small cell lung cancer.
  • : The aim of the study was to investigate a relation between p53 and HER2/neu expression in resected lung tumors and the response of those tumors to neoadjuvant chemotherapy.
  • The study population included 67 consecutive patients with non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) in stage II or III who were operated on at the Institute of Tuberculosis, Warsaw, Poland, between 20 April 2001 and 10 March 2003.
  • The response to therapy was assessed as complete response (CR), partial response (PR), stable disease (SD) or progressive disease (PD), on the basis of CT scans performed before and after neoadjuvant chemotherapy. p53 and HER2/neu protein expression were evaluated by immunohistochemistry (IHC) using antibodies against p53 (clone PAb 1801, Novocastra) and against HER2/neu (Dako) in paraffin-embedded specimens of tumors.
  • A response to therapy (CR+PR) was observed in 27 patients, while 40 patients (SD+PD) were regarded as resistant to therapy.
  • Resistance was observed significantly more often in tumors above 3 cm in diameter. p53 expression was found in 16 tumors (23.9%) and HER2/neu in 26 tumors (38.8%).
  • We observed a nonsignificant tendency to chemoresistance in tumors with HER-2/neu overexpression and also in tumors with p53 overexpression.
  • This significance was independent of tumor size.

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  • (PMID = 28207130.001).
  • [ISSN] 1724-6008
  • [Journal-full-title] The International journal of biological markers
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Int. J. Biol. Markers
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] Italy
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15. Poultsides GA, Servais EL, Saltz LB, Patil S, Kemeny NE, Guillem JG, Weiser M, Temple LK, Wong W, Paty PB: Outcome of primary tumor in patients with synchronous stage IV colorectal cancer receiving combination chemotherapy without surgery as initial treatment. J Clin Oncol; 2009 May 20;27(15_suppl):CRA4030

  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] Outcome of primary tumor in patients with synchronous stage IV colorectal cancer receiving combination chemotherapy without surgery as initial treatment.
  • : CRA4030 The full, final text of this abstract will be available in Part II of the 2009 ASCO Annual Meeting Proceedings, distributed onsite at the Meeting on May 30, 2009, and as a supplement to the June 20, 2009, issue of the Journal of Clinical Oncology.

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  • (PMID = 27961295.001).
  • [ISSN] 1527-7755
  • [Journal-full-title] Journal of clinical oncology : official journal of the American Society of Clinical Oncology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] J. Clin. Oncol.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] United States
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16. Nishida T, Takahashi T, Nakajima K, Tsujinaka T, Hirota S: KIT and PDGFRA mutations of gastrointestinal stromal tumor. J Clin Oncol; 2009 May 20;27(15_suppl):10560

  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] KIT and PDGFRA mutations of gastrointestinal stromal tumor.
  • : 10560 Background: KIT or PDGFRA mutations are found in gastrointestinal stromal tumors (GIST) and are correlated with imatinib (IM) effects.
  • Here we examined full sequence of the genes using frozen section of GI mesenchymal tumors.
  • Using RNA obtained from fresh samples of serial 209 pts with GIST (n=174), myogenic (21), neurogenic tumors (11), or GI sarcoma (3), KIT or PDGFRA cDNA was amplified by RT-PCR and fully sequenced.
  • RESULTS: Tumors other than GIST showed no KIT-immunoreactivity, and had no-PCR-products of KIT (32) or wild type (WT) (3).
  • PDGFRA of these tumors is WT.
  • Ex 13 and 17 mutations are missense and Ex 11 showed various type of mutations including deletion, insertion and missense mutations.

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  • (PMID = 27963809.001).
  • [ISSN] 1527-7755
  • [Journal-full-title] Journal of clinical oncology : official journal of the American Society of Clinical Oncology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] J. Clin. Oncol.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] United States
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17. Littlejohn JE, Jupiter D, Cao X, Zhang L, Shabahang M, Smythe WR: BNIP3L (Nix) expression in colon cancer. J Clin Oncol; 2009 May 20;27(15_suppl):e15097

  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • : e15097 Background: Microenvironmental adaptation to hypoxic conditions is critical for a cell to survive in a growing solid tumor.
  • BNIP3L (Nix) mediates apoptosis during hypoxia in cancer cell lines, and Nix knockdown promotes tumor growth in-vivo through decreased apoptosis and increased proliferation, suggesting a means by which cells can adapt.
  • To gain insight into expression of this gene in colon tumors, the present study analyzed mRNA microarray data from 227 colon tumors and 22 normal colon tissue samples and queried differential expression of Nix.
  • These results were compared to the protein levels present in human colon tumors.
  • METHODS: mRNA expression of 227 human colon tumors (made available by the Expression Project for Oncology (expO)) and 22 normal colon samples (retrieved from the Gene Expression Omnibus (GEO)) was analyzed.
  • Immunohistochemistry was performed on human tissue microarray CO701 (US Biomax, Inc.) containing 62 tumor samples.
  • IHC demonstrated variable levels of Nix present in colon tumors: 38/62 (61.3%) of tumors stained positive for Nix while 24/62 (38.7%) were negative.
  • CONCLUSIONS: We have shown that mRNA levels of Nix are upregulated in the transition from normal colon tissue to cancer but that protein levels in tumors demonstrate variable expression.
  • This suggests that silencing of Nix occurs at various stages of tumorigenic progression and results in isolated populations of cells within a growing tumor that are uniquely resistant to apoptosis.
  • Better understanding of Nix in the context of a growing colon tumor is needed and could lead to development of more successful therapeutics.

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  • (PMID = 27964610.001).
  • [ISSN] 1527-7755
  • [Journal-full-title] Journal of clinical oncology : official journal of the American Society of Clinical Oncology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] J. Clin. Oncol.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] United States
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18. Lubner SJ, Chen H, Holen K, LoConte N, Rikkers L, Weber S, Warner T, Eickhoff J, Fass T, Schelman W: A phase II clinical and biological study of lithium carbonate (Li) in patients with low-grade neuroendocrine tumors. J Clin Oncol; 2009 May 20;27(15_suppl):e15662

  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] A phase II clinical and biological study of lithium carbonate (Li) in patients with low-grade neuroendocrine tumors.
  • : e15662 Background: Low-grade neuroendocrine tumors (NETs), such as carcinoid, islet cell tumors, and medullary thyroid carcinomas, respond poorly to chemotherapy, and effective, less toxic therapies are needed.
  • Glycogen Synthase Kinase (GSK)-3β, a multifunctional protein kinase, has been shown to regulate growth and hormone production in NETs.
  • Use of lithium carbonate (Li) in murine models suppressed carcinoid cell growth, reduced GSK-3β levels and reduced expression of chromogranin A.
  • The primary endpoint was objective tumor response by RECIST.
  • Secondary endpoints included overall survival, progression-free survival, decrease of serum tumor markers, toxicity, and quality of life.
  • Patients' diagnoses were carcinoid tumor for 8 subjects, islet cell tumor for 5 subjects, and 2 unknown primary sites.
  • Evaluation of quality of life and GSK-3β levels in tumor tissue is ongoing.
  • We will determine from tumor biopsies whether Li was effective at phosphorylating GSK-3β in order to make conclusions about GSK-3β as a therapeutic target for future NET treatment strategies.

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  • (PMID = 27962770.001).
  • [ISSN] 1527-7755
  • [Journal-full-title] Journal of clinical oncology : official journal of the American Society of Clinical Oncology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] J. Clin. Oncol.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] United States
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19. Horbinski C, Mintz A, Engh J, Lieberman F, Hamilton RL, Park DM: Post-therapeutic changes in the molecular profile of glioblastomas. J Clin Oncol; 2009 May 20;27(15_suppl):2026

  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • : 2026 Background: Glioblastoma multiforme is the most common and malignant primary brain tumor in adults.
  • Analyses were performed on tumor tissue obtained at initial diagnosis and at first recurrence.
  • 24% of previously non-EGFR-amplified tumors acquired low-grade amplification (less than 10 copies/chromosome 7 CEP signal) after treatment, and 16% of EGFR-amplified tumors lost amplification after treatment.
  • CONCLUSIONS: Our results suggest that the molecular profile of these tumors is dynamic and that certain key alterations, including acquisition of low-level EGFR amplification in previously EGFR-negative tumors, occurs in a subset of cases.

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  • (PMID = 27964598.001).
  • [ISSN] 1527-7755
  • [Journal-full-title] Journal of clinical oncology : official journal of the American Society of Clinical Oncology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] J. Clin. Oncol.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] United States
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20. Wulfing C, Herrmann E, Trojan L, Schrader A, Becker F, Stähler M, Haferkamp A, Legal W, Brenner W, Hartmann A, German Papillary Renal Cancer Study Group: Independent validation of the 2002 UICC TNM staging system for papillary renal cell carcinoma in a multicenter cohort. J Clin Oncol; 2009 May 20;27(15_suppl):5092

  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • : 5092 Background: Papillary renal cell carcinoma (pRCC) is the second most malignant histologic subtype in nephrectomy specimens.
  • RESULTS: 498 (74.1%) patients had organ-confined tumor stages (≤pT2).
  • Synchronous distant metastases in the entire group occurred in 58 (8.7%) patients and 69 (11.2%) others developed metastatic disease during follow-up.
  • 5-year CSS in pT1b tumors (90.0%) was significantly shorter compared to pT1a tumors (98.3%) (p = 0.017).
  • Patients with ≥pT3 were at high risk for metastases (50.6%), while metastatic disease associated with ≤pT2 tumors occurred in 7.8% (p < 0.0001).
  • Once metastatic disease was present, prognosis was poor (5-year CSS: 7.2%).
  • Age was associated with a worse prognosis in the subgroup of ≥pT3 tumors in univariate (p = 0.026), but not in multivariate analysis.
  • Clinical and radiologic follow-ups should be offered in frequent intervals to patients with venous thrombus and/or locally advanced disease.
  • The role of age remains unclear, but should not be underestimated at risk stratification after tumor resection.

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  • (PMID = 27964296.001).
  • [ISSN] 1527-7755
  • [Journal-full-title] Journal of clinical oncology : official journal of the American Society of Clinical Oncology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] J. Clin. Oncol.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] United States
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21. Huh WK, Straughn JM Jr, Cohn DE: In vitro chemoresponse assay results and population chemotherapy response rates in endometrial cancer. J Clin Oncol; 2009 May 20;27(15_suppl):5503

  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • METHODS: Tumor specimens were collected from Dec 1, 2007 to July 15, 2008 from 405 consecutive patients with endometrial carcinoma and were tested in vitro for a response by using the ChemoFx assay.
  • Tumors were categorized prospectively as responsive (R), intermediately responsive (IR) or nonresponsive (NR) to each drug or combination tested.
  • The majority of tumors (73%) exhibited varying degrees of responsiveness to different drug(s).
  • No significant difference in response rate was observed between primary and recurrent tumors or between stage I/II and III/IV tumors.
  • CONCLUSIONS: In vitro tumor response rates were similar to reported treatment response rates for all treatments except single-agent carboplatin.

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  • (PMID = 27962441.001).
  • [ISSN] 1527-7755
  • [Journal-full-title] Journal of clinical oncology : official journal of the American Society of Clinical Oncology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] J. Clin. Oncol.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] United States
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22. Huober J, von Minckwitz G, Denkert C, Kleine-Tebbe A, Weiss E, Zahm D, Köhler G, Mehta K, Loib S: Neoadjuvant chemotherapy in operable breast cancer with docetaxel, doxorubicin, and cyclophosphamide (TAC) or TAC followed by vinorelbine and capecitabine (NX): Final results and analysis of markers predicting response to treatment. J Clin Oncol; 2009 May 20;27(15_suppl):524

  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • METHODS: The design of the Gepartrio study was described elsewhere (von Minckwitz et al.).
  • Age at diagnosis, tumor size, lymph node status, estrogen (ER), progesterone (PgR), HER-2 status, histological type, and grade were assessed in uni- and multivariate analysis.
  • The highest pCR rate (60%) was observed in pts with triple neg tumors and < 40 years.
  • In the HR neg subset absence of HER-2 overexpression ("triple neg tumors") resulted in significantly improved pCR rates compared to the HR neg HER-2 pos subset (40.7% versus 31.6%, p=0.041).
  • In univariate analysis predictors for both an early response and a pCR at surgery were age < 40 years, non T4 tumor, grade 3, neg hormone receptors (HR) and a triple neg status.
  • Non lobular histology was only predictive for a pCR in univariate analysis.
  • In multivariate analysis independent factors for early response were non T4 tu, tumors ≥ 40 mm, poor grading and neg HRs.
  • Independent predictors for a pCR remained age < 40 years, poor grading, a non lobular subtype and triple neg tumors.

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  • (PMID = 27960679.001).
  • [ISSN] 1527-7755
  • [Journal-full-title] Journal of clinical oncology : official journal of the American Society of Clinical Oncology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] J. Clin. Oncol.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] United States
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23. Meyniel J, Cottu PH, Stern M, Lebigot I, Mignot L, Roman-Roman S, Sastre-Garau X: A genomic and transcriptomic approach to distinguish primary and metastatic ovary tumors. J Clin Oncol; 2009 May 20;27(15_suppl):e22150

  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] A genomic and transcriptomic approach to distinguish primary and metastatic ovary tumors.
  • : e22150 Background: Distinction of primary ovarian tumors from metastatic tumors involving the ovary is in some cases challenging for final pathologic diagnosis and for treatment with efficient chemotherapy Methods: We gathered from our biobank 16 pairs of breast/ovarian tumors for some of which the diagnosis was uncertain.
  • The pangenomic profiles of 16 pairs of primary breast carcinoma and ovary tumors (primary tumors or metastases from breast carcinoma) from the same patients were analyzed using the Affymetrix GeneChip Mapping 50K (XbaI) SNP arrays.
  • The data were normalized with GCRMA algorithm and a hierarchical clustering of these samples was performed, together with a dataset of primary and secondary ovary tumors.
  • Median time to diagnosis of ovarian tumor was 54 months.
  • Ovarian tumors were considered as primary in 7 patients, and metastatic in 9 patients, and diagnosis was ambiguous in 4 of them.
  • Median survival from breast cancer diagnosis was 78 months, and from ovarian tumor diagnosis was 29 months.
  • CGH array: In 12 pairs, the comparison of genomic profiles one with each other, confirmed the pathological characteristics of the tumors.
  • In 4 cases, the genomic profiles established clearly the status of the ovary tumor whereas the pathological analysis did not.
  • CONCLUSIONS: We clearly established in this training series that CGH array analysis could help to discriminate between primary and secondary ovarian tumors from breast cancer.

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  • (PMID = 27963541.001).
  • [ISSN] 1527-7755
  • [Journal-full-title] Journal of clinical oncology : official journal of the American Society of Clinical Oncology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] J. Clin. Oncol.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] United States
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24. Launay-Vacher V, Janus N, Spano J, Gligorov J, Ray-Coquard I, Beuzeboc P, Morere J, Pourrat X, Deray G, Oudard S: Impact of renal insufficiency on cancer survival: Results of the IRMA-2 study. J Clin Oncol; 2009 May 20;27(15_suppl):9585

  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • Data included: sex, age, weight, serum creatinine, type of tumour, metastasis (bone and/or visceral).
  • RI was strongly linked to mortality (p<0.0001), when analysing all type of patients and tumors.
  • When the same analysis was performed for non-metastatic patients (n=2382), RI was also associated with mortality (p<0.0001).
  • Finally, 2 Cox models adjusted for sex, age, and the 5 main types of tumor were associated with a significant increase in the risk of death for patients with aMDRD<60 as compared to patients without ( Table ).
  • CONCLUSIONS: IRMA-2 is the first large scale study reporting an association between RI and a reduced cancer survival.
  • Cancer patients with aMDRD<60 seemed to be more at risk of death for the following 2 years even in non metastatic patients.

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  • (PMID = 27963707.001).
  • [ISSN] 1527-7755
  • [Journal-full-title] Journal of clinical oncology : official journal of the American Society of Clinical Oncology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] J. Clin. Oncol.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] United States
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25. Raj KP, Ziogas A, Barleben AR, Stamos MJ, Zell JA: Use of tumor site as a prognosticator: Population-based analysis of rectosigmoid and rectum cancers. J Clin Oncol; 2009 May 20;27(15_suppl):4123

  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] Use of tumor site as a prognosticator: Population-based analysis of rectosigmoid and rectum cancers.
  • : 4123 Background: The study examines the prognostic significance of tumor location exclusively in rectosigmoid and rectal cancers.
  • Although tumor location has traditionally been regarded as a prognostic determinant, data in support of this claim are lacking.
  • Sub-site tumor location of the cancers involving the rectum was either defined as rectosigmoid or mid/distal rectum.
  • RESULTS: A total of 33,418 rectal cancer cases were identified, including 12,407 (37.1%) rectosigmoid cancers and 21,011 (62.9%) mid/distal rectum cancers.
  • No significant differences by tumor location were noticed for age, gender, stage, histological type, grade or socioeconomic status.
  • After adjustment for treatment and relevant clinical factors, an improved rate of CRC-specific survival was noticed in non-metastatic rectosigmoid cancers when compared to cancers involving the mid/distal rectum.

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  • (PMID = 27961246.001).
  • [ISSN] 1527-7755
  • [Journal-full-title] Journal of clinical oncology : official journal of the American Society of Clinical Oncology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] J. Clin. Oncol.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] United States
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26. Anthoney DA, MacPherson I, Twelves C, Crawford D, Siller C, Nemat S, Abe M, Miwa M, Evans J: Phase I study of TP300 in patients (pts) with advanced solid tumors. J Clin Oncol; 2009 May 20;27(15_suppl):2563

  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] Phase I study of TP300 in patients (pts) with advanced solid tumors.
  • METHODS: Eligible pts with refractory, advanced solid tumors who had adequate PS, hematologic, renal, and hepatic function were recruited into this open-label, modified- Fibonacci dose escalation ("3 + 3" pts/dose level, with expansion at the MTD) study.
  • Seven pts, all previously treated with irinotecan, had disease stabilisation for 1.5-5 months.
  • CH0793076 PK (AUC and C<sub>max</sub>) were linear from 1 to 10mg/m<sup>2</sup>.

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  • (PMID = 27961884.001).
  • [ISSN] 1527-7755
  • [Journal-full-title] Journal of clinical oncology : official journal of the American Society of Clinical Oncology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] J. Clin. Oncol.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] United States
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27. Cioffi A, LeCesne A, Blay J, Delaloge S, Yovine A, Maki R, Nieto A, Jiao JJ, Demetri GD: Trabectedin phase II clinical trials: Pooled analysis of safety in patients with solid tumors. J Clin Oncol; 2009 May 20;27(15_suppl):e13510

  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] Trabectedin phase II clinical trials: Pooled analysis of safety in patients with solid tumors.
  • This retrospective report on safety includes single-agent trabectedin phase II studies in patients (pts) with solid tumors.

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  • (PMID = 27961298.001).
  • [ISSN] 1527-7755
  • [Journal-full-title] Journal of clinical oncology : official journal of the American Society of Clinical Oncology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] J. Clin. Oncol.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] United States
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28. Poveda A, Kaye SB, McCormack RT, Wang S, Ricci D, Broderick E, Parekh T, Lebedinsky C, Tecero JC, Monk BJ: Circulating tumor cells (CTC) in a study of relapsed/recurrent advanced ovarian cancer: An exploratory analysis in the ova-301 phase III study of pegylated liposomal doxorubicin (PLD) compared with trabectedin and PLD. J Clin Oncol; 2009 May 20;27(15_suppl):5551

  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] Circulating tumor cells (CTC) in a study of relapsed/recurrent advanced ovarian cancer: An exploratory analysis in the ova-301 phase III study of pegylated liposomal doxorubicin (PLD) compared with trabectedin and PLD.
  • : 5551 Background: Circulating tumor cells (CTC) have demonstrated predictive and prognostic value among patients with metastatic breast, colorectal, and prostate cancer.
  • The normal reference range for CellSearch is < 2 CTC/7.5 mLs of blood.
  • Multivariate analyses that include baseline CTC, baseline CA125, platinum sensitivity status, largest diameter lesion, number of tumor lesions, ECOG PS, age, tumor histology, tumor grade and prior taxane show that patients with elevated baseline CTC have 1.58 (p = 0.058) and 1.54 (p = 0.096) fold higher risk for progression and death respectively.

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  • (PMID = 27962543.001).
  • [ISSN] 1527-7755
  • [Journal-full-title] Journal of clinical oncology : official journal of the American Society of Clinical Oncology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] J. Clin. Oncol.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] United States
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29. Zanon C, Airoldi M, Garzaro M, Raimondo L: Functional and psychological evaluation after exclusive chemoradiation therapy in oral and oropharyngeal cancer. J Clin Oncol; 2009 May 20;27(15_suppl):e17012

  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • : e17012 Purpose: The treatment of head and neck tumours often negatively affects speech, swallowing, body image and quality of life (QoL).
  • Late effects of CH-RT and psycho-oncological assessment included: Radiation Therapy Oncology Group (RTOG) - European Organisation for Research and Treatment of Cancer (EORTC) late radiation morbidity scoring system, DISCHE morbidity recording scheme, Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale (HADS), Montgomery Asberg Depression Rating Scale (MADRS), Mini Mental Adjustment to Cancer (MINI MAC), and EORTC QoL Head and Neck 35.
  • Just a fair concordance in rate of depression between self- and hetero-evaluated scale was observed, with higher rates relieved by MADRS compare to HADS depression subscale using 8 or 10 cut-off (Cohen's k test = 0.401) Conclusions: Our data suggest low rates of anxiety and depression, in patients treated with CH-RT, with a different evaluation between self-evaluative and hetero-evaluative scales.

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  • (PMID = 27961727.001).
  • [ISSN] 1527-7755
  • [Journal-full-title] Journal of clinical oncology : official journal of the American Society of Clinical Oncology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] J. Clin. Oncol.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] United States
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30. Gadaleta C, Catino A, Rubini G, Ranieri G, Fazio V, Gadaleta-Caldarola G, Vinciarelli G, Armenise F, Gaudiano A, Mattioli V: Precision pulmonary trans-arterial chemoembolization (PPTACE) plus percutaneous RFA for unresectable lung neoplasms: Initial experience in twelve cases. J Clin Oncol; 2009 May 20;27(15_suppl):7593

  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] Precision pulmonary trans-arterial chemoembolization (PPTACE) plus percutaneous RFA for unresectable lung neoplasms: Initial experience in twelve cases.
  • : 7593 Background: The study aimed to evaluate the feasibility and safety of precision pulmonary arterial chemoembolization (PPTACE) followed by percutaneous RFA in patients with unresectable lung neoplasms Methods: From November 2007 to October 2008, twelve patients (5 male, 7 female, median age 57) and 20 nodules were treated in 14 sessions.
  • Patients had lung metastases from the following tumors: uterine cancer (2), colorectal carcinoma (7), breast carcinoma (1) and two patients had primary unresectable NSCLC.
  • Median diameter of neoplasms was 2 cm.
  • Two patients underwent two sessions of treatment due to bilateral disease.
  • After subclavian vein puncture and mapping of arterial vascularization of the segment including the tumoral nodule, antiblastic agents loaded on microspheres (Hepasphere, 50-100 micron in diameter) were selectively perfused in a subsegmental sector.
  • Morphological response showed a necrotic area, without contrast-enhancement at CT scan, including the neoplasm plus a large safety zone.

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  • (PMID = 27963406.001).
  • [ISSN] 1527-7755
  • [Journal-full-title] Journal of clinical oncology : official journal of the American Society of Clinical Oncology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] J. Clin. Oncol.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] United States
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31. Knauer M, Mook S, Retèl V, Kok M, Wesseling J, Glas AM, Rutgers EJ, van 't Veer LJ, Linn SC: Early determination of metastatic potential in breast cancer: The 70-gene signature in small tumors. J Clin Oncol; 2009 May 20;27(15_suppl):518

  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] Early determination of metastatic potential in breast cancer: The 70-gene signature in small tumors.
  • : 518 Background: Small breast cancers are often considered as low risk tumors in clinico-pathologic risk assessment and treatment guidelines.
  • However, since the ability to metastasize is an early and inherent genetic property of breast cancer and consequently even small tumors can metastasize, identification of prognostic subgroups for patients with small tumors would help to optimize treatment strategies.
  • METHODS: 965 tumor samples of women with pT1 breast cancer from 7 previously reported studies were analyzed and classified by MammaPrint as good or poor prognosis.
  • 10-year distant disease-free survival (DDFS) and breast cancer-specific survival (BCSS) was analyzed according to the 70-gene prognosis signature separately for pT1a/b (1-10mm) and pT1c (11-20mm) tumors.
  • The 70-gene signature accurately predicted differences in 10-year DDFS (HR 2.7 [1.9-3.9], p<0.01) and BCSS (HR 4.0 [2.6-6.3], p<0.01) for all T1 tumors.
  • At 10 years, for small pT1a/b tumors (n=140), DDFS was 93% vs. 78% for the good and poor prognosis groups (HR 3.9 [1.0-15.2], p=0.048), while in the T1c group (n=825) DDFS was 86% vs. 72% (HR 2.6 [1.8-4.0], p<0.01).
  • BCSS was 87% vs. 73% for the good and poor prognosis groups in the T1a/b group (HR 2.4 [0.8-7.7], p=0.128) and 92% vs. 72% (HR 4.4 [2.7-7.1], p<0.01) in T1c tumors, respectively.
  • CONCLUSIONS: The 70-gene signature is a strong and independent prognostic indicator also in small breast tumors.
  • Patients with T1a/b or T1c tumors and a genomic high risk gene signature for developing distant metastases may be selected for additional adjuvant hormonal and chemotherapy.

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  • (PMID = 27960802.001).
  • [ISSN] 1527-7755
  • [Journal-full-title] Journal of clinical oncology : official journal of the American Society of Clinical Oncology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] J. Clin. Oncol.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] United States
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32. Golshayan AR, Elson P, Wood LS, Garcia JA, Dreicer R, Rini BI: Association of tumor burden characteristics with outcomes in patients (pts) with metastatic renal cell carcinoma (mRCC) treated with sunitinib. J Clin Oncol; 2009 May 20;27(15_suppl):5043

  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] Association of tumor burden characteristics with outcomes in patients (pts) with metastatic renal cell carcinoma (mRCC) treated with sunitinib.
  • : 5043 Background: An important goal of non-curative therapy for mRCC is tumor burden (TB) control.
  • However, the impact of tumor burden characteristics on clinical outcome has not been studied in mRCC pts treated with VEGF-targeted therapy.
  • CT scan images were re-reviewed from baseline, at the time of maximal tumor burden shrinkage (TS), at time of disease progression and at time of last assessment prior to death.
  • In multivariable analysis, disease confined to above the diaphragm (p = 0.03) and total TB <13cm (p = 0.09) prior to sunitinib were independent positive predictors of PFS.
  • Total number of metastases <10 (p < 0.001) and tumor volume above the diaphragm <6.5 cm (p = 0.05) were independent positive predictors of OS.
  • At time of disease progression (PD), tumor location and pattern of progression were not associated with OS.
  • CONCLUSIONS: Tumor burden shrinkage and tumor burden at time of disease progression are associated with overall survival in pts with mRCC treated with sunitinib.

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  • (PMID = 27962954.001).
  • [ISSN] 1527-7755
  • [Journal-full-title] Journal of clinical oncology : official journal of the American Society of Clinical Oncology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] J. Clin. Oncol.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] United States
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33. Djahansouzi S, Rostock V, Niederacher D, Rein D, Rath W, Bender H: Effect of endocrine therapy with tamoxifen on hormone receptor status in patients with breast cancer. J Clin Oncol; 2009 May 20;27(15_suppl):e11598

  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • : e11598 Background: Endocrine therapy (ET) of patients with hormone receptor (HR)-positive breast cancer (BC) is thought to adversely affect the HR status of the tumor with time.
  • METHODS: A retrospective analysis of all BC patients presented to the unit between 1999 to 2004 with an initial stage I-III ER-positive BC, who received Tam between 6 and 60 month and went on to develop progressive disease in the form of local recurrence or distant metastasis.
  • Progression was confirmed by tumor biopsy and analysis of the HR status.
  • All patients were evaluated for ER and progesterone receptor (PR) status using immunohistochemistry as well as tumor grading prior to Tam therapy and after relapse.
  • All patient and tumor characteristics, including age, tumor size, histology and adjuvant therapy were similar as published elsewhere.
  • 82% were initially PR-positive.
  • After relapse, 70.1% of tumors retained a positive ER status and only 53% showed positive PR expression.
  • CONCLUSIONS: our data suggests that progression under ET shows a trend towards loss of HR status (ER as well as PR).
  • Therefore, this data is a useful tool for the clinician in evaluating the effectiveness of further ET in patients with progressive BC without having been able to confirm the present HR status through biopsy.
  • Furthermore, as opposed to common belief, the reduction in positive ER tumors showed no correlation with tumor grading.

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  • (PMID = 27964216.001).
  • [ISSN] 1527-7755
  • [Journal-full-title] Journal of clinical oncology : official journal of the American Society of Clinical Oncology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] J. Clin. Oncol.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] United States
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34. Juweid ME, Buck AK, Ponto LL, Mottaghy FM, Syrbu S, Moller P, Vose JM: Association of increase in thymidine uptake relative to tumor cell proliferation in indolent NHLs and DNA repair. J Clin Oncol; 2009 May 20;27(15_suppl):11116

  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] Association of increase in thymidine uptake relative to tumor cell proliferation in indolent NHLs and DNA repair.
  • : 11116 Background: Uptake of radiolabeled thymidine (tdR) or its analogs is frequently used to assess tumor cell proliferation as well as tumor DNA repair synthesis after inhibition of tumor cell proliferation with certain drugs.
  • We determined whether the relationship between thymidine (td) uptake and tumor cell proliferation may be different between indolent and aggressive NHLs.
  • RESULTS: Disproportional increase in FLT-SUVmax relative to tumor cell proliferation was found in indolent NHLs: median %Ki-67 was 5% in indolent vs. 80% in aggressive NHL whereas median FLT-SUVmax was 3.6 vs. 9.4, respectively.
  • The disproportional increase in FLT-SUV in indolent NHLs could not be explained by nonspecific FLT uptake in tumor extracellular space estimated to account for <0.2 SUV unit.
  • These data are in line with a previous study using tdR where the ratios of median tdR (in cpm) to median %-Ki-67 or %-S phase cells in indolent were ∼1.5x those in aggressive NHLs which was associated with relatively increased expression of DNA repair proteins (PCNA) in indolent NHLs (Holte et. al.
  • Acta Oncologica, 1999) Conclusions: Disproportional increase in td uptake relative to %proliferating tumor cells in indolent NHLs likely reflects enhanced DNA repair in quiescent cells or, less likely, constitutively increased Tk<sub>1</sub> expression.

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  • (PMID = 27963480.001).
  • [ISSN] 1527-7755
  • [Journal-full-title] Journal of clinical oncology : official journal of the American Society of Clinical Oncology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] J. Clin. Oncol.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] United States
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35. Dhani NC, Tu D, Parulekar W, Seymour L, Moore MJ: A retrospective analysis of tumor size (TS) as a continuous rather than discrete variable in advanced pancreatic cancer. J Clin Oncol; 2009 May 20;27(15_suppl):e15565

  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] A retrospective analysis of tumor size (TS) as a continuous rather than discrete variable in advanced pancreatic cancer.
  • : e15565 Background: Objective "response rate" (RR) dichotomizes patients into categories of "response" (complete or partial) and "non-response".
  • This ignores a lot of data captured within the trial on tumor size changes, and may miss clinically important effects on tumor growth may occur in the absence of a response.
  • METHODS: Tumor size data from 2 randomized controlled trials in advanced pancreatic cancer conducted by NCIC.CTG were analyzed; NCIC.PA1 randomized patients to BAY12-9566 (MMPI) or Gemcitabine (Gem) and demonstrated a large and significant survival (OS) benefit for Gem (6.7 vs 3.4 months), NCIC.PA.3 randomized patients to Gem ± Erlotinib and showed a modest OS benefit for the combination (HR =0.81).
  • The difference in logarithms (d-LTS) from baseline to 8 weeks was calculated to indicate change in tumor size.
  • Analysis on the 1<sup>st</sup> 130 patients yielded similar results (p=0.02) Conclusions: Tumor size changes may be a reasonable endpoint for screening efficacy trials in advanced pancreatic cancer.

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  • (PMID = 27962325.001).
  • [ISSN] 1527-7755
  • [Journal-full-title] Journal of clinical oncology : official journal of the American Society of Clinical Oncology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] J. Clin. Oncol.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] United States
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36. Lorch A, Beyer J, Mollevi C, Guerra M, Kramar A, International Group on Prognostic Factors in Relapsed or Refractory Germ-Cell Tumors: Prognostic factors in relapsed or refractory male germ cell tumors: Results from an international study of 1,593 patients. J Clin Oncol; 2009 May 20;27(15_suppl):5030

  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] Prognostic factors in relapsed or refractory male germ cell tumors: Results from an international study of 1,593 patients.
  • : 5030 Background: The results of salvage treatment in male patients (pts) with relapsed or refractory germ-cell tumors (rr-GCT) depend considerably on prognostic factors.
  • Cisplatin-refractory or absolute refractory disease was a confounding factor for response to first-line treatment.

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  • (PMID = 27962922.001).
  • [ISSN] 1527-7755
  • [Journal-full-title] Journal of clinical oncology : official journal of the American Society of Clinical Oncology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] J. Clin. Oncol.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] United States
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37. Velinov N, Aebersold D, Haeni N, Hlushchuk R, Weinstein F, Sedlacek R, Djonov V: Matrix metalloproteinase-19 is a predictive marker for tumor invasiveness in patients with oropharyngeal squamous cell carcinoma. Int J Biol Markers; 2007 Oct-Dec;22(4):265-273

  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] Matrix metalloproteinase-19 is a predictive marker for tumor invasiveness in patients with oropharyngeal squamous cell carcinoma.
  • We correlated the immunohistochemical expression pattern with morphological parameters which characterize tumor invasiveness such as keratinization, nuclear polymorphism, invasion pattern, and the host inflammatory response.
  • Local immunoreactivity for MMP-19 was positively correlated with tumor invasiveness as reflected in its structural characteristics and the degree of nuclear polymorphism, and negatively correlated with the inflammatory response of the host.
  • CONCLUSIONS: This latter finding probably reflects the unique change for MMPs from high immunoreactivity within healthy tissue areas and non-invasive tumor parts, through absence in the least invasive neoplastic regions, to strong re-expression at a highly invasive front of the same tumor.
  • Our findings indicate that MMP-19 can be used as a marker for tumor invasiveness in patients with oropharyngeal squamous cell carcinoma.

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  • (PMID = 28207120.001).
  • [ISSN] 1724-6008
  • [Journal-full-title] The International journal of biological markers
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Int. J. Biol. Markers
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] Italy
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38. Ursu R, Carpentier A, Metellus P, Barrie M, Meng Y, Laigle-Donadey F, Tibi A, Chinot O, Carpentier AF: Phase II trial of intracerebral administration of CpG oligonucleotide for patients with recurrent glioblastoma. J Clin Oncol; 2009 May 20;27(15_suppl):2043

  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • When injected locally, they can induce tumor rejection in animal models.
  • The percentage of patients without tumour progression at 6 months after inclusion was the primary endpoint.
  • CpG-28 reached up to 79 ng/mL at the end of infusion in one patient.

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  • (PMID = 27964650.001).
  • [ISSN] 1527-7755
  • [Journal-full-title] Journal of clinical oncology : official journal of the American Society of Clinical Oncology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] J. Clin. Oncol.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] United States
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39. Hussain R, Jamshed A, Rehman K, Iqbal H, Azhar R, Faruqui Z, Ahmed Q: Function preservation with multimodality treatment in locally advanced oral tongue cancer. J Clin Oncol; 2009 May 20;27(15_suppl):e17051

  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • Pretreatment AJCC stage as assessed on MRI was T2N+ (tumour crossing midline) 13%, T3N0 20%, T3N+ 47%, and T4N+ 20%.
  • Four to six weeks following second cycle of chemotherapy local excision of residual primary tumor with ipsilateral modified neck dissection was performed.
  • Patients with ypN+ disease received concomitant 3 weekly cisplatin 75 mg/m<sup>2</sup> with radiation.
  • RESULTS: Overall and disease free survival at 20 months was 60%.
  • Twelve patients (80%) are alive and 3 patients (20%) have died of disease at 9, 14 and 14 months (locoregional failure 1 and distant metastasis 2 patients).
  • In patients alive without disease assessment of deglutition and speech at the time of last follow up showed all patients on full oral diet with spontaneous intelligible speech.

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  • (PMID = 27961816.001).
  • [ISSN] 1527-7755
  • [Journal-full-title] Journal of clinical oncology : official journal of the American Society of Clinical Oncology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] J. Clin. Oncol.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] United States
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40. Bhattacharyya S, Raina V, Shukla NK, Shukla S, Kumar R, Hedau S, Kumar G, Bharti AC, Rath GK, Das BC: Circulating tumor DNA in plasma of breast cancer patients from India. J Clin Oncol; 2009 May 20;27(15_suppl):e22213

  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] Circulating tumor DNA in plasma of breast cancer patients from India.
  • Annually about 80000 new cases and 40000 deaths occur and majority of breast cancers are pre-menopausal.
  • Recently, the level of cell free circulating tumor DNA in blood plasma or serum of patients with variety of tumors are being considered as reliable non-invasive diagnostic tool but no study has been done in India.
  • However, no significant difference could be observed in early stage disease as compared to controls possibly due small sample size.

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  • (PMID = 27964168.001).
  • [ISSN] 1527-7755
  • [Journal-full-title] Journal of clinical oncology : official journal of the American Society of Clinical Oncology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] J. Clin. Oncol.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] United States
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41. Saponara M, Di Battista M, Lolli C, Derenzini E, Pantaleo MA, Santini D, Ceccarelli C, Catena F, Nannini M, Maleddu A, Biasco G: Evaluation of Ki-67 in gastrointestinal stromal tumor (GIST). J Clin Oncol; 2009 May 20;27(15_suppl):e21510

  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] Evaluation of Ki-67 in gastrointestinal stromal tumor (GIST).
  • The two canonical parameters used for the prediction of GISTs' prognosis are tumor size and mitotic index.
  • The aim of our study was to clarify the role of Ki-67 expression as a new biological marker in GISTs.
  • Immunohistochemical analysis for Ki-67 was stained on tissue samples and a cut-off value of >10% immunoreactive cells was used to distinguish between low (<= 10%) and high (>10%) Ki-67 nuclear expression.
  • The expression of this cell-cycle related protein was correlated with tumor site (stomach; any other site), dimensions (<5 cm; >=5cm), mitotic index (<=5/50 HPFs; >5/50 HPFs), standard risk groups (low; intermediate-high) and disease free survival (DFS).
  • RESULTS: Ki-67 over-expression was positively correlated with tumor size >=5cm (p= 0.035).

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  • (PMID = 27963442.001).
  • [ISSN] 1527-7755
  • [Journal-full-title] Journal of clinical oncology : official journal of the American Society of Clinical Oncology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] J. Clin. Oncol.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] United States
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42. Tung CS, Sun CC, Cohen L, Frenkel M, Ramondetta LM, Smith JA, Parker P, Bodurka DC: Complementary and alternative medicine: What do oncology healthcare providers think? J Clin Oncol; 2009 May 20;27(15_suppl):e20614

  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] Complementary and alternative medicine: What do oncology healthcare providers think?
  • : e20614 Background: The use of complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) is growing as the oncology patient (pt) population increases.
  • The purpose of this study was to assess current CAM practice patterns of oncology healthcare providers.
  • Our study suggests that oncology providers critically underestimate the number of patients incorporating CAM into their treatment.

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  • (PMID = 27961537.001).
  • [ISSN] 1527-7755
  • [Journal-full-title] Journal of clinical oncology : official journal of the American Society of Clinical Oncology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] J. Clin. Oncol.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] United States
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43. Robert F, Verschraegen C, Hurwitz H, Uronis H, Advani R, Chen A, Taverna P, Wollman M, Fox J, Michelson G: A phase I trial of sns-314, a novel and selective pan-aurora kinase inhibitor, in advanced solid tumor patients. J Clin Oncol; 2009 May 20;27(15_suppl):2536

  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] A phase I trial of sns-314, a novel and selective pan-aurora kinase inhibitor, in advanced solid tumor patients.
  • : 2536 Background: Aurora Kinases are a family of serine/threonine kinases (Aurora Kinases (AK) A, B, and C) critical for mitosis.
  • Elevated AKs expression occurs in a high percentage of melanoma, colon, breast, ovarian, gastric, and pancreatic tumors; in a subset of these tumors the AURKA locus (20q13) is amplified.
  • Patients (pts) with advanced solid tumors received SNS-314 by 3 hour infusion qweek X 3 (28 day cycle).
  • Six patients had stable disease as their best response.
  • CONCLUSIONS: SNS-314 is a novel inhibitor of AKs A, B, and C.

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  • (PMID = 27961850.001).
  • [ISSN] 1527-7755
  • [Journal-full-title] Journal of clinical oncology : official journal of the American Society of Clinical Oncology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] J. Clin. Oncol.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] United States
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44. Massard C, Huguet H, Kramar A, Beyer J, Hartmann JT, Lorch A, Pico J, Rosti G, Droz J, Fizazi K: Cross-validation of a new prognostic index integrating tumor marker decline in patients with relapsed disseminated germ cell tumors. J Clin Oncol; 2009 May 20;27(15_suppl):5086

  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] Cross-validation of a new prognostic index integrating tumor marker decline in patients with relapsed disseminated germ cell tumors.
  • : 5086 Background: Early serum tumor marker decline during chemotherapy was previously shown to be prognostic for progression-free survival (PFS) and overall survival (OS) in patients with relapsed GCT in an analysis of the IT94 phase III trial, which compared conventional chemotherapy versus high dose chemotherapy (Massard C, ASCO 2008.
  • METHODS: Data on tumor site, response to first line chemotherapy, serum tumor markers at baseline and after two cycles of chemotherapy were obtained from 235 patients accrued in the IT94 trial (training set) and from 181 patients included in phase III prospective trials of high-dose chemotherapy conducted by the German GCT group (Lorch et al, J Clin Oncol.
  • In multivariate analysis of the IT94 trial, an unfavorable AFP decline and a mediastinal primary site were adverse prognostic factors for both PFS and OS, and this was confirmed in the validation set.
  • Among patients from the good prognostic group (favorable AFP decline and non-mediastinal primary site), those who were treated with high-dose chemotherapy had a better PFS (2-year PFS rate: 54% vs 37%; HR = 0.62; p = 0.017), and a trend for a better OS (2-year OS rate: 68% vs. 58%; HR = 0.77; p = 0.29) as compared to patients who were treated with conventional chemotherapy.
  • CONCLUSIONS: AFP decline during the first 6 weeks of salvage chemotherapy and a mediastinal primary tumor site predict for PFS and OS in patients with relapsed disseminated GCT.

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  • (PMID = 27964274.001).
  • [ISSN] 1527-7755
  • [Journal-full-title] Journal of clinical oncology : official journal of the American Society of Clinical Oncology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] J. Clin. Oncol.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] United States
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45. Lesser GJ, Carver KA, Newton SJ, Tallant EA, Gallagher PE: Angiotensin-(1-7), a small molecule inhibitor of glioblastoma growth. J Clin Oncol; 2009 May 20;27(15_suppl):2024

  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] Angiotensin-(1-7), a small molecule inhibitor of glioblastoma growth.
  • : 2024 Background: Recent studies suggest that anti-angiogenic therapies may be effective in patients with glioblastoma multiforme (GBM), a highly vascular tumor.
  • We have previously demonstrated that angiotensin-(1-7) [Ang-(1-7)], an endogenous heptapeptide with anti-angiogenic properties, significantly reduced the serum-stimulated growth of three human glioblastoma cell lines which contained mRNA for the AT<sub>(1-7)</sub> receptor mas.
  • We now provide the first evidence that Ang-(1-7) markedly decreases the proliferation and growth of human glioblastomas in vivo using a xenograft model.
  • METHODS: Athymic mice with tumors resulting from injection of human U87 glioblastoma cells were treated for 18 days with saline or 1000 μg/kg Ang-(1-7), delivered by subcutaneous injection every 12 h.
  • RESULTS: The average volume of the tumors from mice treated with the heptapeptide was approximately 3-fold less than the size of the tumors from control animals (586.1 ± 94.5 mm<sup>3</sup> vs 1845.5 ± 238.1 mm<sup>3</sup>; n = 6, p < 0.05).
  • Further, the tumors from mice injected with Ang-(1-7) weighed almost 50% less than the tumors from mice treated with saline (1.31 ± 0.12 g vs. 2.45 ± 0.23 g; n = 6, p < 0.05).
  • The Ang-(1-7)-mediated reduction in tumor growth was associated with a significant decrease in immunoreactive Ki67, a proliferation marker.
  • In addition, a marked down-regulation of cyclooxygenase 2 (COX-2), prostaglandin E synthase (PGES-1) and vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) was observed in tumors from Ang-(1-7)-injected mice compared to saline-treated controls (COX-2: 1.00 ± 0.06 vs 0.55 ± 0.07 relative gene expression; PGES-1: 1.03 ± 0.08 vs. 0.40 ± 0.06; VEGF: 1.05 ± 0.07 vs. 0.59 ± 0.09; n = 6, p < 0.05) with no effect on COX-1 or PGI synthase mRNA.
  • CONCLUSIONS: These results suggest that Ang-(1-7) may reduce the concentration and ratio of proliferative and anti-proliferative prostaglandins to decrease glioblastoma growth as well as attenuate angiogenesis through a reduction in VEGF.
  • Thus, Ang-(1-7) may be a new, first-in-class small molecule inhibitor for the treatment of glioblastoma, providing combination therapy as a selective COX-2/PGES-1 and angiogenic inhibitor, targeting a specific AT<sub>(1-7)</sub> receptor mas.

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  • (PMID = 27964600.001).
  • [ISSN] 1527-7755
  • [Journal-full-title] Journal of clinical oncology : official journal of the American Society of Clinical Oncology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] J. Clin. Oncol.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] United States
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46. LaRochelle JC, Dastane A, Rao N, Klatte T, Shuch B, Kabbinavar F, Said J, Belldegrun A, Pantuck A: Use of chromosome 9p status to identify a subset of high-risk localized renal cell carcinoma. J Clin Oncol; 2009 May 20;27(15_suppl):5090

  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • : 5090 Background: We investigated whether deletion of chromosome 9p in clear cell renal cell carcinoma (ccRCC) predicts worse disease-specific (DSS) and recurrence-free survival (RFS), and if it is associated with worse prognosis in tumors < 4 cm.
  • Tumor grade, stage, size, 9p status, nodal involvement, and the presence of metastasis were recorded.
  • Disease-specific and recurrence-free survival were determined, and independence was assessed using Cox proportional hazards models.
  • RESULTS: 9p deletions were detected in 14% of tumors.
  • 54% of 9p-deleted tumors were high grade (G3-4) vs. 38% without 9p deletions, and 60% of 9p-deleted tumors were T3-4 vs 38% without 9p deletions (p < 0.01).
  • In localized disease, median RFS for those with 9p deletions was 53 months and was not reached in those without 9p deletions (p<0.01).
  • In 188 patients presenting with localized RCC < 4 cm, loss of 9p occurred in 3/7 (42.9%) of patients with post-nephrectomy recurrence vs. 13/168 (7.2%) of patients without disease recurrence (p = 0.001).
  • DSS for patients with 9p deletion in tumors < 4 cm was significantly worse than DSS in those without 9p deletions (HR 6.18; p = 0.02), and an independent effect on RFS was seen for 9p deletions in localized RCC (HR 2.3, p < 0.01).
  • CONCLUSIONS: Deletion of chromosome 9p in ccRCC occurs in 14% of patients and is associated with higher grade and T stage, presence of nodal and distant disease, worse prognosis, and in patients with small NOMO tumors, 9p deletions but not tumor size was independently associated with RFS.

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  • (PMID = 27964298.001).
  • [ISSN] 1527-7755
  • [Journal-full-title] Journal of clinical oncology : official journal of the American Society of Clinical Oncology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] J. Clin. Oncol.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] United States
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47. Chekerov R, Coumbos A, Sehouli J, Schaedel D, Oskay-Oezcelik G, Lichtenegger W, Kuehn W: Current management of borderline ovarian tumors: A multicenter survey of 323 clinics in Germany, on behalf of the North-Eastern German Society of Gynecological Oncology (NOGGO). J Clin Oncol; 2009 May 20;27(15_suppl):e16568

  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] Current management of borderline ovarian tumors: A multicenter survey of 323 clinics in Germany, on behalf of the North-Eastern German Society of Gynecological Oncology (NOGGO).
  • : e16568 Background: The aim of this survey was to analyze the standard of care in diagnostic, surgery, chemotherapy and aftercare management of patients with Borderline tumor of the ovary (BOT) in Germany.
  • 93.2% of the gynecological departments used additional preoperative diagnostic procedures to the classical bimanual examination and vaginal ultrasound in a case of unclear ovarian tumor: CA-125 or CEA detection (95%), CT-scan (76%), Doppler ultrasound (66%), MRI (36%), or PET-CT (1.7%) techniques.
  • Chemotherapy was the second therapy option (64%) after surgery (97%) for BOT, mostly favored in "high-risk" patients with tumor residual, micro invasion or invasive implants.
  • CONCLUSIONS: These data demonstrate a high clinical unsureness in the clinical management of borderline tumors of the ovary.

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  • (PMID = 27961520.001).
  • [ISSN] 1527-7755
  • [Journal-full-title] Journal of clinical oncology : official journal of the American Society of Clinical Oncology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] J. Clin. Oncol.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] United States
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48. Goldman S, Coiffier B, Reiter A, Younes A, Cairo MS, International TLS Expert Panel: A medical decision tree for the prophylaxis (P) and treatment (T) of tumor lysis syndrome (TLS): An international TLS consensus panel. J Clin Oncol; 2009 May 20;27(15_suppl):e17575

  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] A medical decision tree for the prophylaxis (P) and treatment (T) of tumor lysis syndrome (TLS): An international TLS consensus panel.
  • : e17575 Background: We (MC) previously established a definition of laboratory (LTLS) and clinical TLS (CTLS) and associated grading system (Cairo et al, BJH. 2004).
  • Additionally, we recently reported an evidence based review of guidelines for the P and T of TLS (Coiffier et al, J Clin Oncol. 2008).
  • Rasburicase (R), a recombinant urate oxidase, results in a more rapid and total reduction of uric acid (UA) compared to allopurinol (A) in children at high-risk of TLS (Goldman/Cairo et al, Blood.
  • 2001) and a rapid reduction in UA in adults at high-risk of TLS (Coiffier et al, J Clin Oncol. 2003).
  • METHODS: We convened an international panel (N = 17) of experts in pediatric and adult hematological malignancies and solid tumors (ST) to develop a medical decision tree for the P and T of TLS based on the risk classification (low, medium, high) and management recommendations of Coiffier et al (J Clin Oncol.
  • 2008) Results: Patients without evidence of LTLS were assigned to either low-risk disease (LRD), medium-risk (MRD), or high-risk (HRD).
  • Risk factors included pathological classification stage, bulk, disease burden (WBC/LDH) and renal impairment/involvement.
  • HRD was assigned to patients with either B-ALL, ALL/AML ≥100K/mm<sup>3</sup>, BL/LL stage III/IV, and/or high LDH, DLBCL/PTCL/MCL/ATL with bulky and elevated LDH and patients with MRD with renal impairment/involvement.
  • MRD consisted of ALL ≤100K/mm<sup>3</sup>, AML 25-100K/mm<sup>3</sup>, BL/LL stage I/II and low LDH, childhood ALCL, DLBCL/PTCL/MCL/ATL non-bulky but elevated LDH, CLL treated with targeted therapy, and LRD with renal impairment/involvement.
  • CONCLUSIONS: This medical decision tree will facilitate the practice of management of the P and T of TLS and hopefully improve the quality of care in a cost effective manner.

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  • (PMID = 27963935.001).
  • [ISSN] 1527-7755
  • [Journal-full-title] Journal of clinical oncology : official journal of the American Society of Clinical Oncology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] J. Clin. Oncol.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] United States
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49. Parker S, Berman D, Bennett KL, Alaparthy S, Tsuchihashi Z, Chasalow SD, Zhan P: Increased humoral and cellular immunity in patients (pts) with advanced melanoma treated with ipilimumab. J Clin Oncol; 2009 May 20;27(15_suppl):3031

  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • Humoral response to 5 tumor antigens (Ag) and a control Ag (DHFR) were examined at baseline (BL) and at Wks 4, 8-9, and 12.
  • Peripheral T-cell populations were evaluated through flow cytometry at BL, Wk 4, and Wk 12.
  • Increases from BL in humoral responses to pneumococcal (40-50/78 pts, depending on Ab) and tetanus (58/78 pts) vaccines were noted, even in pts who did not receive on-study pneumococcal (4-9 pts) or tetanus (7 pts) vaccines.
  • Maximum increase from BL of ≥ 5-fold titer (clinically meaningful threshold) in humoral response to tumor Ag MELANA (23.2% of pts), SSX2 (20.3%), NYES01 (18.8%), MAGEA4 (10.1%), and P53 (4.3%) (DHFR, 4.3%) was noted without tumor vaccines.
  • Tumor Ag response was not associated with clinical activity (complete or partial response, or stable disease ≥ 24 wks).
  • Significant increases from BL in percents of HLA-DR+ CD4+ (p = 9.3x10<sup>-7</sup>), HLA-DR+ CD8+ (p = 0.018), and ICOS+ CD4+ (p = 0.0027) effector T cells were noted.
  • Change in tumor Ag response was not associated with clinical activity.

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  • (PMID = 27962083.001).
  • [ISSN] 1527-7755
  • [Journal-full-title] Journal of clinical oncology : official journal of the American Society of Clinical Oncology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] J. Clin. Oncol.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] United States
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50. Marzese DM, Gago FE, Vargas-Roig LM, Roqué M: Methylation profile of human breast cancer: A possible biomarker for the detection of circulating tumor cells. J Clin Oncol; 2009 May 20;27(15_suppl):11112

  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] Methylation profile of human breast cancer: A possible biomarker for the detection of circulating tumor cells.
  • One of the most common epigenetic mechanisms by which genes are silenced is the aberrant methylation of their promoter CpG islands, i.e. hypermethylation in promoters of Tumor Suppressor Genes.
  • The identification of circulating tumor cells (CTCs) in the blood of cancer patients, based on their aberrant methylation profile, appears as a potential tool for early detection and provides therefore the promise of a non-invasive and affordable cancer detection test.
  • METHODS: The methylation status of 26 cancer-related regions was studied, using Methyl Specific-Multiplex Ligation dependent Probe Amplification (MS-MLPA) assay in invasive breast tumors (n=24), axillary lymph nodes (n= 5), and normal breast tissue (n=2).
  • A nested-Methyl Specific PCR (Nested-MSP) was designed for one of the methylated regions in the tumor suppressor gene rassf1A, to identify CTCs in peripheral blood samples.
  • Blood samples from non tumor individuals were used as control.
  • The profiles were specific for each tumor.
  • The specific methylation profile of tumors could be used to identify the metastasis origin in a patient with a left-sided breast tumor and bilateral tumor invasion of axillary lymph nodes.
  • CONCLUSIONS: The identification of the methylation profile of the tumor by MS-MLPA allowed to establish the metastasis origin of invaded axillary lymph nodes and to detect CTCs in peripheral blood of a cancer patient.

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  • (PMID = 27963494.001).
  • [ISSN] 1527-7755
  • [Journal-full-title] Journal of clinical oncology : official journal of the American Society of Clinical Oncology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] J. Clin. Oncol.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] United States
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51. Rohr UP, Augustus S, Lasserre SF, Compton P, Huang J: Safety of bevacizumab in patients with metastases to the central nervous system. J Clin Oncol; 2009 May 20;27(15_suppl):2007

  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • The background rate of CNS hemorrhage (CH) in cancer patients with brain metastases not receiving bevacizumab (BV) treatment is 5%-29%, depending on tumor type.
  • In this particular tumour type, up to 87.5% has been reported as a background rate of CH without BV use.
  • While patients with known CNS metastases, based on imaging or clinical signs and symptoms, were excluded from trial in A and B datasets, patients who were found to have CNS lesions had either unrecognized CNS metastases at study entry or had developed these during the trial.
  • Ongoing trials are expected to provide additional data regarding the risk of CH in patients with primary and metastatic CNS tumors.

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  • (PMID = 27964560.001).
  • [ISSN] 1527-7755
  • [Journal-full-title] Journal of clinical oncology : official journal of the American Society of Clinical Oncology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] J. Clin. Oncol.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] United States
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52. Okamoto I, Kaneda H, Satoh T, Okamoto W, Terashima M, Arao T, Nishio K, Nakagawa K, Konishi K, Kaiser R: Phase I clinical and biomarker study of BIBF 1120, an oral multitarget tyrosine kinase inhibitor, in patients with advanced solid tumors (ST): Impact of CD133- and CD117-positive cells on a biomarker of an antiangiogenic inhibitor. J Clin Oncol; 2009 May 20;27(15_suppl):3572

  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] Phase I clinical and biomarker study of BIBF 1120, an oral multitarget tyrosine kinase inhibitor, in patients with advanced solid tumors (ST): Impact of CD133- and CD117-positive cells on a biomarker of an antiangiogenic inhibitor.
  • : 3572 Background: BIBF 1120 (Vargatef) is an orally bioavailable small molecule inhibitor of multiple receptor tyrosine kinases, including vascular endothelial growth factor receptors, fibroblast growth factor receptors and platelet-derived growth factor receptors.
  • METHODS: BIBF 1120 (150-250 mg) was administered orally twice-daily (bid) to heavily pre-treated solid tumor (ST) patients to determine safety, tolerability, maximum tolerated dose (MTD) and pharmacokinetics (PK).
  • Best observed responses were stable disease in 16 (76.2%) patients and median progression-free survival was 113 days (95% CI: 77-119 days).
  • In addition, CD133<sup>+</sup>CD117<sup>+</sup> cells tended to decrease in responders (stable disease) to a greater extent than in non- responders after treatment.

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  • (PMID = 27961723.001).
  • [ISSN] 1527-7755
  • [Journal-full-title] Journal of clinical oncology : official journal of the American Society of Clinical Oncology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] J. Clin. Oncol.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] United States
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53. Olson RA, Iverson G, Parkinson M, Carolan H, Ellwood A, McKenzie M: Investigation of cognitive screening measures in patients with brain tumors: Diagnostic accuracy and correlation with quality of life. J Clin Oncol; 2009 May 20;27(15_suppl):e13000

  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] Investigation of cognitive screening measures in patients with brain tumors: Diagnostic accuracy and correlation with quality of life.
  • : e13000 Background: Brief cognitive screening measures are often selected by clinicians and researchers for brain tumor patients, primarily because of their ease of use.
  • METHODS: 44 patients with brain tumors were prospectively accrued and administered the MMSE and MoCA by blinded investigators, 75% of who completed a 4-hour "gold standard" neuropsychological assessment (NPA).
  • RESULTS: 55% of patients met criteria for the DSM-IV diagnosis of Cognitive Disorder NOS on the NPA.
  • A MoCA cutoff of 22 had 28% sensitivity and 93% specificity, and a cutoff of 28 had 94% sensitivity and 20% specificity.
  • Despite its limitations, the MoCA may offer cost saving in the oncology clinic as a cognitive screen: individuals with MoCA scores a) below 22 are likely cognitively impaired, b) above 27 are likely cognitively normal, and c) 22-27 would likely benefit most from NPA.

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  • (PMID = 27962771.001).
  • [ISSN] 1527-7755
  • [Journal-full-title] Journal of clinical oncology : official journal of the American Society of Clinical Oncology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] J. Clin. Oncol.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] United States
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54. Recht LD, Mechtler L, Phuphanich S, Hormigo A, Hines V, Milsted R, O'Connor PC, Ryan RP, Wong ET: A placebo-controlled study investigating the dexamethasone-sparing effects of corticorelin acetate in patients with primary or metastatic brain tumors and peritumoral edema. J Clin Oncol; 2009 May 20;27(15_suppl):2078

  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] A placebo-controlled study investigating the dexamethasone-sparing effects of corticorelin acetate in patients with primary or metastatic brain tumors and peritumoral edema.
  • : 2078 Background: The standard therapy for patients with peritumoral edema (PTE) associated with cerebral tumors is long-term dexamethasone (dex), which is associated with significant short- and long-term adverse events (AEs).
  • This study investigated the steroid-sparing effect of CrA in patients with cerebral tumors and PTE.
  • CONCLUSIONS: CrA may benefit patients with symptoms of PTE associated with primary or metastatic cerebral tumors by allowing them to reduce/stop their dex treatment, so reducing the incidence of the steroid-related AEs of myopathy, cushingoid symptoms, and skin disorders.

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  • (PMID = 27964375.001).
  • [ISSN] 1527-7755
  • [Journal-full-title] Journal of clinical oncology : official journal of the American Society of Clinical Oncology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] J. Clin. Oncol.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] United States
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55. Calvo A, Ponz-Sarvisé M, Rosell D, Redrado M, Nguewa PA, García-Foncillas J, Abella L, Panizo A, Gil-Bazo I: Use of an inhibitor of differentiation-1 (Id1) expression (exp) to discriminate good prognosis (GP) from poor prognosis (PP) prostate cancer (PCa). J Clin Oncol; 2009 May 20;27(15_suppl):e16128

  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • : e16128 Background: In the PSA era a significant proportion of PCa patients (pts) at onset have potential indolent tumors that will not impact their life expectancy or quality of life.
  • Using a new monoclonal antibody (MoAb) (195-14) for immunohistochemistry (IHC), Id1 exp is limited to some PP breast and bladder tumors.
  • All formalin-fixed and paraffin-embedded primary biopsies and matched mts of 16 of them were stained for tumor and end cell Id1 exp.
  • RESULTS: GP group: median age 65, all pts T2N0M0, median Gleason score 6 (6-9), median PSA at onset 5,5 ng/ml.
  • PP group: median age was 70, T3-T4 (70%), Gleason 8-10 (61%), median PSA at onset 58 ng/ml, 2 or more mts locations (79%), 94% showed P to docetaxel, median time-to- progression and overall survival after chemotherapy were 18 weeks and 7 ms.
  • Among PP, 39% of primary PCa and 38% of mts showed Id1 tumor cell exp and 79% of primary tumors and 81% of mts showed end Id1 exp.
  • In the GP group 0% showed Id1 tumor cell exp, and 50% showed end Id1 exp.
  • The unexpected Id1 exp difference in tumor cells in PP compared to GP pts predicted clinical outcome.

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  • (PMID = 27963376.001).
  • [ISSN] 1527-7755
  • [Journal-full-title] Journal of clinical oncology : official journal of the American Society of Clinical Oncology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] J. Clin. Oncol.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] United States
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56. Hu M, Yu J, Liu N, Kong L, Zhang P: The role of whole body &lt;sup&gt;18&lt;/sup&gt;F-FDG PET/CT scan in patients with carcinoma of unknown primary. J Clin Oncol; 2009 May 20;27(15_suppl):e22051

  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • : e22051 Background: Carcinoma of unknown primary (CUP) is a heterogeneous group of tumors and usually follows an aggressive biological and clinical behavior.
  • Difficult challenges in oncology which the identification of the primary tumor and a complete disease staging could offer a more rational and efficient treatment in order to improve the survival time.
  • Our aim was to evaluate the role of <sup>18</sup>F-FDG PET/CT scan with two aspects: detection of the primary site, and estimation of tumor biological behavior which essential for the development of new, individual and targeted effective therapies.
  • RESULTS: In 42 (35.90%) patients, a primary tumor site which was confirmed by follow-up or surgery was showed by PET/CT.
  • In 15 (12.82%) patients, the primary tumor site was suggested by PET/CT but not confirmed.
  • In 60 (51.28%) patients, the primary tumor site was not localized modifying the stage of disease.
  • Overall, the following oncological treatment was influenced by the PET/CT scan, in a total of 38 (32.47%) patients.
  • A significantly higher SUVmax was found among patients with poorly or undifferentiated carcinoma compared with patients with well to moderately ( t=4.013, p<0.01) differentiation; In 42 patients with a confirmed primary tumor site, the SUVmax of Metastatic tumours have a closely relationship correlate with those of primary tumours, ( r=0.738, p<0.01).
  • Furthermore, a significantly higher SUVmax was found among metastases compared with primary tumors ( t=3.470, p<0.01).
  • CONCLUSIONS: Our data strongly support <sup>18</sup>F-FDG PET/ CT imagings not only provide new insights in the diagnosis and staging of patients with CUP, but also evaluate biologic characters of tissue.

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  • (PMID = 27963233.001).
  • [ISSN] 1527-7755
  • [Journal-full-title] Journal of clinical oncology : official journal of the American Society of Clinical Oncology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] J. Clin. Oncol.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] United States
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57. Mechtler L, Wong ET, Hormigo A, Pannullo S, Hines V, Milsted R, O'Connor PC, Ryan RP, Recht L: A long-term open-label extension study examining the steroid-sparing effects of corticorelin acetate in patients with cerebral tumors. J Clin Oncol; 2009 May 20;27(15_suppl):2079

  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] A long-term open-label extension study examining the steroid-sparing effects of corticorelin acetate in patients with cerebral tumors.
  • The objective of this study was to evaluate long-term safety, tolerability and steroid-sparing potential of CrA in patients with primary or secondary brain tumors and peritumoral edema.
  • CONCLUSIONS: These findings indicate that CrA is safe and well-tolerated, and may enable substantial reduction or cessation of dex therapy for many patients with cerebral tumors.

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  • (PMID = 27964371.001).
  • [ISSN] 1527-7755
  • [Journal-full-title] Journal of clinical oncology : official journal of the American Society of Clinical Oncology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] J. Clin. Oncol.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] United States
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58. Schellhorn S, Lessen DS, Levine RL, Panagopoulos G, Arnold RM, Block SD, Buss MK: Palliative care training and burnout in oncology fellows. J Clin Oncol; 2009 May 20;27(15_suppl):9540

  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] Palliative care training and burnout in oncology fellows.
  • We sought to determine rates and predictors of burnout in oncology fellows.
  • METHODS: As part of a larger study on fellows' attitudes, education, and experiences in palliative care, we administered the 22 item Maslach Burnout Inventory (MBI) to second year U.S. oncology fellows.
  • The 104 item instrument, modified from a survey of medical students, was revised after field testing and a pilot survey.
  • Gender, race, and location of medical school (U.S. vs. other) did not differ between respondents and non-respondents.
  • CONCLUSIONS: Over half of oncology fellows experience at least one domain of burnout.

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  • (PMID = 27964528.001).
  • [ISSN] 1527-7755
  • [Journal-full-title] Journal of clinical oncology : official journal of the American Society of Clinical Oncology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] J. Clin. Oncol.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] United States
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59. Wang-Gillam A, Novello S, Williams K, Gao F, Scagliotti GV, Govindan R: An international comparison of barriers in opening oncology clinical trials. J Clin Oncol; 2009 May 20;27(15_suppl):6580

  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] An international comparison of barriers in opening oncology clinical trials.
  • This study aims to compare the procedures and time required to open thoracic oncology trials at a United States academic center to a similar center in Europe.
  • METHODS: A retrospective review was performed of all thoracic oncology therapeutic trials submitted for regulatory review between 2001-2008 at Washington University School of Medicine (WUSM) and the University of Torino, Italy (UT).
  • RESULTS: A total of 137 therapeutic thoracic oncology trials were reviewed, 83 from WUSM and 54 from UT.

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  • (PMID = 27963821.001).
  • [ISSN] 1527-7755
  • [Journal-full-title] Journal of clinical oncology : official journal of the American Society of Clinical Oncology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] J. Clin. Oncol.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] United States
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60. Helft PR, Terry C, Chamness AR, Uhrich MM: Oncology nurses' views of oncologists' prognosis-related communication (PRC). J Clin Oncol; 2009 May 20;27(15_suppl):6602

  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] Oncology nurses' views of oncologists' prognosis-related communication (PRC).
  • The role oncology nurses (RNs) play in PRC and their views and experiences of PRC among MDs with whom they work is unknown.
  • METHODS: Mail survey of a random sample of Oncology Nursing Society members with at least one year of experience working with cancer patients (pts).
  • CONCLUSIONS: Oncology RNs identify several deficits in MDs' PRC with ACPs, including provision of information early in the course of illness, gaps in sharing content of PRC with RNs, and communicative aspects of team-based pt care.

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  • (PMID = 27961728.001).
  • [ISSN] 1527-7755
  • [Journal-full-title] Journal of clinical oncology : official journal of the American Society of Clinical Oncology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] J. Clin. Oncol.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] United States
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61. Tsien C, Nyati M, Chepeha D, Worden F, Helman J, Bradford C, Wolf G, Lawrence T, Eisbruch A: Differential tumor and normal mucosa biomarker modulation by epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) inhibition using erlotinib in oral cavity squamous cell carcinoma (OCSCC). J Clin Oncol; 2009 May 20;27(15_suppl):6077

  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] Differential tumor and normal mucosa biomarker modulation by epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) inhibition using erlotinib in oral cavity squamous cell carcinoma (OCSCC).
  • : 6077 Background: Targeted therapy may improve the therapeutic index in locally advanced head neck cancer if differential EGFR inhibition in tumors compared to the normal mucosa is demonstrated.
  • The aim of this pilot study was to determine if there are differences in biomarker modulation between tumor and the normal mucosa and confirm our initial preclinical findings regarding EGFR degradation.
  • METHODS: Patients with primary OCSCC requiring surgical resection had normal mucosa and tumor biopsies prior to a test course of erlotinib.
  • Repeat tumor and normal mucosal biopsies were obtained at the time of surgical resection to evaluate the effect of the EGFR inhibitor on both tumor and the normal mucosa.
  • RESULTS: 12 pts were enrolled; 7 pts with paired tumor and normal mucosa biopsies.
  • Tumor specimens showed over-expression of EGFR compared to the normal mucosa (p = 0.005).
  • Erlotinib treatment led to marked inhibition of both pEGFR and EGFR protein (p = 0.004 and p = 0.007, respectively) in tumor biopsies.
  • In contrast, we found heterogeneity in EGFR inhibition in the normal mucosa following erlotinib. (p = 0.1 [pEGFR], and p = 0.07 [EGFR)]) We noted dramatic reduced levels of pSrc and pSTAT3 following erlotinib in tumors compared to untreated matched tumor samples.
  • CONCLUSIONS: Differential EGFR inhibition in tumors compared to the normal mucosa, may suggest that the addition of EGFR inhibitors to chemo-RT or accelerated RT, whose dose limiting toxicity is acute mucositis, may select patients who will benefit from targeted therapy.

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  • (PMID = 27961953.001).
  • [ISSN] 1527-7755
  • [Journal-full-title] Journal of clinical oncology : official journal of the American Society of Clinical Oncology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] J. Clin. Oncol.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] United States
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62. Schmitz AC, van den Bosch MA, Loo C, Peterse JL, Gertenbach M, Mali WP, Rutgers EJ, Gilhuijs KG: Visualization of invasive breast cancer and its subclinical disease spread within the breast: Precise correlation between MR imaging findings and histopathologic findings. J Clin Oncol; 2009 May 20;27(15_suppl):610

  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] Visualization of invasive breast cancer and its subclinical disease spread within the breast: Precise correlation between MR imaging findings and histopathologic findings.
  • Nonetheless, MRI may under- or overestimate the extent of invasive disease, and the ability of MRI to depict components of disease around the primary invasive tumor is not well established.
  • The purpose of this study was to precisely correlate MRI findings with histopathologic findings in breast cancer patients and to establish the incidence and quantity of surrounding MRI occult disease in breast cancer patients that are scheduled for breast-conserving therapy (BCT).
  • Tumors were stratified by absence or presence of an extensive intraductal component (EIC- or EIC+).
  • The largest diameter of the MRI-visible lesion was compared with the largest diameter of the primary invasive tumor at pathology.
  • Distances (mm) between the edge of the MRI-visible lesion and surrounding subclinical tumor foci (i.e., DCIS, invasive foci) were measured.
  • At various distances from the edge of the MRI-visible tumor, the incidence of disease was determined.
  • RESULTS: 53 patients with 54 breast tumors were included.
  • 42 tumors were EIC- and 12 were EIC+.
  • The mean size (± SD) of the primary invasive tumor was 18.1 ± 7.5 mm on MRI and 19.5 ± 8.2 mm on pathology (Pearson's correlation coefficient: 0.75).
  • The MRI-visible lesion was larger than or equal to the primary invasive tumor on pathology in 21 (39%) cases.
  • Underestimation of the primary invasive tumor occurred up to 7 mm from the edge of the MRI-visible lesion.
  • Beyond 10 mm, subclinical tumor foci were found in 48% off all tumors, in 36% and 92% of EIC- and EIC+ tumors (p < 0.001).
  • CONCLUSIONS: Disease around MRI-visible lesions may be more extensive than assumed prior to treatment, especially in EIC+ tumors.

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  • (PMID = 27961480.001).
  • [ISSN] 1527-7755
  • [Journal-full-title] Journal of clinical oncology : official journal of the American Society of Clinical Oncology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] J. Clin. Oncol.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] United States
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63. Spreafico F, Piva L, D'Angelo P, Terenziani M, Collini P, Gandola L, Bianchi M, Tamburini A, Provenzi M, Fossati Bellani F: Are all stage III Wilms tumors the same? Data from the Associazione Italiana Ematologia Oncologia Pediatrica (AIEOP). J Clin Oncol; 2009 May 20;27(15_suppl):10030

  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] Are all stage III Wilms tumors the same? Data from the Associazione Italiana Ematologia Oncologia Pediatrica (AIEOP).
  • : 10030 Background: Criteria to classifying Wilms tumor (WT) as stage III are much heterogeneous, including factors referring both to tumor biology and surgical skills.
  • Reasons for stage III as follows: lymph nodes (LN) 40 cases (alone 28 cases, combined with other factors 12); cava vein tumor thrombus 7, peritoneum involvement 8, post-operative gross or microscopic tumor remains 24, pre-operative rupture 9, surgical rupture 17.
  • Overall 16 tumor failure occurred (2 in anaplastic tumors): abdominal relapse 8 (combined to other extra-abdominal site 3), lung 5, tumor progression 2, metacronous tumor 1.
  • Overall, RFS was 75% ±7 in patients with at least LN involvement compared to 89% ±4 in patients classified as stage III for the remaining criteria, including those without LN sampling (Logrank p.09).
  • 1440 cGy flank RT warranted satisfactory local tumor control.

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  • (PMID = 27962574.001).
  • [ISSN] 1527-7755
  • [Journal-full-title] Journal of clinical oncology : official journal of the American Society of Clinical Oncology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] J. Clin. Oncol.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] United States
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64. Mergenthaler U, Heymanns J, Köppler H, Thomalla J, van Roye C, Weide R: Evaluation of psycho-social distress in patients treated in a community-based oncology group practice in Germany. J Clin Oncol; 2009 May 20;27(15_suppl):e20577

  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] Evaluation of psycho-social distress in patients treated in a community-based oncology group practice in Germany.
  • : e20577 Background: Systematic evaluation of psycho-social distress in oncology outpatients is an important issue.
  • Patients were classified into the disease groups solid tumors, hematological neoplasms, benign hematological diseases and other non-malignant diseases.
  • Patients with other non-malignant diseases (81% autoimmune diseases or hereditary hemochromatosis) showed the highest average distress level of 5.2.
  • Regarding the treatment phases, the most distressed patients were patients who just learned about their diagnosis of relapsed or metastatic disease (6.4), patients receiving Best Supportive Care (5.4) and patients receiving adjuvant anti-hormonal therapy (5.4).
  • CONCLUSIONS: The study shows that cancer patients do not necessarily show higher distress than patients with severe non-malignant diseases.

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  • (PMID = 27961101.001).
  • [ISSN] 1527-7755
  • [Journal-full-title] Journal of clinical oncology : official journal of the American Society of Clinical Oncology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] J. Clin. Oncol.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] United States
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65. Xu Y, Fan J, Yang X, Zhou J, Qiu S: High expression levels of putative hepatic stem/progenitor cells biomarkers related to tumor angiogenesis and poor prognosis of hepatocellular carcinoma. J Clin Oncol; 2009 May 20;27(15_suppl):e22121

  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] High expression levels of putative hepatic stem/progenitor cells biomarkers related to tumor angiogenesis and poor prognosis of hepatocellular carcinoma.
  • METHODS: Fourteen biomarkers related with HSCs/HPCs or tumor angiogenesis were assessed by qRT-PCR and then validated by tissue microarrays (TMAs) in three independent cohorts of HCC patients underwent curative resection (n=67, 314 and 73).
  • Based on Cox regression, a simplified model including CD133, CD44, Nestin, and MVD was constructed and confirmed as an independent predictor for OS (p<0.0001) and RFS (p<0.0001), regardless of alpha-fetoprotein level, tumor stage and recurrence time (p<0.0001 for all).
  • CONCLUSIONS: High expression levels of HSCs/HPCs biomarkers are related to tumor angiogenesis and poor prognosis of HCC.
  • The simplified model based on HSCs/HPCs and tumor angiogenesis profile can be used to classify HCC patients with high risk of tumor recurrence after operation.

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  • (PMID = 27963559.001).
  • [ISSN] 1527-7755
  • [Journal-full-title] Journal of clinical oncology : official journal of the American Society of Clinical Oncology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] J. Clin. Oncol.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] United States
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66. Burg ME, Janssen JT, Ottevanger PB, Kerkhofs LG, Valster F, Stouthard JM, Onstenk W, Termorshuizen F, Verweij J: Multicenter randomized phase III trial of 3-weekly paclitaxel/platinum (PC3w) versus weekly paclitaxel/platinum (PCw) induction therapy followed by PC3w maintenance therapy in advanced epithelial ovarian cancer (EOC). J Clin Oncol; 2009 May 20;27(15_suppl):5538

  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • METHODS: 270 patients (pts) with FIGO stage II-IV, Performance status (PS) 0-2 were randomly assigned to 3 x PC3w (P 175mg/m2 with either cisplatin [Cis] 75mg/m<sup>2</sup> or carboplatin [Car] AUC 6) or 6 x PCw (P 90mg/m2 with either Cis 70mg/m<sup>2</sup> or Car AUC 4, day 1,8,15 and day 29,36,43) followed by up to 6 cycles PC3w in both arms.
  • Pts were stratified for FIGO stage, PS, tumor size and center.
  • RESULTS: 267 pts (134 TC-3w and 133 TCw) were eligible (3 pts wrong tumor type).
  • Pt characteristics were well balanced; median age 58 years, serous 62%, residual disease >1cm 66%, FIGO stage II 7%, III 64%, IV 29%.
  • Median dose-intensity for PC3w was: P 58(47-58) and Cis 25(22.5-25) mg/m<sup>2</sup>/w, Car 2(1.6-2) AUC/w, for PCw: P 60(36-60) and Cis 44.7(30-44.7) mg/m<sup>2</sup>/w and for Car 2.7(1,6-2,7) AUC/w.
  • RR after induction therapy in 176 pts with measurable disease was 72% for TC3w and 74% for TCw (p = 0.68).

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  • (PMID = 27962486.001).
  • [ISSN] 1527-7755
  • [Journal-full-title] Journal of clinical oncology : official journal of the American Society of Clinical Oncology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] J. Clin. Oncol.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] United States
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67. Kakeji Y, Mizokami K, Sumiyoshi Y, Yoshinaga K, Saeki H, Tokunaga E, Endo K, Morita M, Kitao H, Emi Y, Maehara Y: The prognostic impact of hypoxia-inducible factor-1α and VEGF, IGF-2, p21, p53 expression in gastric adenocarcinoma. J Clin Oncol; 2009 May 20;27(15_suppl):4571

  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • : 4571 Background: Hypoxia caused by either radiation or chemotherapy induces various intracellular adaptive responses, which contribute to tumor progression.
  • The clinicopathological characteristics of human gastric cancer and the clinical outcomes were analyzed to investigate the effects of the expression of hypoxia-inducible factor1α (HIF-1α) and some related proteins, such as, vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF), insulin-like growth factor-2 (IGF-2), p21, and p53 on the prognosis of human gastric cancer.
  • In addition, the HIF-1α expression positively correlated with the tumor size and depth of invasion, while it was also more frequent in tumors with lymphatic invasion and undifferentiated adenocarcinomas.
  • HIF-1α-positive/p21-negative tumors had a lower apoptotic index, and the patients with such tumors also had a significantly poorer prognosis.
  • Similarly, HIF-1α-positive/p53-positive tumors had a significantly poorer prognosis.
  • Controlling hypoxia, especially in the HIF-1α pathways, may therefore hold the key to a greater individualization of therapy and also lead to the development of new treatments for patients with gastric cancer.

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  • (PMID = 27963078.001).
  • [ISSN] 1527-7755
  • [Journal-full-title] Journal of clinical oncology : official journal of the American Society of Clinical Oncology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] J. Clin. Oncol.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] United States
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68. Ito Y, Hatake K, Takahashi S, Yokoyama M, Suenaga M, Ota M, Onozawa Y, Yamazaki K, Hironaka S, Boku N: Tolerability and safety of oral neratinib (HKI-272) in Japanese patients with advanced solid tumors. J Clin Oncol; 2009 May 20;27(15_suppl):e14505

  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] Tolerability and safety of oral neratinib (HKI-272) in Japanese patients with advanced solid tumors.
  • In non-Japanese pts, neratinib was found to have clinical activity against solid tumors and dose-limiting toxicity (DLT) of diarrhea.
  • In this phase 1 study, the MTD was determined and safety and preliminary efficacy were assessed in Japanese pts with advanced solid tumors.
  • Tumor measurements were made at screening and at the end of every 8 weeks (2 cycles) by RECIST.
  • Tumor types at primary diagnosis were advanced colorectal (81%), breast (14%), and gastric (5%) cancer.
  • Two pts had partial response (PR), 8 pts had stable disease (SD) ≥8 wks, 2 had SD≥16 wks, 9 had progressive disease.
  • The 2 pts with PR had ErbB-2+ advanced breast cancer.
  • Neratinib is tolerable and demonstrates preliminary antitumor activity in pts with solid tumors.

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  • (PMID = 27963540.001).
  • [ISSN] 1527-7755
  • [Journal-full-title] Journal of clinical oncology : official journal of the American Society of Clinical Oncology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] J. Clin. Oncol.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] United States
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69. Chow L, Jiang Z, Epstein R, Bondarenko I, Awada A, Coughlin C, Gauthier E, Zhao Y, Abbas R, Hershman D: Safety and efficacy of neratinib (HKI-272) in combination with paclitaxel in patients with solid tumors. J Clin Oncol; 2009 May 20;27(15_suppl):3557

  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] Safety and efficacy of neratinib (HKI-272) in combination with paclitaxel in patients with solid tumors.
  • In this phase 1 study, a combination dose of neratinib plus paclitaxel that is tolerable was determined in patients (pts) with solid tumors, and safety and preliminary efficacy were assessed in pts with erbB-2+ metastatic breast cancer.
  • Pts with solid tumors and pts with only metastatic erbB-2+ breast cancer are enrolled in part 1 and 2, respectively.
  • Tumor measurements were made at screening and at every 8 weeks (2 cycles) by modified RECIST criteria.
  • Tumor types in part 1 included breast, endometrial, cervical, colorectal and esophageal cancer.
  • In 35 efficacy evaluable pts, 5 had confirmed partial response (PR).
  • Confirmed clinical benefit (PR and prolonged disease stabilization) was seen in 2 pts in part 1, 1 pt with endometrial cancer and 1 pt with cervical cancer.
  • CONCLUSIONS: This combination of 240 mg neratinib and 80 mg/m<sup>2</sup> paclitaxel was tolerable with a toxicity profile similar to that observed for neratinib, and had promising antitumor activity in pts with solid tumors and erbB-2 + breast cancer.

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  • (PMID = 27961361.001).
  • [ISSN] 1527-7755
  • [Journal-full-title] Journal of clinical oncology : official journal of the American Society of Clinical Oncology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] J. Clin. Oncol.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] United States
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70. Rosen PJ, Gordon M, Lee PN, Sausville E, Papadopoulos KP, Wong AF, Vallone M, Kunkel L, Infante J, Burris HA 3rd: Phase II results of Study PX-171-007: A phase Ib/II study of carfilzomib (CFZ), a selective proteasome inhibitor, in patients with selected advanced metastatic solid tumors. J Clin Oncol; 2009 May 20;27(15_suppl):3515

  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] Phase II results of Study PX-171-007: A phase Ib/II study of carfilzomib (CFZ), a selective proteasome inhibitor, in patients with selected advanced metastatic solid tumors.
  • This phase 1/2 study assessed the maximum tolerated dose (MTD), safety, efficacy, pharmacokinetics (PK), and pharmacodynamics (PD) of CFZ in patients (pts) with advanced metastatic solid tumors.
  • Phase 2 is designed as a Simon 2 stage of 70 pts split into 5 subgroups (small cell lung [SCLC], non-small cell lung [NSCLC], ovarian, renal, and other cancer).
  • Tumor response was measured every 2 C.
  • ORR, defined as CR+PR+SD, to 16 wks of CFZ.
  • Stage 2 will open if a 1 PR or better at 16 wks occurs in a selected subgroup.
  • CONCLUSIONS: CFZ is active as a single agent in relapsed solid tumors demonstrating PR in both renal and SCLC; and SD >16 wks in mesothelioma, ovarian, renal and NSCLC.

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  • (PMID = 27961301.001).
  • [ISSN] 1527-7755
  • [Journal-full-title] Journal of clinical oncology : official journal of the American Society of Clinical Oncology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] J. Clin. Oncol.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] United States
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71. Carroll PA, Healy L, Lysaght J, Griffin M, Dunne B, Boyle MT, Reynolds JV, Kennedy MJ, Pidgeon G, Connolly EM: Mammary adipose tissue and cancer cell growth: The role of adipose tissue in the tumor microenvironment. J Clin Oncol; 2009 May 20;27(15_suppl):e22009

  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] Mammary adipose tissue and cancer cell growth: The role of adipose tissue in the tumor microenvironment.
  • Adipose tissue is considered an important endocrine organ producing several important hormones and cytokines including leptin and adiponectin.
  • Mechanisms for the role of obesity in cancer states includes the excess or unregulated secretion of adipocytokines from adipose tissue, and potentially the metabolic syndrome (a cluster of co-morbidities linked to metabolic dysregulation).
  • Mammary adipose tissue is proposed to play a vital role in the microenvironment of normal and tumour states within the breast<sup>2</sup>.
  • METHODS: Peritumoural (PT) adipose tissue adjacent to the tumour and distal adipose tissue (D) within the breast was sampled in 10 patients.
  • RESULTS: ACM from both sites promoted tumour cell survival.
  • This may be mediated through increased pro-inflammatory or pro- mitogenic adipocytokine production in adipose tissue surrounding tumour.
  • Further analysis will determine what role obesity and the metabolic syndrome plays in the results noted.

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  • (PMID = 27963182.001).
  • [ISSN] 1527-7755
  • [Journal-full-title] Journal of clinical oncology : official journal of the American Society of Clinical Oncology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] J. Clin. Oncol.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] United States
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72. Saliba A, Saias L, Bidard F, Mathiot C, Saada V, Farace F, Vielh P, Pierga J, Viovy J: Microfluidic device for circulating tumor cell sorting, characterization, and culture. J Clin Oncol; 2009 May 20;27(15_suppl):11068

  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] Microfluidic device for circulating tumor cell sorting, characterization, and culture.
  • : 11068 Background: Circulating tumor cell (CTC) analysis is a promising approach to further characterize the tumor biology and the metastatic process, but has immediate clinical applications such as early predictive markers of response to chemotherapy.
  • Microfluidic techniques offer new exciting perspectives in the field of cell sorting for CTC analysis.
  • METHODS: We propose here a new microfluidic system and strategy allowing the sorting of cells, their study by confoncal fluorescent microscopy and/or their subsequent culture.
  • RESULTS: Using B and T lymphocytes mixtures as a model biological system, the capture yield was better than 90%, and the specificity better than 97%.
  • In clinics, immunophenotyping of circulating malignant B cells was performed using fluorescent confocal microscopy, and was successfully compared to flow cytometry data for each sample.
  • CONCLUSIONS: This new system is a promising approach for efficient CTC sorting, analysis and culture in a completely integrated manner.

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  • (PMID = 27963145.001).
  • [ISSN] 1527-7755
  • [Journal-full-title] Journal of clinical oncology : official journal of the American Society of Clinical Oncology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] J. Clin. Oncol.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] United States
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73. Stearns V, Jacobs LK, Tsangaris TN, Briest S, Lange JR, Slater S, Fackler M, Sugar E, Gabrielson E, Davidson NE: A pilot study evaluating surrogates of response to short-term vorinostat in women with newly diagnosed breast cancer. J Clin Oncol; 2009 May 20;27(15_suppl):e14508

  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • : e14508 Background: Epigenetic modifications contribute to breast cancer initiation and progression and may be reversible, thus representing an attractive area for new drug investigation.
  • Baseline and post-treatment tumor specimens were collected for analysis of histone acetylation, candidate gene methylation and expression.
  • Median age was 55 and 80% had hormone receptor positive tumors.

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  • (PMID = 27963537.001).
  • [ISSN] 1527-7755
  • [Journal-full-title] Journal of clinical oncology : official journal of the American Society of Clinical Oncology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] J. Clin. Oncol.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] United States
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74. Hidalgo M, Garrido-Laguna I, Uson M, De Oliveira E, Schulick R, Hruban RH, Maitra A, Jimeno A, Rubio-Viqueira B, Rajeshkumar NV: Activity of gemcitabine in direct patient-derived xenografts and clinical outcome: Validation of an in vivo model for drug development. J Clin Oncol; 2009 May 20;27(15_suppl):4528

  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • Xenografted tumors were treated with gemcitabine and the activity in the xenograft correlated with patient clinical outcome.
  • Patients whose carcinomas engrafted had a shorter median overall survival (319 vs. 728 days, p=0.002), probably reflecting a more aggressive tumor biology in the engrafted group.
  • The response rate of gemcitabine in xenografts based on RECIST criteria was 8% (similar to response rate to gemcitabine in phase III trial by Moore et al.).
  • In the adjuvant setting, the median disease free survival (DFS) was significantly longer in those patients predicted as sensitive by the xenograft model (568 vs. 286 days, p=0.037).

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  • (PMID = 27962716.001).
  • [ISSN] 1527-7755
  • [Journal-full-title] Journal of clinical oncology : official journal of the American Society of Clinical Oncology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] J. Clin. Oncol.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] United States
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75. de Jong D, Dodge JE, Freedman O, Lo E, Rosen BP, Mackay H: Predictors for optimal cytoreduction following neoadjuvant chemotherapy in advanced epithelial ovarian carcinoma. J Clin Oncol; 2009 May 20;27(15_suppl):5512

  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • DS following NAC offers a survival benefit to those pts in whom optimal cytoreduction (< 1 cm residual tumor) is achieved.
  • Pts with synchronous primary tumors or final pathology inconsistent with EOC were excluded.

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  • (PMID = 27962464.001).
  • [ISSN] 1527-7755
  • [Journal-full-title] Journal of clinical oncology : official journal of the American Society of Clinical Oncology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] J. Clin. Oncol.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] United States
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76. Hörl WH: Tumor lysis syndrome: risk factors and treatment. Wien Klin Wochenschr; 2005 Jan;117(1-2):7-17

  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] Tumor lysis syndrome: risk factors and treatment.
  • [Transliterated title] Tumorlysesyndrom: Risikofaktoren und Therapie.
  • : Tumor lysis syndrome is a typical oncological complication, characterized by hyperuricemia, hyperkalemia, hyperphosphatemia with secondary hypocalcemia, acidosis and acute renal failure.
  • Patients with solid tumors rarely develop a tumor lysis syndrome during anti-neoplastic therapy (chemo-, hormonal-, steroid therapy, radiotherapy).
  • Host-related (e.g. pre-existing volume depletion, hyperuricemia, acidic urine) and tumor-related (e.g. large tumor burden, tumor sensitivity to therapy, advanced stage) risk factors contribute markedly to the development of tumor lysis syndrome.
  • Prophylaxis and treatment of tumor lysis syndrome consist of adequate hydration of the patients (3 l fluid/m<sup>2</sup>/day) in order to maintain urine production of ≥100 ml/h, controlled alkalinisation (urine pH 7.0-7.5) and, if necessary, extracorporeal therapy (intermittent or continuous hemodialysis or hemodiafiltration).
  • Treatment with rasburicase (0.1-0.2 mg/kg for 1-7 days) does not only markedly reduce the incidence of tumor lysis syndrome in patients with malignancy but also morbidity and mortality.

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  • (PMID = 28124165.001).
  • [ISSN] 1613-7671
  • [Journal-full-title] Wiener klinische Wochenschrift
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Wien. Klin. Wochenschr.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] Austria
  • [Keywords] NOTNLM ; Acute renal failure / Allopurinol / Hyperkalemia / Hyperphosphatemia / Hyperuricemia / Rasburicase / Tumor lysis syndrome
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77. Liu C, Liu Y, Chen D, Tang Z, Pan W, Wery J, Chen Y: Establishment of human primary non-small cell lung cancer xenograft models for test of cytotoxic and targeted anticancer drugs. J Clin Oncol; 2009 May 20;27(15_suppl):11008

  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] Establishment of human primary non-small cell lung cancer xenograft models for test of cytotoxic and targeted anticancer drugs.
  • : 11008 Background: New oncology drug development has moved from general cytotoxic agents to molecular target-directed therapeutics.
  • Consequently, there is a need to identify tumor types and individual patient tumors that express the target and could benefit from more selective therapies in clinical trials.
  • Therefore, the in vivo models used in preclinical development should be"disease-oriented" and target-directed.
  • Recently, we developed non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) xenograft models by transplanting human fresh tumor fragments into nude mice, which have been used for test of cytotoxic and targeted anticancer drugs.
  • METHODS: The fresh NSCLC tumors were collected from local hospitals.
  • The tumor fragments were subcutaneously implanted into nude mice.
  • The EGFR and K-ras mutation status of the tumors were investigated and compared with the efficacy results.
  • The test drugs included paclitaxel, gemcitabine, and the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) inhibitor erlotinib.
  • RESULTS: A total of 72 NSCLC samples were implanted, and 13 tumor models were established (tumor taking rate 18%) for the first passage.
  • The tumor taking rates were higher in the second and third passages (80-100%).
  • Paclitaxel and gemcitatbine produced tumor growth inhibition rates of 50-53% regardless of the EGFR and K-ras mutation status.
  • While erlotinib demonstrated a significant antitumor activity only in the tumors bearing EGFR mutation with wild-type K-ras, which were consistent with their clinical findings.
  • The tumor xenografts' architecture, the cell and histopathological morphology from the three generations mirrored the original patient cancers.
  • CONCLUSIONS: These results suggest that human primary tumor xenograft models provide a unique renewable source of tumor material for test of novel anticancer agents.
  • They may predict more relevant clinical response rates and higher correlation with clinical findings than use of xenograft models established from long-term cultured cancer cell lines, especially for test of target-oriented therapeutics in new drugs development programs.

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  • (PMID = 27964039.001).
  • [ISSN] 1527-7755
  • [Journal-full-title] Journal of clinical oncology : official journal of the American Society of Clinical Oncology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] J. Clin. Oncol.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] United States
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78. Iyengar T, Tran NL, Armstrong BA, Berens ME: Candidate treatments of brain metastases suggested fromin silico gene expression analysis of archival primary breast tumor tissue and brain metastases (BM). J Clin Oncol; 2009 May 20;27(15_suppl):e22203

  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] Candidate treatments of brain metastases suggested fromin silico gene expression analysis of archival primary breast tumor tissue and brain metastases (BM).
  • Interestingly, there are times when systemic disease is well controlled but progression continues within the central nervous system (CNS).
  • We identified a set of tissue samples and compared gene expression arrays from 4 separate BM specimens to 7 primary breast cancer specimens; all specimens were Her-2 neu +/ER - tumors except one (information unavailable).
  • RESULTS: Analysis of the gene expression profiles revealed several gene candidates over expressed in the BM specimens as compared to primary tumor specimens.
  • Of interest are the motility-associated genes (ICAM1, cortactin, DOCK11, and myosin; p<0.03), pro-survival gene (AKT3; p<0.03), the FGF-growth factor signaling pathway (FGF1; p<0.02), and genes positively regulating the epithelial-to-mesenchymal transformation (EMT) process [TGFB1, SNAI2 (SLUG), NOTCH2; p<0.03].
  • Our findings argue for gene expression analysis on a larger number of BM specimens for discovery and validation of gene candidates important for this malignant progression.

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  • (PMID = 27964132.001).
  • [ISSN] 1527-7755
  • [Journal-full-title] Journal of clinical oncology : official journal of the American Society of Clinical Oncology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] J. Clin. Oncol.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] United States
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79. Hameed S, Jamshed A, Hussain R, Ali M, Iqbal H, Majeed U, Shah MA: Neoadjuvant chemotherapy followed by radiotherapy or chemoradiation for locally advanced nasal and paranasal sinus tumors. J Clin Oncol; 2009 May 20;27(15_suppl):6055

  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] Neoadjuvant chemotherapy followed by radiotherapy or chemoradiation for locally advanced nasal and paranasal sinus tumors.
  • : 6055 Background: The treatment of locally advanced nasal and paranasal sinus tumors is controversial.
  • The disease is chemosensitive and there is increasing interest in the use of chemotherapy with radiation in this group of patients.
  • Our aim was to determine survival in patients with locally advanced nasal and paranasal sinus tumors treated with neoadjuvant chemotherapy followed by radiotherapy or chemoradiation (RT/CRT).
  • METHODS: Between August 2005 and August 2008, 21 patients with AJCC stage III or IV nasal and paranasal sinus tumors were treated with neoadjuvant chemotherapy followed by RT/CRT in our institution.
  • Site of disease was nasal cavity 33% (7), ethamoid sinus 43% (9), maxillary antrum 19% (4), and frontal sinus in 5% (1) of patients.
  • Following RT/CRT 86% (18/21) had complete regression of disease.
  • Disease free and overall survival at 40 months was 52% and 63%, respectively.
  • CONCLUSIONS: Gemcitabine cisplatin chemotherapy has good activity in nasal and paranasal sinus tumors.

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  • (PMID = 27961932.001).
  • [ISSN] 1527-7755
  • [Journal-full-title] Journal of clinical oncology : official journal of the American Society of Clinical Oncology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] J. Clin. Oncol.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] United States
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80. Mitsiades N, Schultz N, Taylor BS, Hieronymus H, Satagopan J, Scardino PT, Reuter VE, Sander C, Sawyers C, Scher HI, Prostate Cancer Genome Project Group: Increased expression of androgen receptor (AR) and enzymes involved in androgen synthesis in metastatic prostate cancer: Targets for novel personalized therapies. J Clin Oncol; 2009 May 20;27(15_suppl):5002

  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • For individual tumors, a transcript was considered to be overexpressed or underexpressed when its levels were >2 SDs higher or lower, respectively, than its average levels in normal tissue.
  • RESULTS: Metastatic PCas expressed higher average transcript levels for AR and several steroidogenic enzymes, including SRD5A1 and SRD5A3, than primary PCas and normal prostate tissue.
  • Expression of SRD5A2, CYP3A4, CYP3A5, and CYP3A7 mRNAs was decreased both in primary and metastatic tumors compared to normal prostate tissue.
  • In analysis involving AR and 28 steroidogenic transcripts in individual tumors, all (16/16) metastatic PCas overexpressed at least one transcript (range: 2-14, median: 5 transcripts) compared to normal tissue, while 100/131 (76%) primary PCas overexpressed at least one transcript (range: 2-16, median: 2).
  • Overexpression of AR or steroidogenic enzymes may serve as a biomarker (e.g. by detection via RT-PCR in circulating tumor cells) to predict for sensitivity to these agents and guide patient selection for participation in clinical trials.

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  • (PMID = 27962896.001).
  • [ISSN] 1527-7755
  • [Journal-full-title] Journal of clinical oncology : official journal of the American Society of Clinical Oncology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] J. Clin. Oncol.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] United States
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81. Pusztai L, Rouzier R, Pusztai L, Ibrahim N: A specific nomogram to predict subsequent brain metastasis in metastatic triple-negative breast cancer patients. J Clin Oncol; 2009 May 20;27(15_suppl):1028

  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • : 1028 Background: The development of brain metastases is usually a fatal event in the history of breast cancer patients with metastatic disease other than brain (MDOB).
  • We hypothesized that a nomogram specific to triple negative tumor (TN) could improve prediction BM occurrence in patients with MDOB, thus allowing allocation of preventive treatment more efficiently.
  • We tested 17 variables and developed a multivariate model to predict occurrence of subsequent BM in TN tumors and created a nomogram that could be used for individual prediction.
  • RESULTS: Among 2,136 patients with metastatic breast cancer including 641 patients with TN tumors, 362 developed BM during follow-up: young age, histological characteristics, short delay between initial diagnosis and MDOB, number of metastatic sites and initial number of metastatic nodes were significantly and independently associated with subsequent BM.
  • The nomogram to predict BM developed on the TN population provided a better discrimination (area under the ROC curve [AUC] = 0.62) than the global nomogram (AUC = 0.58) for the TN tumors.

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  • (PMID = 27961039.001).
  • [ISSN] 1527-7755
  • [Journal-full-title] Journal of clinical oncology : official journal of the American Society of Clinical Oncology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] J. Clin. Oncol.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] United States
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82. Grimley PM, Matsuno R, Anderson WF: Population profiles of extra-ovarian and ovarian serous adenocarcinomas: Comparisons with grade stratification. J Clin Oncol; 2009 May 20;27(15_suppl):e16506

  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • : e16506 Background: Molecular studies of ovarian serous adenocarcinomas (OSC) have linked distinct patterns of gene expression or mutations to high or low tumor grade.
  • RESULTS: We observed trend interactions by grade for OSC, PSC, and FSC (p < 0.001); age-adjusted incidence rates rose more rapidly for high than low grade tumors over time.
  • ASIR for OSC/PSC were higher for low than high grade tumors prior to age 40 years, after which rates became higher for high grade (p < 0.001 for age interaction by grade).
  • Actuarial cancer-specific cumulative survival was worse for high than low grade tumors (all anatomic sites).

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  • (PMID = 27960765.001).
  • [ISSN] 1527-7755
  • [Journal-full-title] Journal of clinical oncology : official journal of the American Society of Clinical Oncology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] J. Clin. Oncol.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] United States
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83. Malogolowkin MH, Krailo M, Frazier LA, Olson TA: Study of cisplatin, etoposide, bleomycin, and escalating dose cyclophosphamide therapy for children with high-risk germ cell tumors: A Children's Oncology Group report. J Clin Oncol; 2009 May 20;27(15_suppl):10035

  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] Study of cisplatin, etoposide, bleomycin, and escalating dose cyclophosphamide therapy for children with high-risk germ cell tumors: A Children's Oncology Group report.
  • : 10035 Background: In the intergroup high-risk germ cell tumors (HR-GCT) study (CCG-8882/POG-9049) patients with extragonadal GCT treated with high-dose cisplatin, etoposide, and bleomycin (HD-PEB) had a 2 year-EFS of 84% versus 74% for those treated with standard PEB (PEB), suggesting that treatment intensification might be beneficial.
  • DLT was defined as any grade 4 non-hematologic toxicity other than nausea and vomiting, fever and infection, and any non-hematologic grade 3 toxicity which had not reversed (< grade 2) within 28 days of treatment; or hematologic toxicity grade 3 or 4, which despite hematopoietic growth factor support, was not reversible within 28 days of treatment.
  • Fifteen of the 19 patients were removed from protocol therapy after 4 cycles of therapy; 11 were disease-free, 2 electively terminated protocol therapy, 1 patient was lost to follow-up, and 1 had progressive disease (PD).
  • Four patients received 2 more cycles of C-PEB, of these 3 were disease-free and 1 had PD.

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  • (PMID = 27962582.001).
  • [ISSN] 1527-7755
  • [Journal-full-title] Journal of clinical oncology : official journal of the American Society of Clinical Oncology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] J. Clin. Oncol.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] United States
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84. Waqar SN, Gao F, Govindan R, Morgensztern D: Prognostic significance of tumor size in patients with stage III non-small cell lung cancer: A SEER database survey. J Clin Oncol; 2009 May 20;27(15_suppl):7529

  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] Prognostic significance of tumor size in patients with stage III non-small cell lung cancer: A SEER database survey.
  • : 7529 Background: Although tumor size is a known predictor of stage I and II non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) treated with surgery or radiotherapy, there is limited information regarding its prognostic significance in patients with mediastinal lymph node involvement.
  • METHODS: The Surveillance Epidemiology and End Results (SEER) registry was queried for patients with unresected NSCLC stage III, without malignant pleural effusion, aged 21 or older, and diagnosed between 1998 and 2003.
  • Tumor size was defined as S1 (0.1-3 cm), S2 (3.1-5 cm), S3 (5.1-7 cm) and S4 (7.1-20 cm).
  • The Kaplan-Meier method was used to estimate the overall survival (OS) and disease-specific survival (DSS), and the Cox proportional hazard model to evaluate whether tumor size remained an independent risk factor after adjusting for stage and other demographic variables.
  • Tumor size was a statistically significant predictor for both overall survival (p<0.0001) and disease-specific survival (p<0.0001) on multivariate analysis.
  • Selected groups of patients with smaller stage IIIB disease had better OS compared to patients with stage IIIA, including; IIIBS1 vs. IIIAS3 (p=0.0005) or IIIA S4 (p<0.0001) and IIIBS2 vs. IIIAS4 (p=0.0001).
  • CONCLUSIONS: Tumor size is an independent predictor for OS and DSS in patients with unresected stage III NSCLC and should be considered in the stratification of patients treated in this setting.

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  • (PMID = 27963296.001).
  • [ISSN] 1527-7755
  • [Journal-full-title] Journal of clinical oncology : official journal of the American Society of Clinical Oncology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] J. Clin. Oncol.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] United States
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85. Olofsson S, Dahl O, Jerkeman M, Cohn-Cedermark G, Klepp O, Stierner U, Törnblom M, Wahlqvist R, Cavallin-Ståhl E, SWENOTECA: Individualized intensification of treatment based on tumor marker decline in metastatic nonseminomatous germ cell testicular cancer (NSGCT): A report from the Swedish Norwegian Testicular Cancer Group, SWENOTECA. J Clin Oncol; 2009 May 20;27(15_suppl):5015

  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] Individualized intensification of treatment based on tumor marker decline in metastatic nonseminomatous germ cell testicular cancer (NSGCT): A report from the Swedish Norwegian Testicular Cancer Group, SWENOTECA.
  • Tumor markers were analyzed once a week during treatment.
  • CONCLUSIONS: Our results, in a population based patient material, with individualized treatment based on tumor marker decline, are highly encouraging in all risk groups, but most notably in the intermediate risk group.

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  • (PMID = 27962902.001).
  • [ISSN] 1527-7755
  • [Journal-full-title] Journal of clinical oncology : official journal of the American Society of Clinical Oncology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] J. Clin. Oncol.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] United States
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86. Amato R, Hernandez-McClain J, Harrop R, Cen P, Doshi G: Vaccination of renal cell cancer (RCC) patients with modified vaccinia Ankara (MVA) delivering tumor antigen 5T4 administered alone or with interleukin 2 (IL-2) or interferon-alpha (IFN). J Clin Oncol; 2009 May 20;27(15_suppl):3026

  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] Vaccination of renal cell cancer (RCC) patients with modified vaccinia Ankara (MVA) delivering tumor antigen 5T4 administered alone or with interleukin 2 (IL-2) or interferon-alpha (IFN).
  • : 3026 Background: The attenuated vaccinia virus (MVA) has been engineered to deliver the tumor antigen 5T4 (TroVax).
  • Clinical responses were assessed by measuring changes in tumor burden via computed tomography or magnetic resonance imaging scan.
  • 20 pts demonstrated disease stabilization for ≥ 3 months.

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  • (PMID = 27962068.001).
  • [ISSN] 1527-7755
  • [Journal-full-title] Journal of clinical oncology : official journal of the American Society of Clinical Oncology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] J. Clin. Oncol.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] United States
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87. Gomez Rangel J Sr, Alvarez Ordorica O, Villalobos Valencia R, Silva JA: Utility of concomitant chemoradiotherapy with 5-fluorouracil (5-FU) single agent as neoadjuvant treatment regimen in mexican patients with stage III rectal cancer: Experience in the Oncology Hospital. J Clin Oncol; 2009 May 20;27(15_suppl):e15144

  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] Utility of concomitant chemoradiotherapy with 5-fluorouracil (5-FU) single agent as neoadjuvant treatment regimen in mexican patients with stage III rectal cancer: Experience in the Oncology Hospital.
  • : e15144 Background: To analyze overall survival, free disease survival, complete and partial pathologic response, effect of stage reduction, toxicity profile and number of anus preservative surgery in patients treated with concurrent chemo radiotherapy with a modified 5-FU single agent regimen as neoadjuvant modality treatment.
  • METHODS: Historic Cohort of patients treated in the Oncology Hospital, CMNSXXI between January 1999 to December 2004.
  • The five years of overall survival was 62% and the five-years of disease free survival was 55%.
  • Results in OS, DFS and number of complete pathological response were similar to reported by another oncology groups.

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  • (PMID = 27960884.001).
  • [ISSN] 1527-7755
  • [Journal-full-title] Journal of clinical oncology : official journal of the American Society of Clinical Oncology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] J. Clin. Oncol.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] United States
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88. Gupta N, Diderichsen PM, Steinberg J, Ricker JL, Humerickhouse R, Awni W, Pradhan R: Population pharmacokinetic (PK) analysis of ABT-869 in solid tumors and acute myelogenous leukemia (AML) patients. J Clin Oncol; 2009 May 20;27(15_suppl):3567

  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] Population pharmacokinetic (PK) analysis of ABT-869 in solid tumors and acute myelogenous leukemia (AML) patients.
  • : 3567 Background: ABT-869 is an orally bioavailable, potent and specific inhibitor of all vascular endothelial growth factor and platelet derived growth factor family receptor tyrosine kinases.
  • The objectives of this analysis were to understand the population pharmacokinetics of ABT-869 and explore the effect of several demographic/disease state covariates influencing ABT-869 disposition.
  • METHODS: A population PK analysis of 181 patients (pts) enrolled in two phase 1 (multiple types of solid tumors and AML) and three phase 2 monotherapy studies (non-small cell lung cancer, hepatocellular carcinoma [HCC] and renal cell carcinoma) was conducted.
  • Available plasma concentrations obtained after intensive and sparse pre-dose PK sampling were analyzed by population PK using the non linear mixed effects modeling (NONMEM) approach.
  • Potential covariates including body weight, body surface area (BSA), age, sex, creatinine clearance (CrCL) and disease state (HCC vs. non-HCC pts) were tested.
  • HCC pts had ∼40% lower CL/F values than pts with other malignancies suggesting a lower dose would be appropriate for HCC (Child Pugh A and B) pts.

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  • (PMID = 27961681.001).
  • [ISSN] 1527-7755
  • [Journal-full-title] Journal of clinical oncology : official journal of the American Society of Clinical Oncology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] J. Clin. Oncol.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] United States
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89. Kim J, Cha Y, Han S, Oh D, Lee S, Kim D, Im S, Kim T, Heo DS, Bang Y: Prospective evaluation of oral mucositis in solid tumor patients undergoing chemotherapy and its clinical implication. J Clin Oncol; 2009 May 20;27(15_suppl):e20650

  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] Prospective evaluation of oral mucositis in solid tumor patients undergoing chemotherapy and its clinical implication.
  • : e20650 Background: Oral mucositis (OM) induced by chemotherapy is a troublesome and debilitating adverse effect in solid tumor patients.
  • Therefore we prospectively evaluated the actual incidence of OM and its clinical significance in solid tumor patients.
  • METHODS: From October 16, 2007 to September 3, 2008, we consecutively enrolled 344 patients with solid tumor who initiated new chemotherapy.
  • CONCLUSIONS: Forty five percent of patients with solid tumor experience OM during 2 cycles of chemotherapy.

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  • (PMID = 27961631.001).
  • [ISSN] 1527-7755
  • [Journal-full-title] Journal of clinical oncology : official journal of the American Society of Clinical Oncology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] J. Clin. Oncol.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] United States
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90. Wenzel C, Locker GJ, Bartsch R, Pluschnig U, Hussian D, Zielinski CC, Rudas M, Gnant MF, Jakesz R, Steger GG: Preoperative second-line chemotherapy induces objective responses in primary breast cancer. Wien Klin Wochenschr; 2005 Jan;117(1-2):48-52

  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • Tumors of patients with histologically proven breast cancer that fail to respond to preoperative chemotherapy are thought to be chemotherapy resistant.
  • RESULTS: A major response to treatment was observed in 10 of 13 patients (77%) during preoperative second-line therapy: one patient (8%) achieved pathological complete response (pCR) and nine patients (69%) partial response (PR).
  • Three patients (23%) had stable disease (SD), and no patient had progressive disease (PD).
  • CONCLUSIONS: We conclude that it is possible to achieve objective responses including pCR with potentially non-cross-resistant neoadjuvant second-line therapy, leading to breast-conserving surgery in a high proportion of patients.

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  • (PMID = 28124172.001).
  • [ISSN] 1613-7671
  • [Journal-full-title] Wiener klinische Wochenschrift
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Wien. Klin. Wochenschr.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] Austria
  • [Keywords] NOTNLM ; Breast cancer / Breast conservation / HER2 status / Neoadjuvant second-line chemotherapy
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91. Oldenhuis C, Dijkers EC, Duiker EW, Fox NL, Klein JL, Gietema JA, Brouwers AH, Lub-de Hooge MN, de Vries EG: Development of radiolabeled mapatumumab and imaging in solid tumor patients who are treated with gemcitabine, cisplatin, and mapatumumab. J Clin Oncol; 2009 May 20;27(15_suppl):e14521

  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] Development of radiolabeled mapatumumab and imaging in solid tumor patients who are treated with gemcitabine, cisplatin, and mapatumumab.
  • : e14521 Background: Mapatumumab is a fully human agonistic monoclonal antibody (mAb) to the tumor necrosis factor-related apoptosis-inducing ligand receptor 1 (TRAIL-R1).
  • In a feasibility study, gemcitabine 1250 mg/m<sup>2</sup> IV on days 1 and 8, cisplatin 80 mg/m<sup>2</sup> IV and mapatumumab 20 mg/kg on day 1 was administered to advanced solid tumor pts every 21 days.
  • <sup>111</sup>In-mapatumumab was stable in serum for 1 week at 37°C and specific TRAIL-R1 binding was maintained after labeling.
  • Known tumor lesions (by CT-scan) showed variable tracer uptake in 3 pts, while within pts not all known tumor lesions were positive on SPECT.
  • Preliminary results show that mapatumumab scintigraphy identifies some but not all tumor lesions in pts.
  • This is the first demonstration that mAb targeting a TRAIL-R distributes to tumor tissues in patients and could potentially guide mapatumumab therapy.

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  • (PMID = 27963569.001).
  • [ISSN] 1527-7755
  • [Journal-full-title] Journal of clinical oncology : official journal of the American Society of Clinical Oncology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] J. Clin. Oncol.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] United States
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92. Hinkel JM, Vandergrift JL, Perkel SJ, Waldinger Mhsa MB, Levy Pa-C W, Stewart FM: The impact of midlevel providers on productivity in outpatient oncology clinics at National Comprehensive Cancer Network (NCCN) institutions. J Clin Oncol; 2009 May 20;27(15_suppl):6628

  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] The impact of midlevel providers on productivity in outpatient oncology clinics at National Comprehensive Cancer Network (NCCN) institutions.
  • However, no methods currently exist to assess the impact of PA/NPs as physician extenders in an oncology setting.
  • NCCN developed a survey to evaluate the use of PA/NPs in cancer centers and to pilot test PA/NP productivity metrics in outpatient oncology clinics.
  • PA/NP outpatient clinic productivity was measured as the average number of new and follow-up patients seen per half-day clinic (patients per clinic, PPC).
  • Most responding PA/NPs listed their primary specialty as medical oncology (MO, 34%), followed by hematologic malignancies/BMT (HM/BMT, 28%) and surgical oncology (SO, 23%).
  • However, more experienced HM/BMT NPs were more productive with new patients (r<sub>s</sub> = 0.46, p = 0.03).
  • CONCLUSIONS: Mid-level providers have a measurable impact on productivity in outpatient oncology clinics.
  • Refining productivity metrics for PAs/NPs will help inform workforce projections and staffing decisions for oncology practices/specialists and cancer centers, especially in the face of future physician shortages.

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  • (PMID = 27961806.001).
  • [ISSN] 1527-7755
  • [Journal-full-title] Journal of clinical oncology : official journal of the American Society of Clinical Oncology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] J. Clin. Oncol.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] United States
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93. Wood L, Garcia JA, Elson P, Salas RN, Lane BR, Klein E, Stephenson A, Dreicer R, Campbell SC, Rini BI: Sunitinib in patients (pts) with unresectable primary renal cell carcinoma (RCC). J Clin Oncol; 2009 May 20;27(15_suppl):5096

  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • : 5096 Background: Sunitinib inhibits VEGF and related receptors, with high tumor shrinkage rates in metastatic (met) RCC.
  • Shrinkage of primary tumors has been observed, although prospective investigation is lacking.
  • The ability of sunitinib to convert primary RCC tumors from unresectable to resectable is of high clinical interest.
  • METHODS: Pts with histologically-confirmed RCC with an unresectable primary tumor with or without met disease were enrolled on a single-arm phase II trial.
  • Primary tumors were unresectable due to ≥ 1 of the following: large tumor size, bulky lymphadenopathy, encasement of renal vessels, IVC thrombosis or proximity to vital structures.
  • RESULTS: 18 pts have been enrolled; 1 excluded due to a non-RCC diagnosis.
  • Pts were unresectable due to bulky lymphadenopathy (6), IVC thrombosis (4), proximity to vital structures (4) or tumor size (3), although most pts had multiple factors.
  • Median age among 14 evaluable pts was 61 years (range, 37-80), 59% male, 76% ECOG PS 0; 79% had distant met disease.
  • Three pts (21%) have undergone primary tumor resection; viable RCC was identified in all specimens with no unexpected surgical morbidity.
  • Nine pts (53%) had primary tumor reduction (median 19%; range, -64% to -1%).
  • Overall, median best % change in tumor burden was 4.9% reduction for primary tumors (range, -43.1% to +8.5%) and 10.7% reduction for met sites (range, -89.5% to +28.6%).
  • Eleven pts (79%) discontinued therapy; 8 for PD, 1 for adverse events and 2 following surgery which removed all visible disease.
  • Eight pts (57%) experienced grade 3 toxicity including thrombocytopenia, fatigue, hypertension, anemia, hemoptysis, and hand-foot syndrome; 1 pt had grade 4 neutropenia.
  • CONCLUSIONS: Sunitinib has activity in unresectable primary RCC tumors, permitting resection in some pts.

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  • (PMID = 27964292.001).
  • [ISSN] 1527-7755
  • [Journal-full-title] Journal of clinical oncology : official journal of the American Society of Clinical Oncology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] J. Clin. Oncol.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] United States
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94. Ordentlich P, Tee L, Huynh Y, Mee S, Mamuszka H, Lee G: Ex-vivo analysis of the isoform selective histone deacetylase inhibitor entinostat in triple-negative breast cancer tumors. J Clin Oncol; 2009 May 20;27(15_suppl):e14597

  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] Ex-vivo analysis of the isoform selective histone deacetylase inhibitor entinostat in triple-negative breast cancer tumors.
  • : e14597 Background: Triple-negative (ER, PR, HER2 negative) breast cancer represents an unmet need for which novel agents and approaches are essential.
  • Entinostat is an orally available, class 1 isoform selective histone deacetylase inhibitor currently in multiple phase 2 clinical studies including advanced NSCLC and breast cancer.
  • Studies in vitro and in vivo in the triple negative cell line model MDA-MB-231 have established single agent activity of entinostat in inhibiting tumor growth as well preventing bone metastases.
  • In addition, entinostat induces expression of ERα in MDA-MB-231 in vivo and is synergistic with endocrine therapy agents to inhibit tumor growth of ER negative cancer cells.
  • The aim of these studies was to confirm the activity of entinostat in triple negative breast cancers using human breast tumor explants.
  • METHODS: Cytotoxicity of entinostat was determined by the Oncotech Extreme Drug Resistance (EDR) proliferation assay using ten cryopreserved breast tumor explants known to lack estrogen receptor, progesterone receptor and HER2/neu expression (i.e.
  • RESULTS: Dose response curves of entinostat were analyzed and compared to paclitaxel at 2.45 μM in ten triple negative breast tumor explants in the EDR assay.
  • Entinostat was broadly effective in all of the tumors tested, with most samples showing dose-dependent response for the range of concentrations analyzed (0.003 - 10 μM).
  • Two of the breast tumors that were most sensitive to entinostat (IC<sub>50</sub> 30- 100nM) were also sensitive to paclitaxel.
  • In contrast, entinostat effectively inhibited (IC<sub>50</sub> 10-270nM) the growth of eight of the tumors that were resistant to paclitaxel (i.e.
  • < 50% growth inhibition).
  • Overall, all breast tumors tested were sensitive to entinostat at clinically achievable concentrations regardless of paclitaxel resistance indicating entinostat may improve the treatment outcome of triple negative breast cancer patients.
  • CONCLUSIONS: Entinostat is an effective agent at inhibiting the growth of triple negative breast tumors with clinically relevant IC<sub>50</sub>'s ranging from 10nM to 270nM.

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  • (PMID = 27963724.001).
  • [ISSN] 1527-7755
  • [Journal-full-title] Journal of clinical oncology : official journal of the American Society of Clinical Oncology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] J. Clin. Oncol.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] United States
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95. Tanaka F, Yoneda K, Hashimoto M, Takuwa T, Matsumoto S, Okumura Y, Kondo N, Hasegawa S, Fukuoka K, Nakano T: Circulating tumor cells (CTCs) and endothelial cells (CECs) in primary lung cancer. J Clin Oncol; 2009 May 20;27(15_suppl):11066

  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] Circulating tumor cells (CTCs) and endothelial cells (CECs) in primary lung cancer.
  • : 11066 Background: Circulating tumor cell (CTC), a surrogate of distant metastasis, and circulating endothelia cell (CEC), a surrogate of angiogenesis, are potentially useful in the diagnosis of malignant tumors, but clinical significance of CTC/CEC in primary lung cancer (LC) remains unclear.
  • In 11 (18.3%) of 145 cases with non-malignant (NM) diseases, CTC was also positive; however, in NM cases, CTC-count was 1 (cell/7.5mL) in most CTC-positive cases and the maximun CTC-count was 2.
  • The mean CEC number (/4.0mL) was significantly higher in LC cases than in NM cases (97.5 versus 52.5, respectively; p=0.023), Among LC cases, the mean CEC significantly increased along with tumor progression (mean CEC for stage I, II, III, and IV cases: 58.7, 57.9, 83.4, and 178.4, respectively; p=0.002).

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  • (PMID = 27963143.001).
  • [ISSN] 1527-7755
  • [Journal-full-title] Journal of clinical oncology : official journal of the American Society of Clinical Oncology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] J. Clin. Oncol.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] United States
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96. Krishnan S, Briere TM, Dong L, Murthy R, Ng C, Balter P, Mohan R, Gillin MT, Beddar AS: Daily targeting of liver tumors: Screening patients with a mock treatment and using a combination of internal and external fiducials for image-guided respiratory-gated radiotherapya). Med Phys; 2007 Dec;34(12):4591-4593

  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] Daily targeting of liver tumors: Screening patients with a mock treatment and using a combination of internal and external fiducials for image-guided respiratory-gated radiotherapya).
  • Radio-opaque fiducials implanted adjacent to the liver tumor were used for online positioning to minimize the systematic error in patient positioning.

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  • [Copyright] © 2007 American Association of Physicists in Medicine.
  • (PMID = 28523816.001).
  • [ISSN] 2473-4209
  • [Journal-full-title] Medical physics
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Med Phys
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] United States
  • [Keywords] NOTNLM ; Cancer / Computed radiography / Computed tomography / Diseases / Drug delivery / Effects of ionizing radiation on biological systems / Gold / Hemodynamics / Image guided radiation therapy / Liver / Medical imaging / Pneumodyamics, respiration / Radiation therapy / Radiation treatment / Therapeutics / cancer / computerised tomography / image-guided radiotherapy / implanted fiducial / liver / mock treatment / pneumodynamics / radiation therapy / respiratory-gated / tumours
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97. Homet B, Hitt R, Ghanem I, Malón D, Cortés-Funes H: The era of oral drugs in oncology: What do patients think about their efectiveness? J Clin Oncol; 2009 May 20;27(15_suppl):e20600

  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] The era of oral drugs in oncology: What do patients think about their efectiveness?
  • Fifty percent had gynaecologic tumors; thirty percent digestive; eighteen percent lung cancer and two percent other tumors, with a median of 3 different lines of therapy (range, 1 to 9).
  • CONCLUSIONS: The constant evolution in cancer therapy and the increasing participation of (pts) in therapeutic decisions makes it imperative to know the opinion of (pts) on these new treatments.

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  • (PMID = 27961560.001).
  • [ISSN] 1527-7755
  • [Journal-full-title] Journal of clinical oncology : official journal of the American Society of Clinical Oncology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] J. Clin. Oncol.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] United States
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98. Gershtein ES, Scherbakov AM, Anurova OA, Krasil'nikov MA, Kushlinsky NE: Phosphorylated Akt1 in human breast cancer measured by direct sandwich enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay: Correlation with clinicopathological features and tumor VEGF-signaling system component levels. Int J Biol Markers; 2006 Jan - Mar;21(1):12-19

  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] Phosphorylated Akt1 in human breast cancer measured by direct sandwich enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay: Correlation with clinicopathological features and tumor VEGF-signaling system component levels.
  • : Protein kinase B (Akt) plays a major role in the regulation of breast cancer growth, survival, hormone, drug and radiosensitivity, but the clinical value of its expression and activation in human tumors is unclear.
  • Forty-nine percent of the tumors had an increased pAkt1 level as compared to adjacent tissue. pAkt1 levels were significantly higher in stage IIb than in stage I-IIa tumors.
  • The frequency of pAkt1 elevation was positively associated with tumor size and malignancy grade. pAkt1 was also twice as frequently increased in PgR-negative as in PgR-positive tumors, while its mean level was significantly higher in ER-positive than in ER-negative tumors.
  • VEGF, sVEGFR1 and sVEGFR2 were increased in 73-85% of the tumors, but no associations with most clinicobiological factors and pAkt1 level were found.
  • In conclusion, activation of Akt1 is not associated with VEGF signaling protein expression in breast cancer but is related to tumor size, grade of malignancy, and steroid receptor status.

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  • (PMID = 28207090.001).
  • [ISSN] 1724-6008
  • [Journal-full-title] The International journal of biological markers
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Int. J. Biol. Markers
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] Italy
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99. Dumont AG, Lev D, Lazar A, Joensuu H, Trent J: Simultaneous gastrointestinal stromal tumor (GIST) and desmoid fibromatosis (DF). J Clin Oncol; 2009 May 20;27(15_suppl):10568

  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] Simultaneous gastrointestinal stromal tumor (GIST) and desmoid fibromatosis (DF).
  • Gastrointestinal Stromal Tumor (GIST) is the most common mesenchymal tumors of the gastrointestinal tract and also rare (15-20 cases per year per million).
  • In 5 cases, the GIST was diagnosed prior to the DF while one case had both tumors synchronous at presentation.

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  • (PMID = 27963790.001).
  • [ISSN] 1527-7755
  • [Journal-full-title] Journal of clinical oncology : official journal of the American Society of Clinical Oncology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] J. Clin. Oncol.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] United States
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100. Cabrera A, Jantus Lewintre E, Sirera R, Honguero A, Gil M, Blasco A, Sanmartin E, Arnau A, Guijarro R, Camps C: Expression of angiogenic genes in resectable non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). J Clin Oncol; 2009 May 20;27(15_suppl):e22207

  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] Expression of angiogenic genes in resectable non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC).
  • It is known that angiogenesis is an essential event for solid tumour growth.
  • Vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) family of ligand and receptors (VEGFR) are described as powerful angiogenic factors.
  • VEGF belongs to a protein family, within which Placental growth factor (PlGF) is a member, they bound to their receptors at the membrane levels, gathering a cascade of intracellular events.
  • RESULTS: Our results show that tumor samples have higher expression of PlGF than normal tissue.
  • We found a significant correlation between the levels of expression of PlGF and the tumor size (p= 0.023, Spearman's test), whereas no relation was found between the expression of the genes and the histology or stage of disease.
  • CONCLUSIONS: Our results reveal that, in NSCLC, PlGF mRNA is higher in tumor than in normal tissue and is positively correlated with the tumor size and with the expression of angiogenic receptors.
  • Theses finding could indicate that PlGF have some role in lung cancer progression and may be a promising new biomarker in NSCLC, but still more investigations are necessary with a larger number of samples.

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  • (PMID = 27964135.001).
  • [ISSN] 1527-7755
  • [Journal-full-title] Journal of clinical oncology : official journal of the American Society of Clinical Oncology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] J. Clin. Oncol.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] United States
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