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1. Gawkowska-Suwinska M, Fijałkowski M, Białas B, Szlag M, Kellas-Ślęczka S, Nowicka E, Behrendt K, Plewicki G, Smolska-Ciszewska B, Giglok M, Zajusz A, Owczarek G: Salvage brachytherapy for local recurrences of prostate cancer treated previously with radiotherapy. J Contemp Brachytherapy; 2009 Dec;1(4):211-215
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  • [Title] Salvage brachytherapy for local recurrences of prostate cancer treated previously with radiotherapy.
  • MATERIAL AND METHODS: In MCS Memorial Institute of Oncology in Gliwice a research programme on salvage HDR brachytherapy for local recurrences of prostate cancer treated previously with EBRT has been ongoing since February 2008.
  • Two patients developed bone metastases.
  • CONCLUSIONS: Salvage brachytherapy for localized prostate cancer (3 × 10 Gy every 14 days) seems to be a safe and well tolerated procedure.
  • A significant decline in prostate-specific antigen (PSA) level is seen in patients with hormone-responsive cancer.

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  • (PMID = 28050174.001).
  • [ISSN] 1689-832X
  • [Journal-full-title] Journal of contemporary brachytherapy
  • [ISO-abbreviation] J Contemp Brachytherapy
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] Poland
  • [Keywords] NOTNLM ; prostate cancer / radiotherapy / recurrences / salvage brachytherapy
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2. Su XC, Wang YL, Yang XY, Liu CL, Yan BC, Kong JX, Song XL, Liang K: [Effect of Guliu capsule combined with 89Sr therapy on metastatic bone tumor]. Di Yi Jun Yi Da Xue Xue Bao; 2005 Sep;25(9):1164-5, 1177
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  • [Title] [Effect of Guliu capsule combined with 89Sr therapy on metastatic bone tumor].
  • OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the therapeutic effects of Guliu capsule (GLC) combined with 89Sr in treating metastatic bone tumors.
  • METHODS: On the basis of random sampling and grouping, 50 patients with metastatic bone tumors were selected to receive combined treatment with GLC and (89)Sr with another 50 patients recruited for (89)Sr treatment alone.
  • The therapeutic effect of the therapies were evaluated according to the relief of ostalgia and quality-of life (QOF), local bone metabolism and hematopoietic function of the bone marrow.
  • The effect of the two treatment protocols on local bone metabolism and their hemotoxicity were also significantly different (P<0.05, P<0.01, respectively).
  • CONCLUSION: Combined treatment with GLC and (89)Sr is effective for metastatic bone tumor and improves the patient's QOF with enhanced ostalgia relief rate and decreased hemotoxicity.
  • [MeSH-major] Bone Neoplasms / radiotherapy. Bone Neoplasms / secondary. Drugs, Chinese Herbal / therapeutic use. Strontium Radioisotopes / therapeutic use

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  • (PMID = 16174589.001).
  • [ISSN] 1000-2588
  • [Journal-full-title] Di 1 jun yi da xue xue bao = Academic journal of the first medical college of PLA
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Di Yi Jun Yi Da Xue Xue Bao
  • [Language] chi
  • [Publication-type] English Abstract; Journal Article; Randomized Controlled Trial; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
  • [Publication-country] China
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Capsules; 0 / Drugs, Chinese Herbal; 0 / Strontium Radioisotopes
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3. Wadas TJ, Deng H, Sprague JE, Zheleznyak A, Weilbaecher KN, Anderson CJ: Targeting the alphavbeta3 integrin for small-animal PET/CT of osteolytic bone metastases. J Nucl Med; 2009 Nov;50(11):1873-80
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  • [Title] Targeting the alphavbeta3 integrin for small-animal PET/CT of osteolytic bone metastases.
  • This article describes the evaluation of the radiopharmaceutical (64)Cu-CB-TE2A-c(RGDyK) ((64)Cu-RGD) as an imaging agent for osteolytic bone metastases and their associated inflammation by targeting of the alpha(v)beta(3) integrin on osteoclasts and the proinflammatory cells involved at the bone metastatic site.
  • METHODS: The (64)Cu-RGD radiotracer was evaluated in the transgenic mouse expressing Tax (Tax(+)), which spontaneously develops osteolytic tumors throughout the vertebrae and hind limbs, using biodistribution studies and small-animal PET/CT.
  • Histologic analysis was also performed on Tax(+) mouse tails, using hematoxylin and eosin and tartrate-resistant acid phosphatase to confirm the presence of osteolytic bone lesions and the presence of osteoclasts, respectively.
  • Additionally, a proof-of-principle study was conducted with a small group of Tax(+) animals presenting with osteolytic lesions.
  • Additionally, Tax(+) mice between the ages of 6 and 12 mo had significantly more tracer activity associated with their tail vertebrae than did Tax(+) mice older than 12 mo (P = 0.003), suggesting that earlier bone metastases cause an increased recruitment of alpha(v)beta(3)-expressing cells.
  • Additionally, decreases in uptake were observed in the tails of Tax(+) mice after treatment with the osteoclast inhibitor zoledronic acid, and histologic analysis of Tax(+) mouse-tail vertebrae revealed the presence of Tax(+) tumor cells, osteoclasts, and proinflammatory cells within the bone microenvironment.
  • CONCLUSION: Together, these data suggest that (64)Cu-RGD has the potential to effectively image osteolytic bone metastases and monitor the physiologic changes in the bone metastatic microenvironment after osteoclast-inhibiting bisphosphonate therapy.

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  • (PMID = 19875645.001).
  • [ISSN] 1535-5667
  • [Journal-full-title] Journal of nuclear medicine : official publication, Society of Nuclear Medicine
  • [ISO-abbreviation] J. Nucl. Med.
  • [Language] ENG
  • [Grant] United States / NCI NIH HHS / CA / R21 CA098698; United States / NCI NIH HHS / CA / P30 CA91842; None / None / / P01 CA100730-01; United States / PHS HHS / / P01 100730; United States / NCI NIH HHS / CA / P30 CA091842; United States / NCI NIH HHS / CA / R24 CA086307; United States / NCI NIH HHS / CA / CA097250-06; United States / NCI NIH HHS / CA / F32 CA115148; United States / NCI NIH HHS / CA / P01 CA100730-01; United States / NCI NIH HHS / CA / R01 CA097250; United States / NCI NIH HHS / CA / R24 CA86307; United States / NCI NIH HHS / CA / R01 CA097250-06
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural; Research Support, U.S. Gov't, Non-P.H.S.
  • [Publication-country] United States
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Copper Radioisotopes; 0 / Diphosphonates; 0 / Gene Products, tax; 0 / Oligopeptides; 0 / Receptors, Vitronectin; 0 / integrin alphavbeta1; 99896-85-2 / arginyl-glycyl-aspartic acid
  • [Other-IDs] NLM/ NIHMS166780; NLM/ PMC2836828
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4. Niibe Y, Kuranami M, Matsunaga K, Takaya M, Kakita S, Hara T, Sekiguchi K, Watanabe M, Hayakawa K: Value of high-dose radiation therapy for isolated osseous metastasis in breast cancer in terms of oligo-recurrence. Anticancer Res; 2008 Nov-Dec;28(6B):3929-31
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  • [Title] Value of high-dose radiation therapy for isolated osseous metastasis in breast cancer in terms of oligo-recurrence.
  • BACKGROUND: For many years, patients with recurrent or distant metastatic cancer have been considered to be at the last stage of their lives because it was considered that the cancer had spread throughout the whole body.
  • However, the development of methods for the early detection of recurrence or distant metastases allows the detection of limited site recurrence or single organ metastases, called oligometastases or oligo-recurrence.
  • The purpose of the current study was to evaluate radiation therapy for solitary osseous metastasis of breast cancer in terms of oligometastasis and oligo-recurrence.
  • PATIENTS AND METHODS: One hundred and thirteen breast cancer patients were treated with radiation therapy for osseous metastases at Kitasato University Hospital, Japan between January 1998 and March 2003.
  • Out of them, seven patients had solitary osseous metastases with primary and other sites controlled.
  • These patients were registered in the current study, three had lumber spine metastases, three pelvic and one thoracic spine.
  • The median time between the initial treatment of the primary lesions and diagnosis of the osseous metastases was 44 months (range: 10-95 months).
  • Only one patient relapsed in terms of pain from the osseous metastasis.
  • CONCLUSION: Radiation therapy for solitary osseous metastasis might be efficacious and moreover, high dose could be useful for long-term pain relief of osseous metastasis.
  • [MeSH-major] Bone Neoplasms / radiotherapy. Bone Neoplasms / secondary. Breast Neoplasms / pathology. Breast Neoplasms / radiotherapy. Neoplasm Recurrence, Local / pathology. Neoplasm Recurrence, Local / radiotherapy

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  • (PMID = 19192651.001).
  • [ISSN] 0250-7005
  • [Journal-full-title] Anticancer research
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Anticancer Res.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
  • [Publication-country] Greece
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5. Hiraga T, Kizaka-Kondoh S, Hirota K, Hiraoka M, Yoneda T: Hypoxia and hypoxia-inducible factor-1 expression enhance osteolytic bone metastases of breast cancer. Cancer Res; 2007 May 1;67(9):4157-63
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  • [Title] Hypoxia and hypoxia-inducible factor-1 expression enhance osteolytic bone metastases of breast cancer.
  • Hypoxia is a common feature of solid tumors and is associated with their malignant phenotype.
  • The transcription factor hypoxia-inducible factor-1 (HIF-1) is a major regulator of adaptation to hypoxia and is implicated in the malignant progression of cancers.
  • Here, we studied whether hypoxia and HIF-1 expression contribute to the development of bone metastases using a well-characterized animal model of bone metastasis in MDA-MB-231 human breast cancer cells.
  • To study the role of hypoxia in bone metastases, we tested the effects of the fusion protein (TOP3), the oxygen-dependent degradation domain of HIF-1alpha fused with HIV-TAT, and procaspase-3.
  • TOP3 selectively induced apoptosis in hypoxic tumor cells in vitro and significantly reduced bone metastases in vivo.
  • We next examined the role of HIF-1 in bone metastases by establishing MDA-MB-231 cells overexpressing constitutively active or dominant-negative HIF-1alpha (MDA/CA-HIF or MDA/DN-HIF, respectively).
  • Bone metastases of MDA/CA-HIF were significantly increased with elevated number of CD31-positive blood vessels.
  • In contrast, bone metastases were significantly reduced in MDA/DN-HIF.
  • Because the progression of osteolytic bone metastases is due in part to the imbalance between bone formation and bone resorption, we examined the effects of hypoxia and HIF-1 on the differentiation of osteoblasts and osteoclasts.
  • In conclusion, these results suggest that tumor-associated hypoxia and HIF-1 expression promote the progression of bone metastases in breast cancer.
  • Our results also suggest that hypoxia and HIF-1 lead to the development of osteolytic bone metastases by suppressing osteoblast differentiation and promoting osteoclastogenesis.
  • [MeSH-major] Bone Neoplasms / metabolism. Bone Neoplasms / secondary. Breast Neoplasms / metabolism. Breast Neoplasms / pathology. Hypoxia-Inducible Factor 1, alpha Subunit / biosynthesis
  • [MeSH-minor] Animals. Caspase 3 / metabolism. Cell Hypoxia / physiology. Cell Line, Tumor. Female. Humans. Indazoles / pharmacology. Mice. Mice, Inbred C3H. Mice, Nude. Recombinant Fusion Proteins / metabolism. Recombinant Fusion Proteins / pharmacology. Transfection

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  • (PMID = 17483326.001).
  • [ISSN] 0008-5472
  • [Journal-full-title] Cancer research
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Cancer Res.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
  • [Publication-country] United States
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / HIF1A protein, human; 0 / Hypoxia-Inducible Factor 1, alpha Subunit; 0 / Indazoles; 0 / Recombinant Fusion Proteins; 0 / TOP3 fusion protein; 154453-18-6 / 3-(5'-hydroxymethyl-2'-furyl)-1-benzylindazole; EC 3.4.22.- / Caspase 3
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6. Veri' A, D'Andrea MR, Bonginelli P, Gasparini G: Clinical usefulness of bisphosphonates in oncology: treatment of bone metastases, antitumoral activity and effect on bone resorption markers. Int J Biol Markers; 2007 Jan-Mar;22(1):24-33
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  • [Title] Clinical usefulness of bisphosphonates in oncology: treatment of bone metastases, antitumoral activity and effect on bone resorption markers.
  • : The present article overviews the role of bisphosphonates for the treatment and prevention of bone metastases and their antiangiogenic effects and antitumoral activity.
  • The skeleton is a frequent and clinically relevant site of metastasis in cancer patients.
  • The major events related to bone metastases include bone pain, bone loss, hypercalcemia, spinal cord compression, and fractures.
  • On the basis of their radiographic features, bone metastases are classified as osteoblastic, osteoclastic, or mixed.
  • The primary goals of treatment of bone metastases are reduction of the risk of pathological fractures and other skeletal-related events, and pain control.
  • Further clinical studies are needed to determine the optimal treatment duration, timing and schedule of bisphosphonates, assess their role as adjuvant therapy for the prevention of bone metastases, and establish their antiangiogenic activity in association with standard cytotoxic and hormonal drugs for treatment of patients with advanced disease.

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  • (PMID = 28207153.001).
  • [ISSN] 1724-6008
  • [Journal-full-title] The International journal of biological markers
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Int. J. Biol. Markers
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] Italy
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7. Palma MA, Body JJ: Usefulness of bone formation markers in breast cancer. Int J Biol Markers; 2005 Jul - Sep;20(3):147-155
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  • [Title] Usefulness of bone formation markers in breast cancer.
  • : The skeleton is the main site affected by metastases and breast cancer is the most frequent tumor to invade bone.
  • The assessment of bone metastases is difficult and biochemical markers of bone formation (BFMs) could be a promising alternative.
  • Although the essential role of osteoblasts in the metastatic process of bone destruction is now well established, little attention has been paid to BFMs.
  • We conducted a Medline search for studies about BFMs in breast cancer.
  • Our review allows us to conclude that BFMs have high specificity but low sensitivity for the diagnosis of bone metastases.
  • The available biochemical markers cannot replace imaging techniques for the diagnosis of bone metastases.
  • Several studies indicate that BFM serum levels reflect total tumor burden in the skeleton.
  • Besides markers of bone resorption, biochemical markers of bone formation are a promising alternative for the assessment of metastatic bone disease, but large prospective studies are needed to address this important issue. (Int J Biol Markers 2005; 20: 146-55).

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  • (PMID = 28207125.001).
  • [ISSN] 1724-6008
  • [Journal-full-title] The International journal of biological markers
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Int. J. Biol. Markers
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] Italy
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8. Rosa MA, Maccauro G, Muratori F, Roda' MG: Endoprosthetic replacement for malignant bone tumours of the proximal femur. Hip Int; 2005 Oct - Dec;15(4):218-222
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  • [Title] Endoprosthetic replacement for malignant bone tumours of the proximal femur.
  • : Limb salvage procedures are considered the gold standard in the treatment of bone tumours.
  • The use of modular prostheses is one of the options for reconstruction after bone resection in primary tumours and in very restricted cases also in bone metastases.
  • The authors report the results of 27 consecutive cases of proximal femur bone resections and reconstructions with modular prostheses, using the Mutars system.
  • Functional results were related to the degree of bone resection and muscular sacrifice. (Hip International 2005; 15: 218-22).

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  • (PMID = 28224591.001).
  • [ISSN] 1724-6067
  • [Journal-full-title] Hip international : the journal of clinical and experimental research on hip pathology and therapy
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Hip Int
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] Italy
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9. Nishioka K, Kobayashi K, Aoki T, Hatano H, Komori T, Matsumoto T, Uemura Y: [Two patients of progressive gastric cancer accompanied by disseminated carcinomatosis of bone marrow due to bone metastasis with DIC successfully controlled by combination of S-1 and CDDP]. Gan To Kagaku Ryoho; 2007 Nov;34(12):2135-7
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  • [Title] [Two patients of progressive gastric cancer accompanied by disseminated carcinomatosis of bone marrow due to bone metastasis with DIC successfully controlled by combination of S-1 and CDDP].
  • We performed chemotherapy with combination of S-1 and CDDP for two patients with progressive gastric cancer accompanied by disseminated carcinomatosis of bone marrow due to bone metastasis with DIC, which was successfully controlled, and they had about one-year prognosis.
  • [MeSH-major] Bone Neoplasms / drug therapy. Bone Neoplasms / secondary. Cisplatin / therapeutic use. Oxonic Acid / therapeutic use. Stomach Neoplasms / drug therapy. Stomach Neoplasms / pathology. Tegafur / therapeutic use
  • [MeSH-minor] Antineoplastic Combined Chemotherapy Protocols / therapeutic use. Disease Progression. Drug Combinations. Female. Gastroscopy. Humans. Male. Middle Aged. Neoplasm Staging. Treatment Failure

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  • (PMID = 18219923.001).
  • [ISSN] 0385-0684
  • [Journal-full-title] Gan to kagaku ryoho. Cancer & chemotherapy
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Gan To Kagaku Ryoho
  • [Language] jpn
  • [Publication-type] Case Reports; English Abstract; Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] Japan
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Drug Combinations; 150863-82-4 / S 1 (combination); 1548R74NSZ / Tegafur; 5VT6420TIG / Oxonic Acid; Q20Q21Q62J / Cisplatin
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10. Tateishi U, Morita S, Taguri M, Shizukuishi K, Minamimoto R, Kawaguchi M, Murano T, Terauchi T, Inoue T, Kim EE: A meta-analysis of (18)F-Fluoride positron emission tomography for assessment of metastatic bone tumor. Ann Nucl Med; 2010 Aug;24(7):523-31
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  • [Title] A meta-analysis of (18)F-Fluoride positron emission tomography for assessment of metastatic bone tumor.
  • PURPOSE: The aim of this study was to assess the diagnostic performance of (18)F-Fluoride positron emission tomography (PET) or positron emission tomography/computed tomography (PET/CT) compared with bone scintigraphy (BS) planar or BS planar and single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) in evaluating patients with metastatic bone tumor.
  • MATERIALS AND METHODS: We performed a meta-analysis of all available studies addressing the diagnostic accuracy of (18)F-Fluoride PET, (18)F-Fluoride PET/CT, BS planar, and BS planar and SPECT for detecting the metastatic bone tumor.
  • CONCLUSION: (18)F-Fluoride PET or PET/CT has excellent diagnostic performance for the detection of metastatic bone tumor, but the estimated effective dose and average cost-effective ratio are at a disadvantage compared with BS planar or BS planar and SPECT.
  • [MeSH-major] Bone Neoplasms / radionuclide imaging. Bone Neoplasms / secondary. Fluorides. Fluorine Radioisotopes. Positron-Emission Tomography / methods

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  • (PMID = 20559896.001).
  • [ISSN] 1864-6433
  • [Journal-full-title] Annals of nuclear medicine
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Ann Nucl Med
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Meta-Analysis; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
  • [Publication-country] Japan
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Fluorine Radioisotopes; Q80VPU408O / Fluorides
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11. Satoh D, Ninomiya M, Umeoka T, Harano M, Sasaki H, Aoki H, Onoda T, Shiozaki Y, Ohno S, Higaki K, Takakura N: [A case of progressive gastric carcinoma accompanied by disseminated carcinomatosis of bone marrow due to bone metastasis with DIC recovery by joint administration of 5-FU and paclitaxel]. Gan To Kagaku Ryoho; 2006 Dec;33(13):2079-81
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  • [Title] [A case of progressive gastric carcinoma accompanied by disseminated carcinomatosis of bone marrow due to bone metastasis with DIC recovery by joint administration of 5-FU and paclitaxel].
  • Based on various tests, a diagnosis of scirrhous gastric carcinoma accompanied by bone metastasis and liver metastasis was made.
  • Although primary foci, bone metastasis, and liver metastasis were observed by image diagnostic procedures, recovery from DIC was achieved.
  • 5-FU+PTX therapy is considered to be effective for DIC due to bone metastasis of gastric carcinoma.
  • [MeSH-major] Adenocarcinoma, Scirrhous / drug therapy. Antineoplastic Combined Chemotherapy Protocols / therapeutic use. Bone Marrow Neoplasms / drug therapy. Bone Neoplasms / drug therapy. Disseminated Intravascular Coagulation / etiology. Liver Neoplasms / drug therapy. Stomach Neoplasms / drug therapy. Stomach Neoplasms / pathology

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  • (PMID = 17197758.001).
  • [ISSN] 0385-0684
  • [Journal-full-title] Gan to kagaku ryoho. Cancer & chemotherapy
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Gan To Kagaku Ryoho
  • [Language] jpn
  • [Publication-type] Case Reports; English Abstract; Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] Japan
  • [Chemical-registry-number] P88XT4IS4D / Paclitaxel; U3P01618RT / Fluorouracil
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12. Nakashima H, Katagiri H, Takahashi M, Sugiura H: Survival and ambulatory function after endoprosthetic replacement for metastatic bone tumor of the proximal femur. Nagoya J Med Sci; 2010 Feb;72(1-2):13-21
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  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] Survival and ambulatory function after endoprosthetic replacement for metastatic bone tumor of the proximal femur.
  • The purpose of this study was to clarify the ambulatory functional and oncological outcomes of tumor excision and endoprosthetic reconstruction for a metastatic lesion of the proximal femur.
  • Postoperative ambulatory function was inferior in patients with a short life expectancy; those with moderate or long life expectancy are good candidates for endoprosthetic replacement after tumor excision and can regain ambulant function for as long as nearly 80% of the survival period.
  • [MeSH-major] Arthroplasty, Replacement, Hip / methods. Femoral Neoplasms / secondary. Femoral Neoplasms / surgery

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  • (PMID = 20229699.001).
  • [ISSN] 0027-7622
  • [Journal-full-title] Nagoya journal of medical science
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Nagoya J Med Sci
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] Japan
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13. Yoshida K, Hiratsuka J: [Palliative radiotherapy for metastatic bone tumor]. Clin Calcium; 2006 Apr;16(4):641- 45
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  • [Title] [Palliative radiotherapy for metastatic bone tumor].
  • Bone metastases are one of the most common conditions requiring radiation therapy today.
  • Its main aim is relief of bone pain, prevention of pathological bone fractures as well as its healing, with anticipated effect upon improving mobility, function, and quality of life.
  • For localized bone pain, external beam radiation therapy (EBRT) will be successful in reducing pain in some 80% of patients.
  • According to the recent reports, carbon ion radiotherapy seems to be a safe and effective modality in the management of metastatic bone tumor not eligible for conventional EBRT.
  • For scattered painful metastases, the systemic administration of radioisotopes is thought to be effective.
  • [MeSH-major] Bone Neoplasms / radiotherapy. Bone Neoplasms / secondary. Pain / radiotherapy. Palliative Care / methods

  • MedlinePlus Health Information. consumer health - Bone Cancer.
  • MedlinePlus Health Information. consumer health - Pain.
  • MedlinePlus Health Information. consumer health - Palliative Care.
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  • (PMID = 16582516.001).
  • [ISSN] 0917-5857
  • [Journal-full-title] Clinical calcium
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Clin Calcium
  • [Language] jpn
  • [Publication-type] English Abstract; Journal Article; Review
  • [Publication-country] Japan
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Anti-Inflammatory Agents, Non-Steroidal; 0 / Carbon Radioisotopes; 0 / Iodine Radioisotopes; 0 / Strontium Radioisotopes
  • [Number-of-references] 8
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14. Toumpanakis C, Quigley A, Srirajaskanthan R, Marelli L, Singhrao T, Meyer T, Buscombe J, Caplin ME: 90-Yttrium-DOTA-octreotate for the treatment of advanced neuroendocrine tumors. J Clin Oncol; 2009 May 20;27(15_suppl):4594
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  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] 90-Yttrium-DOTA-octreotate for the treatment of advanced neuroendocrine tumors.
  • : 4594 Background: The expression of somatostatin receptors (SSTR) on Neuroendocrine Tumors (NETs) has led not only to tumour visualization utilizing SSTR scintigraphy, but also to the development of receptor-targeted radionuclide therapy.
  • Isotopes such as 111-Indium, 90-Yttrium and 177-Lutetium are linked to somatostatin analogues and then internalized by tumour cells.
  • AIM: to estimate efficacy and tolerability of 90-Yttrium-tyr3-DOTA-octreotate in patients with metastatic progressive NETs.
  • METHODS: 89 patients (median age: 51.5 years) with metastatic NETs were studied.
  • In all patients, the tumours had shown good uptake either in the OctreoScan or in the Ga-68 octreotate PET scan.
  • RESULTS: In all patients the post treatment scintigraphy demonstrated good uptake and localization by the tumors.
  • 31/89 (35%) had continued tumor progression.
  • Bone marrow toxicity (WHO grade II) was noted in 15/89 (16.8%), persistent in 4 patients with significant bone metastases.
  • CONCLUSIONS: 90Y-DOTA-octreotate is a well-tolerated and safe treatment for patients with progressive neuroendocrine tumors.

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  • (PMID = 27963114.001).
  • [ISSN] 1527-7755
  • [Journal-full-title] Journal of clinical oncology : official journal of the American Society of Clinical Oncology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] J. Clin. Oncol.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] United States
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15. Zhao Y, Liao H, Hou X, Sun J, Guo Y, Li S, Zhang L: A prospective, open-label, randomized phase II trial to evaluate the changes of bone resorption marker after administration of zoledronic acid (ZOL) in nasopharyngeal cancer (NPC) patients with bone metastases (BM). J Clin Oncol; 2009 May 20;27(15_suppl):6063
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  • [Title] A prospective, open-label, randomized phase II trial to evaluate the changes of bone resorption marker after administration of zoledronic acid (ZOL) in nasopharyngeal cancer (NPC) patients with bone metastases (BM).
  • : 6063 Background: ZOL is the only bisphosphonate that has demonstrated efficacy for the prevention of skeletal-related events (SREs) in patients with BM in a wide range of tumor types.
  • Recent retrospective analyses also showed that normalization of N-telopeptide of type I collagen (NTX) over 3 months by the treatment of ZOL provided a continuum of SRE risk reduction and survival benefit in patients with BM (Lipton et al.
  • Urinary NTX was measured by ELISA method (Coleman et al.

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  • (PMID = 27961929.001).
  • [ISSN] 1527-7755
  • [Journal-full-title] Journal of clinical oncology : official journal of the American Society of Clinical Oncology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] J. Clin. Oncol.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] United States
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16. Medioni J, Deplanque G, Maurina T, Ferrero JM, Rodier JM, Raymond E, Allyon J, Kalla S, Dufour-Lamartinie JF, Oudard S: Dose finding and safety analysis of inecalcitol in combination with a docetaxel-prednisone regimen in hormone-refractory prostate cancer (HRPC) patients. J Clin Oncol; 2009 May 20;27(15_suppl):5151
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  • [Title] Dose finding and safety analysis of inecalcitol in combination with a docetaxel-prednisone regimen in hormone-refractory prostate cancer (HRPC) patients.
  • : 5151 Background: Inecalcitol is a novel synthetic vitamin D3 analogue with potent antiproliferative effects in human cancer cell lines and a 100-fold lower hypercalcemic activity than calcitriol in animal models.
  • RESULTS: Five dose levels: 40, 80, 160, 300, 600 μg have been evaluated in 34 pts; 9 pts are still being treated at 600 μg; 25 pts have completed 6 cycles (13 bone metastases; 3 extrasqueletic metastasis, 8 bone and extrasqueletic metastases; 1 PSA-only disease).

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  • (PMID = 27964450.001).
  • [ISSN] 1527-7755
  • [Journal-full-title] Journal of clinical oncology : official journal of the American Society of Clinical Oncology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] J. Clin. Oncol.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] United States
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17. Tomasevic Z, Radosevic-Jelic L, Tomasevic ZM, Jelic S, Milovanovic Z: Late relapse in triple negative breast cancer. J Clin Oncol; 2009 May 20;27(15_suppl):e12022
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  • [Title] Late relapse in triple negative breast cancer.
  • : e12022 Background: Approximately 10%-15 % breast cancer (BC) are classified as triple negative.
  • Although triple negative status carries grave prognosis, recent data suggests that it is mostly due to high relapse rate in first 2-3 years following initial diagnosis.
  • Late relapse is determined as contra-lateral BC, loco-regional relapse, or any distant metastases at least 5 years after initial diagnosis of BC.
  • HER-2 3 + is recorded in 17 specimen (8.9%); HER-2 2+/1+ in 86 (45.5%); and HER-2 0+ in 86 (45.5%) Among patients with HER-2 0+ only 10 also had ER score 0 and PGR score 0 (5.3%).
  • Three pts had bone metastases (3/10) and only 1 pt had pleural relapse (1/10).
  • None of these pts had liver, lung, or brain metastases.

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  • (PMID = 27964302.001).
  • [ISSN] 1527-7755
  • [Journal-full-title] Journal of clinical oncology : official journal of the American Society of Clinical Oncology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] J. Clin. Oncol.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] United States
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18. Maroto-Rey P, Sala N, Mora J, Villavicencio H, Esquena S, Robert L, Perez J, Mazarico J, Barnadas A: Circulating chromogranin A as a marker for poor-prognosis hormone refractory prostate cancer without neuroendocrine features: Prospective analyses of a cohort of patients. J Clin Oncol; 2009 May 20;27(15_suppl):e16130
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  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] Circulating chromogranin A as a marker for poor-prognosis hormone refractory prostate cancer without neuroendocrine features: Prospective analyses of a cohort of patients.
  • : e16130 Background: Some patients may develop hormone refractory prostate (HRPC) cancer with neuroendocrine features, although they were not recognizable in the initial biopsy.
  • Serum chromogranin is a marker for tumors with neuroendrocrine differentiation.
  • We analyzed the time to hormone-refractory disease since diagnosis, and overall survival, as well as pattern of relapse (visceral vs. nonvisceral disease).
  • Patients with positive (>100 ug/L) had stadistically significant lower levels of hemoglobine (13.8 vs 12.3), and a trend to have more visceral disease vs locoregional diasease or bone metastases, a lower albumine level (39.85 vs 45.05), higher alkaline phosphatase (221 vs 111), and LDH (1,914.5 vs 415).
  • CONCLUSIONS: The analysis of this cohort of patients suggests that serum chromogranine A correlates with other known adverse prognosis factors of survival in prostate cancer patients.

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  • (PMID = 27963370.001).
  • [ISSN] 1527-7755
  • [Journal-full-title] Journal of clinical oncology : official journal of the American Society of Clinical Oncology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] J. Clin. Oncol.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] United States
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19. Gravis G, Walz J, Bagattini S, Esterni B, Mimoun C, Salem N, Marcy M, Brunelle S, Viens P, Bladou F: External validation of a nomogram predicting survival in men with metastatic hormone-refractory prostate cancer. J Clin Oncol; 2009 May 20;27(15_suppl):e16066
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  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] External validation of a nomogram predicting survival in men with metastatic hormone-refractory prostate cancer.
  • : e16066 Background: Armstrong et al. (Clin Cancer Res.
  • 2007;13:6396-403) recently published a nomogram predicting the probability of survival in patients with hormone-refractory prostate cancer.
  • We validated this nomogram in a cohort of patients with hormone-refractory prostate cancer participating in five phase II trials.
  • METHODS: In our institution, 84 patients received chemotherapy for metastatic symptomatic hormone-refractory prostate cancer from September 1999 to November 2006.
  • At the time of inclusion, median age was 69.0 years, median PSA was 40ng/ml, 93% had known bone metastases and 19% had visceral metastases.
  • CONCLUSIONS: The Armstrong et al<sup>1</sup> nomogram provides accurate survival predictions in patients with hormone-refractory prostate cancer.

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  • (PMID = 27963062.001).
  • [ISSN] 1527-7755
  • [Journal-full-title] Journal of clinical oncology : official journal of the American Society of Clinical Oncology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] J. Clin. Oncol.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] United States
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20. Patil S, Figlin RA, Hutson TE, Michaelson MD, Négrier S, Kim ST, Huang X, Motzer RJ: Prognostic factors for overall survival with sunitinib as first-line therapy in patients with metastatic renal cell carcinoma (mRCC). J Clin Oncol; 2009 May 20;27(15_suppl):5042
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  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] Prognostic factors for overall survival with sunitinib as first-line therapy in patients with metastatic renal cell carcinoma (mRCC).
  • RESULTS: In multivariate analysis of sunitinib patients, factors associated with longer OS include: interval from diagnosis to treatment ≥1 yr, ECOG PS of 0, lower corrected calcium, absence of bone metastases, lower lactic dehydrogenase (LDH), and higher hemoglobin (Hgb) ( table ).
  • For the IFN-α treatment arm, male gender, absence of bone or lymph node metastases, lower LDH, higher Hgb, lower corrected calcium, higher neutrophil count, and interval from diagnosis to treatment ≥1 yr were associated with longer OS.
  • Further studies are warranted to independently validate these findings as well as to identify tumor-specific prognostic factors.

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  • (PMID = 27962940.001).
  • [ISSN] 1527-7755
  • [Journal-full-title] Journal of clinical oncology : official journal of the American Society of Clinical Oncology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] J. Clin. Oncol.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] United States
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21. Pineda C, Cadogan KV, Cadogan MA: Distribution of metastases in NSCLC: Economic impact of imaging. J Clin Oncol; 2009 May 20;27(15_suppl):e19036
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  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] Distribution of metastases in NSCLC: Economic impact of imaging.
  • Given that many patients have metastases to several organs, one important question is - "what is the frequency of metastases in the chest, the abdomen, the pelvis, elsewhere?
  • RESULTS: We found that there were 690 metastases to the chest, 205 to the abdomen, 80 to the bones, 18 to the pelvis, 13 to the brain and 23 others, not specified.
  • If we consider the actual incidence of metastases, we find the following absolute statistics: 16 patients had pelvic involvement.
  • This compares with 42 patients with adrenal metastases, 81 with liver metastases, 80 with bone metastases, 112 with hilar adenopathy, and 159 with mediastinal adenopathy. (See Table ) Conclusions: The cost of a CT of the pelvis varies, but is estimated at approximately $2000[Fred, Herbert L., MD, MACP.
  • The incidence of NSCLC is approximately 172,000 in 2008[Ries, LAG, et al (eds).
  • SEER Cancer Statistics Review, 1975-2005.
  • National Cancer Institute. 03JAN2009. http://seer.cancer.gov/csr/1975_2005/ .].
  • These costs can be justified in a Research setting, but it is more difficult to do so in the clinical arena.

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  • (PMID = 27962121.001).
  • [ISSN] 1527-7755
  • [Journal-full-title] Journal of clinical oncology : official journal of the American Society of Clinical Oncology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] J. Clin. Oncol.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] United States
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22. Ghimire BR: Effects of zoledronic acid (ZOL) on proliferation of nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC) cell lines and synergistic effects of ZOL and cisplatin on NPC cell lines. J Clin Oncol; 2009 May 20;27(15_suppl):e13536
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  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • : e13536 Background: Recent evidence suggests that zoledronic acid (ZOL) inhibits cancer cell proliferation and exerts synergistic antitumor activity at clinically achievable concentrations and have shown the potential to become attractive agents for cancer therapy.
  • NPC cell lines were seeded in a flat-bottomed 96well plate at 10<sup>+4</sup> in 200μl of medium per well and incubated with various concentrations of ZOL for 72 hours.
  • The entire specimen was incubated for a total of 72 hours and the absorbance was measured at a wavelength of 540nm in a multiwell spectrophotometer.
  • Thus, ZOL in combination with other cytotoxic agents may be promising therapeutic strategies for NPC with bone metastasis.

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  • (PMID = 27961335.001).
  • [ISSN] 1527-7755
  • [Journal-full-title] Journal of clinical oncology : official journal of the American Society of Clinical Oncology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] J. Clin. Oncol.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] United States
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23. Vigo SA, Sansano M, Marmissolle F, Mainella A, Lujan L, Price P, Antonelli M, Mohamed F, Giacomi N: Characteristics and behavior of HER-2/neu positive tumors in patients under 35 years of age with breast cancer. J Clin Oncol; 2009 May 20;27(15_suppl):e11634
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  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] Characteristics and behavior of HER-2/neu positive tumors in patients under 35 years of age with breast cancer.
  • : e11634 Background: Breast cancer (BC) rarely occurs in young women.
  • It is believed that tumor is more aggressive in biologic nature in this group of pts.
  • OBJECTIVE: to describe Her2/neu status, tumor behavior and prognosis in women aged 35 and under with BC.
  • METHODS: We reviewed the records of 45 women aged 35 years or less, with diagnosis of BC between 1999 and 2007.
  • RESULTS: Her2/neu overexpression showed up in 8 tumors (17.7%) and all of them were confirmed by FISH.
  • Stage at diagnosis was I 2 pts and II 6 pts.
  • 5 out of the 8 pts with Her2/neu tumors had axillary node involvement (11.1% out of the total of population), and tumor size was more than 2cm at diagnosis.
  • Postoperative radiotherapy was given to 6pts while all pts with Her2/neu positive tumors received chemotherapy with anthracyclines, taxanes and trastuzumab.
  • Disease free survival of 24 month was achieved in 5pts, 1pt died with bone, lung and liver metastases.
  • 2pts had progressive disease (bone and lung metastases one of them, and local recurrence the other one).
  • In this small group of pts lymph node involvement was frequent and tumor size was more than 2cm.
  • Progressive disease with distant metastases in bone, lung and liver was observed.

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  • (PMID = 27961197.001).
  • [ISSN] 1527-7755
  • [Journal-full-title] Journal of clinical oncology : official journal of the American Society of Clinical Oncology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] J. Clin. Oncol.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] United States
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24. Handkiewicz-Junak D, Roskosz J, Kropinska A, Kozielski J, Krzywiecki A, Krajewska J, Krajewska J, Puch Z, Olczyk T, Jarzab B: Efficacy and safety of radioiodine in the treatment of disseminated differentiated thyroid cancer (DTC) in children. J Clin Oncol; 2009 May 20;27(15_suppl):10065
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  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] Efficacy and safety of radioiodine in the treatment of disseminated differentiated thyroid cancer (DTC) in children.
  • : 10065 Background: Distant metastases, mainly to lung are diagnosed in about 20% of children with DTC.
  • METHODS: From 235 children (median age 13.9) diagnosed either with papillary (82%) or follicular cancer (18%), 42 (17.9%) had lung, and 2 (9%) bone metastases (median time of observation 105 months).
  • 28 (67%) of the children were lately re-evaluated with high resolution CT, ultrasound, biochemistry, and spirometry.
  • RESULTS: In most children, 29/44 (66%), distant metastases were diagnosed in radioiodine scan while radiological examinations were normal.
  • In 5/28 (18%) of the children with lung metastases some small foci of focal lung fibrosis were diagnosed with CT.
  • However, comparable percentage of focal fibrosis was observed in DTC children without lung metastases.
  • CONCLUSIONS: Complete remission of distant metastases can be achieved in about 85% of children with DTC treated with radioiodine.

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  • (PMID = 27962500.001).
  • [ISSN] 1527-7755
  • [Journal-full-title] Journal of clinical oncology : official journal of the American Society of Clinical Oncology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] J. Clin. Oncol.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] United States
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25. Quinten C, Martinelli F, Coens C, Cleeland CS, Flechtner H, Gotay C, Greimel E, Taphoorn MJ, Weis J, Bottomley A: The predictive accuracy of survival between patient-reported versus clinician-reported pain in a cohort of 1,214 patients with metastatic cancer. J Clin Oncol; 2009 May 20;27(15_suppl):9607
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  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] The predictive accuracy of survival between patient-reported versus clinician-reported pain in a cohort of 1,214 patients with metastatic cancer.
  • However, in patients with metastatic disease agreement between clinician and patient ratings is known to be poor.
  • The objectives of this meta-analysis are to investigate the degree of agreement between clinician- versus patient- reported cancer pain at entry in a cohort of patients with metastatic cancer and whether their ratings were associated with a difference in survival.
  • METHODS: Eight European Organisation for Research and Treatment of Cancer (EORTC) Randomized Controlled Trials (RCT), across different cancer sites, were eligible for this study.
  • The Wilcoxon rank sign test was applied to investigate scoring differences between patient- versus clinician- reported pain and logistic regression to model whether clinical parameters, i.e., performance status, gender, age or cancer site, affected scoring differences.
  • Cancer pain was specified as bone metastasis by 643 (53%) patients and not specified otherwise.
  • Scoring differences were found to be statistically significant for colorectal (p<.01), lung (p<.01), prostate (p<.01), and breast (p=0.03, but not for pancreatic cancer (p=0.49).
  • Such results provide a rationale to include patient self reported pain assessment in future cancer RCTs to better assess disease status and survival prognosis.

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  • (PMID = 27963844.001).
  • [ISSN] 1527-7755
  • [Journal-full-title] Journal of clinical oncology : official journal of the American Society of Clinical Oncology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] J. Clin. Oncol.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] United States
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26. Ordentlich P, Tee L, Huynh Y, Mee S, Mamuszka H, Lee G: Ex-vivo analysis of the isoform selective histone deacetylase inhibitor entinostat in triple-negative breast cancer tumors. J Clin Oncol; 2009 May 20;27(15_suppl):e14597
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  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] Ex-vivo analysis of the isoform selective histone deacetylase inhibitor entinostat in triple-negative breast cancer tumors.
  • : e14597 Background: Triple-negative (ER, PR, HER2 negative) breast cancer represents an unmet need for which novel agents and approaches are essential.
  • Entinostat is an orally available, class 1 isoform selective histone deacetylase inhibitor currently in multiple phase 2 clinical studies including advanced NSCLC and breast cancer.
  • Studies in vitro and in vivo in the triple negative cell line model MDA-MB-231 have established single agent activity of entinostat in inhibiting tumor growth as well preventing bone metastases.
  • In addition, entinostat induces expression of ERα in MDA-MB-231 in vivo and is synergistic with endocrine therapy agents to inhibit tumor growth of ER negative cancer cells.
  • The aim of these studies was to confirm the activity of entinostat in triple negative breast cancers using human breast tumor explants.
  • METHODS: Cytotoxicity of entinostat was determined by the Oncotech Extreme Drug Resistance (EDR) proliferation assay using ten cryopreserved breast tumor explants known to lack estrogen receptor, progesterone receptor and HER2/neu expression (i.e.
  • RESULTS: Dose response curves of entinostat were analyzed and compared to paclitaxel at 2.45 μM in ten triple negative breast tumor explants in the EDR assay.
  • Entinostat was broadly effective in all of the tumors tested, with most samples showing dose-dependent response for the range of concentrations analyzed (0.003 - 10 μM).
  • Two of the breast tumors that were most sensitive to entinostat (IC<sub>50</sub> 30- 100nM) were also sensitive to paclitaxel.
  • In contrast, entinostat effectively inhibited (IC<sub>50</sub> 10-270nM) the growth of eight of the tumors that were resistant to paclitaxel (i.e.
  • Overall, all breast tumors tested were sensitive to entinostat at clinically achievable concentrations regardless of paclitaxel resistance indicating entinostat may improve the treatment outcome of triple negative breast cancer patients.
  • CONCLUSIONS: Entinostat is an effective agent at inhibiting the growth of triple negative breast tumors with clinically relevant IC<sub>50</sub>'s ranging from 10nM to 270nM.
  • A pre-surgical clinical study to assess the activity of entinostat in triple negative breast cancer patients is planned.

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  • (PMID = 27963724.001).
  • [ISSN] 1527-7755
  • [Journal-full-title] Journal of clinical oncology : official journal of the American Society of Clinical Oncology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] J. Clin. Oncol.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] United States
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27. Langeberg WJ, O'Malley CD, Critchlow CW, Fryzek JP: Risk of acute renal failure among breast cancer patients and chemotherapy treatment of breast cancer patients with a history of renal insufficiency in a commercially-insured population in the United States. J Clin Oncol; 2009 May 20;27(15_suppl):e22104
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  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] Risk of acute renal failure among breast cancer patients and chemotherapy treatment of breast cancer patients with a history of renal insufficiency in a commercially-insured population in the United States.
  • : e22104 Background: Risk of acute renal failure (ARF) among breast cancer (BC) patients may increase with nephrotoxic chemotherapy and other exposures, but this risk is not well characterized.
  • Furthermore, among patients who present with renal insufficiencies (RI) at cancer diagnosis, subsequent treatment patterns are not well described.
  • The cohort included all women diagnosed with BC from 2000 to 2007 who were 18-64 years at diagnosis with no history of cancer (n=13,296).
  • We defined a diagnosis of BC as at least one inpatient or two outpatient claims more than 30 days apart with an ICD-9 code of 174.
  • Among patients with no history of RI (n=13,150), we calculated the cumulative incidence (CI) of ARF_the proportion with at least one inpatient or two outpatient claims with an ICD-9 code of 584 or 586 in the first year following cancer diagnosis.
  • RESULTS: Among BC patients with no history of RI, 0.3% were diagnosed with ARF within a year after cancer diagnosis.
  • The CI of ARF was higher in patients with metastases: 0.7% for any metastasis, 2.3% for bone metastasis, and 0.1% for no metastasis.
  • The CI of ARF was higher in patients with congestive heart failure (1.4%), diabetes (0.9%), and/or hypertension (0.8%) at cancer diagnosis compared to patients without these comorbidities (0.2%).
  • CONCLUSIONS: Breast cancer patients who present with comorbidities, develop metastases, or are given nephrotoxic chemotherapy or IV bisphosphonates are at higher risk of acute renal failure in the first year after breast cancer diagnosis.
  • More research is warranted on the treatment of breast cancer patients with a history of renal insufficiency.

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  • (PMID = 27963501.001).
  • [ISSN] 1527-7755
  • [Journal-full-title] Journal of clinical oncology : official journal of the American Society of Clinical Oncology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] J. Clin. Oncol.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] United States
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28. Berkowitz JL, Fernandez A, Dichmann RA, Kennedy KA, DiCarlo B: Clinical trials networks and enrollment of historically underrepresented populations in medical oncology trials. J Clin Oncol; 2009 May 20;27(15_suppl):e20598
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  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • METHODS: In this study, we attempted to determine the effect that clinical trials networks can have on the accrual of cancer patients into clinical investigations.
  • We retrospectively analyzed the records from 2002-2008 of a private practice located over 150 miles from an academic center for accrual into trials.
  • This practice is a member of a clinical trials network affiliated with a major academic cancer center.
  • Accrued patients were divided into subgroups based upon type of malignancy, ethnicity and whether or not they were elderly.
  • By malignancy, they were as follows: breast 36%, colorectal 22%, lung 13%, prostate 8.4%, gastric and lymphoma each 3.0%, pancreatic 1.8%, melanoma 1.2% and ovarian 0.6%.
  • The other 18 patients were in trials for either chemotherapy related anemia 7.8% or bony metastases 3.0%.
  • For lung, colorectal, and breast cancer, the number of patients on trial as a percentage of all treated onsite were also higher than the national averages.

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  • (PMID = 27961158.001).
  • [ISSN] 1527-7755
  • [Journal-full-title] Journal of clinical oncology : official journal of the American Society of Clinical Oncology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] J. Clin. Oncol.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] United States
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29. Mayordomo JI, Baena JM, Cirera L, Sanchez-Rovira P, Godes MJ, Galan A, Jimenez-Orozco E, Muñoz M, Tusquets I, Sanchez MJ: Final results of a randomized trial on the role of maintenance chemotherapy with weekly paclitaxel for patients with metastatic breast cancer. J Clin Oncol; 2009 May 20;27(15_suppl):1001
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  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] Final results of a randomized trial on the role of maintenance chemotherapy with weekly paclitaxel for patients with metastatic breast cancer.
  • : 1001 Background: Chemotherapy for patients with metastatic breast cancer is not curative.
  • Optimal duration of chemotherapy in women with metastatic breast cancer is an open issue.
  • The primary objective was to determine if addition of maintenance weekly paclitaxel prolongs progression-free survival in women with metastatic breast cancer on first-line chemotherapy.
  • Secondary objectives included overall survival and toxicity.
  • METHODS: Following Ethical Committee approval and informed consent, from 2002 to 2006 180 women with metastatic breast cancer and no prior chemotherapy for metastatic disease were randomized 1:1 in the TASMAN phase III trial to: 3 courses of epirubicin 100 mg/m2 day 1 q 21 days, followed by 3 courses of paclitaxel 225 mg/m2 day 1 q 21 days, without further chemotherapy or hormonal therapy until progression (arm A), or 3 courses of epirubicin followed by 3 courses of paclitaxel and then maintenance with paclitaxel 60 mg/m2 day 1 q 7 days until progression or unacceptable toxicity (arm B).
  • Sites of metastases: bone (36%), liver (20%), pleura and/or lung (19%), skin and/or lymph nodes (18%).

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  • (PMID = 27960721.001).
  • [ISSN] 1527-7755
  • [Journal-full-title] Journal of clinical oncology : official journal of the American Society of Clinical Oncology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] J. Clin. Oncol.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] United States
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30. Gross ME, Soscia J, Sakowsky S, Castellanos O, Agus DB: Phase I trial of RAD001 (R), bevacizumab (B), and docetaxel (D) for castration-resistant prostate cancer (CRPC). J Clin Oncol; 2009 May 20;27(15_suppl):5154
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  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] Phase I trial of RAD001 (R), bevacizumab (B), and docetaxel (D) for castration-resistant prostate cancer (CRPC).
  • METHODS: Eligible patients (pts) had progressive, metastatic, chemo-naive CRPC.
  • If no DLT occurred after all pts completed 2 cycles in a cohort, pts were enrolled at the next dose level.
  • Efficacy is explored as: maximal confirmed PSA decline; partial or complete response (PR+CR) by RECIST criteria; and/or changes in bone scintigraphy.
  • All pts had PSA elevations, 5 pts had metastasis to lung and/or lymph nodes.
  • 9 pts had bone metastases.
  • CONCLUSIONS: We conclude that the cohort 1 dose level of D 75 mg/m2, R 2.5 mg, B 15 mg/kg is safe and demonstrates anti-cancer efficacy.

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  • (PMID = 27964476.001).
  • [ISSN] 1527-7755
  • [Journal-full-title] Journal of clinical oncology : official journal of the American Society of Clinical Oncology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] J. Clin. Oncol.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] United States
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31. Galy G, Labidi S, Perol D, Carol C, Guastalla J, Favier B: Metastatic breast cancer treated by chemotherapy: Trends in survival and costs in two patient cohorts treated in 1994-1998 and 2003-2006. J Clin Oncol; 2009 May 20;27(15_suppl):6552
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  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] Metastatic breast cancer treated by chemotherapy: Trends in survival and costs in two patient cohorts treated in 1994-1998 and 2003-2006.
  • : 6552 Background: Although new chemotherapy agents have been approved during the past decade for the treatment of metastatic breast cancer (MBC), it is unclear whether their use has changed the outcome of patients.
  • Tumor and treatment characteristics, costs of chemotherapy, and patient outcome were compared using the X<sup>2</sup> test, the log rank test, and Cox regression analysis.
  • Overall survival was calculated from the date of MBC diagnosis to the date of death or last follow-up.
  • Chemotherapy-related costs were calculated according to the 2008 pricelist of French cancer centers.
  • In multivariate analysis, prognostic factors for overall survival were the number of metastatic sites (HR 2.06; p < 0.0001), bone metastases (HR 0.67; p = 0.007), and hormone receptors (HR 0.56; p = 0.002).
  • CONCLUSIONS: Despite the implementation of numerous novel chemotherapeutic agents, the overall survival of patients with metastatic breast cancer has not improved over the last decade on the scale of our institution, whereas the costs of chemotherapy have significantly increased.

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  • (PMID = 27963767.001).
  • [ISSN] 1527-7755
  • [Journal-full-title] Journal of clinical oncology : official journal of the American Society of Clinical Oncology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] J. Clin. Oncol.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] United States
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32. Hatoum HT, Lin S, Smith MR, Lipton A: Effect of adherence to monthly zoledronic acid treatment on risk and frequency of skeletal complications and follow-up duration in breast cancer patients. J Clin Oncol; 2009 May 20;27(15_suppl):9593
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  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] Effect of adherence to monthly zoledronic acid treatment on risk and frequency of skeletal complications and follow-up duration in breast cancer patients.
  • : 9593 Background: Bone is the most common site of metastasis in breast cancer patients (pts).
  • METHODS: Female breast cancer pts with first bone metastasis (BM) diagnosed between Jan 03 to Oct 06 were identified from PharMetrics database.
  • TX selection bias was handled by calculating propensity scores using year of first BM diagnosis, having other metastases or >1 BM claim, use of opioids and oral bisphoshonate before BM.
  • CONCLUSIONS: TX with zoledronic acid in breast cancer pts with BM positively impacts the risk, frequency of SC and follow-up duration.

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  • (PMID = 27963730.001).
  • [ISSN] 1527-7755
  • [Journal-full-title] Journal of clinical oncology : official journal of the American Society of Clinical Oncology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] J. Clin. Oncol.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] United States
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33. Kaiser T, Klein G, Solomayer E, Wallwiener D, Fehm T: Interactions of breast cancer cells with the microenvironment of the human bone marrow. J Clin Oncol; 2009 May 20;27(15_suppl):e22097
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  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] Interactions of breast cancer cells with the microenvironment of the human bone marrow.
  • : e22097 Background: Bone is one of the most favored sites for metastasis of breast cancer cells (BrCa) resulting in the formation of osteolytic and/or osteoblastic lesions.
  • There is increasing evidence that the bone marrow (BM) microenvironment plays a pivotal role in modulating tumor cell homing to the bone, metastasis and progression.
  • However, the molecular crosstalk between BrCa cells and the cellular and extracellular components of the bone marrow leading to osteotropism still remains a poorly characterized step in the metastatic process.
  • METHODS: Cell adhesion and migration assays using the invasive MDA-MB-231 and the noninvasive MCF7 BrCa cell lines were performed to investigate the impact of BM components on cellular functions of tumor cells.
  • RESULTS: Cell-matrix adhesion assays showed a strong and concentration-dependent attachment of BrCa cells to several extracellular matrix components present in the human bone marrow such as fibronectin, different laminin isoforms, collagens type I and IV or tenascin-C.
  • Notably, cell-cell adhesion experiments with primary osteoclasts revealed an anti-adhesive effect on tumor cell binding leading to no attachment activity of BrCa cells with the cell surface of primary osteoclasts.
  • The influence of cellular components of the BM on tumor cell migration was analyzed by cell migration assays using conditioned media of osteoblasts, osteoclasts and stromal cells or a modified Transwell chamber technique.
  • The migration assays with invasive MDA-MB-231 cells clearly showed that osteoblasts, but not osteoclasts or stromal cells released factors which led to a faster wound closure, suggesting an enhanced migratory ability of the metastatic tumor cells, whereas the migration of nonmetastatic MCF7 cells was unaffected.
  • CONCLUSIONS: These data indicate that the crosstalk with osteoblasts affects both the adhesive and the migratory ability of BrCa cells favoring the bone colonization process.
  • Furthermore, the presented experimental conditions may provide useful tools to study effects of antiresorptive drugs like bisphosphonates to improve therapeutic strategies for treatment metastatic bone disease.

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  • (PMID = 27963283.001).
  • [ISSN] 1527-7755
  • [Journal-full-title] Journal of clinical oncology : official journal of the American Society of Clinical Oncology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] J. Clin. Oncol.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] United States
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34. Flechon A, Pouessel D, Ferlay C, Perol D, Beuzeboc P, Gravis G, Joly F, Oudard S, Deplanque G, Droz J, Culine S: Results of a phase II study of carboplatin and etoposide in patients with progressive metastatic castration refractory prostate cancer (mCRPC) and neuro-endocrine differentiation. J Clin Oncol; 2009 May 20;27(15_suppl):e16073
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  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] Results of a phase II study of carboplatin and etoposide in patients with progressive metastatic castration refractory prostate cancer (mCRPC) and neuro-endocrine differentiation.
  • We assessed the efficacy and toxicity of a platin-based chemotherapy regimen in patients with mCPRC and neuro-endocrine differentiation defined by: either increased circulating neuro-endocrine markers (chromogranin A: CgA, Neuron Specific Enolase: NSE) more than 1.5 X normal serum values and/or visceral metastases confirmed with immunihistochemical proof of neuro-endocrine differentiation on pathological sample.
  • Patients had bone metastases (78%), lymph nodes involvement (49%), lung metastases (35%), hepatic involvement (33%) and other localizations (17%).

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  • (PMID = 27963045.001).
  • [ISSN] 1527-7755
  • [Journal-full-title] Journal of clinical oncology : official journal of the American Society of Clinical Oncology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] J. Clin. Oncol.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] United States
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35. Kosmas C, Mylonakis N, Tsakonas G, Vorgias G, Pantelis N, Politis P, Kalinoglou N, Tsavaris N, Akrivos T, Karabelis A: Paclitaxel (T), ifosfamide (I), and carboplatin (Cb) (TICb) combination chemotherapy in advanced uterine and adnexal malignant mixed mullerian tumors (MMMTs). J Clin Oncol; 2009 May 20;27(15_suppl):5517
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  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] Paclitaxel (T), ifosfamide (I), and carboplatin (Cb) (TICb) combination chemotherapy in advanced uterine and adnexal malignant mixed mullerian tumors (MMMTs).
  • : 5517 Background: Malignant mixed mullerian tumors (MMMTs) of the uterus and adnexa represent aggressive gynecologic malignancies with a high rate of locoregional and distant failure.
  • Disease sites at diagnosis included: pelvic disease 12; pelvic/paraortic lymph nodes 14; peritoneal implants 16; liver 4; lung nodules 9; bone metastases 1; malignant pleural effusion 4.

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  • (PMID = 27962459.001).
  • [ISSN] 1527-7755
  • [Journal-full-title] Journal of clinical oncology : official journal of the American Society of Clinical Oncology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] J. Clin. Oncol.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] United States
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36. Nakayama T, Inaji H, Iwata H, Yamamoto N, Sato Y, Tokuda Y, Aogi K, Saji S, Ikeda T, Noguchi S: Assessment of uterus, bone, serum lipids, and hormones in postmenopausal breast cancer patients treated with TAS-108, a novel steroidal antiestrogen: Results of a randomized phase II study. J Clin Oncol; 2009 May 20;27(15_suppl):1120
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  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] Assessment of uterus, bone, serum lipids, and hormones in postmenopausal breast cancer patients treated with TAS-108, a novel steroidal antiestrogen: Results of a randomized phase II study.
  • : 1120 Background: TAS-108, a novel steroidal antiestrogen, has demonstrated a favorable safety profile, including lower agonistic activity on uterus than tamoxifen and supportive effect on bone in preclinical studies.
  • The potential tissue-specific effect of TAS-108 was investigated in postmenopausal breast cancer patients included in a randomized phase II study. (The clinical efficacy and safety results were presented at the 31<sup>st</sup> San Antonio Breast Cancer Symposium).
  • METHODS: Postmenopausal women aged 20-80 years with hormone receptor-positive metastatic breast cancer were eligible for this study and treated with oral TAS-108 (40, 80, or 120 mg/day) once a day.
  • Endometrial thickness (ET) was measured by ultrasonography.
  • The change in Bone Mineral Density (BMD) at lumber spine was assessed by dual energy X-ray absorptiometry.
  • Hormone levels, bone metabolism markers, and serum lipid parameters were also measured at regular intervals.
  • TAS-108 did not cause significant endometrial thickening (median baseline ET 3.3 mm, last point ET 3.6 mm; n = 36).
  • In particular, after at least 1 year of treatment in 13 cases, no clinically significant increase in ET was found.
  • Serum carboxy-terminal telopeptide of type I collagen (I CTP) levels remained unchanged although the decrease in osteocalcin levels was significant (p = 0.019; n = 49) in patients without bone metastasis.
  • However, further study in a greater number of cases is needed to identify the effect of the long-term use of TAS-108 on the uterus and bone.

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  • (PMID = 27962233.001).
  • [ISSN] 1527-7755
  • [Journal-full-title] Journal of clinical oncology : official journal of the American Society of Clinical Oncology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] J. Clin. Oncol.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] United States
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37. Oudard S, Janus N, Gligorov J, Beuzeboc P, Ray I, Morere J, Spano J, Pourrat X, Deray G, Launay-Vacher V: Renal function evolution in cancer patients. Results of the IRMA-2 study. J Clin Oncol; 2009 May 20;27(15_suppl):e20574
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  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] Renal function evolution in cancer patients. Results of the IRMA-2 study.
  • : e20574 Background: In 2007, the IRMA-1 study reported the high prevalence of renal insufficiency (RI) in cancer patients.
  • Because of this high frequency, the IRMA-2 study started to investigate the evolution of renal function in cancer patients.
  • METHODS: Data were collected for cancer patients presenting at one of the 19 IRMA-2 centers in March 2005.
  • Data included: sex, age, weight, serum creatinine (SCR), haemoglobinemia, type of tumour, metastasis (bone and/or visceral) anticancer drugs.
  • RESULTS: 4945 cancer patients (breast 1816, colorectal 747, lung 463, ovarian 294, prostate 251) were included in 19 cancer centre in France.
  • CONCLUSIONS: IRMA-2 shows that renal function decreases rapidly in cancer patients with a loss in GFR of more than 3.5 mL/min/1.73m<sup>2</sup> per year.
  • This suggests that cancer patients are more exposed to a deterioration of renal function and that it should be closely monitored with at least a regular estimation of renal function, for instance every 6 months.

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  • (PMID = 27961111.001).
  • [ISSN] 1527-7755
  • [Journal-full-title] Journal of clinical oncology : official journal of the American Society of Clinical Oncology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] J. Clin. Oncol.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] United States
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38. Zurita AJ, Liu G, Hutson T, Kozloff M, Shore N, Wilding G, Logothetis CJ, Chen I, Chow Maneval E, George D: Sunitinib in combination with docetaxel and prednisone in patients (pts) with metastatic hormone-refractory prostate cancer (mHRPC). J Clin Oncol; 2009 May 20;27(15_suppl):5166
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  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] Sunitinib in combination with docetaxel and prednisone in patients (pts) with metastatic hormone-refractory prostate cancer (mHRPC).
  • : 5166 Background: Overexpression of VEGF and PDGF has been implicated in prostate cancer progression and bone metastases.
  • The combination dose was established in phase I (Zurita et al, ECCO. 2007).
  • METHODS: Pts received treatment in a 21-day cycle: sunitinib 37.5 mg/d on days 1-14, docetaxel 75 mg/m<sup>2</sup> on day 1, and prednisone 5 mg BID on days 1-21.
  • Secondary endpoints included tumor response rate (RECIST), safety and patient-reported outcomes.
  • CONCLUSIONS: Sunitinib in combination with docetaxel and prednisone is tolerated and has antitumor activity in pts with mHRPC, as indicated by both PSA and RECIST-defined tumor responses.

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  • (PMID = 27964502.001).
  • [ISSN] 1527-7755
  • [Journal-full-title] Journal of clinical oncology : official journal of the American Society of Clinical Oncology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] J. Clin. Oncol.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] United States
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39. Naito S, Eto M, Shinohara N, Tomita Y, Fujisawa M, Namiki M, Nishikido M, Usami M, Tsukamoto T, Akaza H: A phase II study of S-1 for the treatment of cytokine-refractory metastatic renal cell carcinoma. J Clin Oncol; 2009 May 20;27(15_suppl):5100
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  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] A phase II study of S-1 for the treatment of cytokine-refractory metastatic renal cell carcinoma.
  • The purpose of this study was to evaluate the efficacy and safety of S-1 in cytokine-refractory metastatic renal cell carcinoma (mRCC), and to examine the relation between response and mRNA expression levels of 5-FU-related enzymes.
  • METHODS: Eligible patients had a histologically confirmed diagnosis of clear cell or papillary type of RCC, measurable lesions, treatment histories with cytokines, an ECOG performance status of 0 or 1 (2 was allowed in patients with bone metastasis), an age of at least 20 years, prior nephrectomy, and adequate organ functions.
  • Measurement of the mRNA level of 5-FU-related enzyme in tumors before treatment may facilitate prediction of the response to S-1.

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  • (PMID = 27964380.001).
  • [ISSN] 1527-7755
  • [Journal-full-title] Journal of clinical oncology : official journal of the American Society of Clinical Oncology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] J. Clin. Oncol.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] United States
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40. Palmerini E, Brach Del Prever A, Fagioli F, Luksch R, Prete A, Tamburini A, Abate ME, Picci P, Ferrari S, Tienghi A: High-dose chemotherapy with autologous stem cell transplantation for relapsed Ewing's sarcoma. J Clin Oncol; 2009 May 20;27(15_suppl):10545
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  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • : 10545 Background: Nearly 30-40% of patients with newly diagnosed, non-metastatic Ewing's Sarcoma (EWS) relapse.
  • The role of high-dose chemotherapy (HDCT) with autologous stem cell transplantation (ASCT) is under investigation in metastatic and high risk localized EWS patients.
  • METHODS: All non-metastatic EWS patients treated in Italian Sarcoma Group centers who relapsed between 1999 and June 2008 were offered HDCT (busulfan 4 mg/kg × 4 days orally and melphalan 140 mg/m<sup>2</sup>) with ASCT whenever possible (no previous HDCT; stable or responding disease after standard dose chemotherapy; adequate peripheral blood stem cells harvest).
  • Pattern of relapse was: lung metastases in 20 (28%) patients, bone metastases in 12 (16%), local recurrence in 11 (15%) and multiple sites in 29 (40%).
  • 3-year PRS was better for patients with a lung only relapse [48%, (95%CI 21-74)] and a RFI > 2 years [51%, (95%CI 27-76)].

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  • (PMID = 27963952.001).
  • [ISSN] 1527-7755
  • [Journal-full-title] Journal of clinical oncology : official journal of the American Society of Clinical Oncology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] J. Clin. Oncol.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] United States
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41. Scotte F, Banu E, Medioni J, Boudraoui M, Tourani JM, Banu A, Oudard S: Impact of nail toxicity on survival of patients with hormone-refractory prostate cancer (HRPC) treated with docetaxel. J Clin Oncol; 2009 May 20;27(15_suppl):e16122
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  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] Impact of nail toxicity on survival of patients with hormone-refractory prostate cancer (HRPC) treated with docetaxel.
  • : e16122 Background: Docetaxel is the standard first-line treatment for patients (pts) with metastatic HRPC.
  • METHODS: Eligible HRPC pts included in the current analysis were from a phase II, multicentre, case-control study (Scotte F et al, J Clin Oncol 2005).
  • The median age was 68 years, 91% of pts had bone metastases, 84% had a single metastatic site, 49% had a Gleason score of ≥ 8 and 91% had an ECOG performance status (PS) of 0 or 1.
  • This demonstrates that nail changes in HRPC pts treated with docetaxel are predictive of OS; these findings should be validated in a large cohort of pts.

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  • (PMID = 27963391.001).
  • [ISSN] 1527-7755
  • [Journal-full-title] Journal of clinical oncology : official journal of the American Society of Clinical Oncology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] J. Clin. Oncol.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] United States
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42. Vaishampayan UN, Heilbrun LK, Heath EI, Smith DW, Dickow B, Baranowski K, Powell I, Fontana J: Phase II trial of bevacizumab (B) and oral satraplatin (S) and prednisone in docetaxel pretreated metastatic castrate resistant prostate cancer (CRPC). J Clin Oncol; 2009 May 20;27(15_suppl):e16028
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  • [Title] Phase II trial of bevacizumab (B) and oral satraplatin (S) and prednisone in docetaxel pretreated metastatic castrate resistant prostate cancer (CRPC).
  • : e16028 Background: In metastatic CRPC, second line therapy after docetaxel, remains a currently unmet need.
  • Based on the efficacy and tolerability of S and B in prostate cancer, and the clinical synergy noted between chemotherapy and B, a phase II trial of the combination was conducted.
  • METHODS: Metastatic CRPC patients, with prior docetaxel based chemotherapy were eligible to receive S 80 mg/m2 orally for days 1-5, and B 10 mg/kg on day 1, and 15mg/kg on day 15 of each 35 day cycle.
  • Primary endpoint was time to progression defined as a skeletal event, new areas of metastases on bone scans or per RECIST criteria for measurable disease.
  • 7 (44%) had bone pain, Gleason score of 7 and ≥ 8 in 7 and 12 patients respectively.
  • Measurable disease progression was noted in 5 patients, bone scan progression in 6 patients, progression of both in 3 patients, and PSA only progression in 5 patients.
  • CONCLUSIONS: The combination was well tolerated, and revealed preliminary evidence of clinical efficacy in docetaxel pretreated metastatic CRPC.

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  • (PMID = 27962967.001).
  • [ISSN] 1527-7755
  • [Journal-full-title] Journal of clinical oncology : official journal of the American Society of Clinical Oncology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] J. Clin. Oncol.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] United States
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43. Launay-Vacher V, Janus N, Spano J, Gligorov J, Ray-Coquard I, Beuzeboc P, Morere J, Pourrat X, Deray G, Oudard S: Impact of renal insufficiency on cancer survival: Results of the IRMA-2 study. J Clin Oncol; 2009 May 20;27(15_suppl):9585
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  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] Impact of renal insufficiency on cancer survival: Results of the IRMA-2 study.
  • : 9585 Background: Data are scant on the potential impact of renal insufficiency (RI) on the morbidity and mortality of cancer patients.
  • The IRMA-2 study was started to evaluate the potential association between RI and cancer survival.
  • METHODS: Data were collected for cancer patients presenting at one of the 19 IRMA-2 centers in March 2005.
  • Data included: sex, age, weight, serum creatinine, type of tumour, metastasis (bone and/or visceral).
  • RESULTS: 4267 cancer patients (breast 1601, colorectal 575, lung 407, ovarian 269, prostate 224) with available data (aMDRD and follow-up) were included in the analysis.
  • RI was strongly linked to mortality (p<0.0001), when analysing all type of patients and tumors.
  • When the same analysis was performed for non-metastatic patients (n=2382), RI was also associated with mortality (p<0.0001).
  • Finally, 2 Cox models adjusted for sex, age, and the 5 main types of tumor were associated with a significant increase in the risk of death for patients with aMDRD<60 as compared to patients without ( Table ).
  • CONCLUSIONS: IRMA-2 is the first large scale study reporting an association between RI and a reduced cancer survival.
  • Cancer patients with aMDRD<60 seemed to be more at risk of death for the following 2 years even in non metastatic patients.
  • IRMA-2 underlines that assessing, monitoring and managing renal function in cancer patients is crucial in order to prevent or at least minimise renal dysfunction because of its potential impact on survival.

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  • (PMID = 27963707.001).
  • [ISSN] 1527-7755
  • [Journal-full-title] Journal of clinical oncology : official journal of the American Society of Clinical Oncology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] J. Clin. Oncol.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] United States
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44. Zhang J, Liao M, Niu X, Xiang J, Zhao Y, Chen H, Lu S: Cross-talking between bone marrow-derived cells and lung cancer cells. J Clin Oncol; 2009 May 20;27(15_suppl):e19068
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  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] Cross-talking between bone marrow-derived cells and lung cancer cells.
  • : e19068 Background: Disseminated cancer cells may initially require local nutrients and growth factors to thrive and survive in bone marrow.
  • However, data on the influence of bone marrow derived cells(BMDC, also called bone stromal cells in some publication) on lung cancer cells is largely unexplored.
  • This study is to explore the effect from bone marrow derived cells on biological behavior of lung cancer cells.
  • METHODS: The difference among lung cancer cell lines in their abilities to bone metastasis was tested using SCID animal model.
  • Supernatant of bone marrow aspiration(BM) and condition medium from human bone stromal cells(BSC) were used to study the activity of bone stromal factors.
  • Affymetrix gene chip U133A 2.0 was used to study the gene expression profile of H460 cells, after exposure to secreted proteins from bone stromal cells.
  • RESULTS: In accordance with other literature repors, H460 was found with high bone metastasis potential, while SPC-A1 and A549 cells were low bone metastasis lung cancer cells.
  • We found bone stromal factors significantly increased the proliferation, invasion, adhesion and expression of angiogenosis-related factors, and inhibited the apoptosis for high bone metastasis H460 lung cancer cells.
  • These biologic effects were not seen in SPC-A1 or A549 cells, which are low bone metastasis lung cancer cells.
  • Adhesion of H460 cells to bone stromal cells consistently up-regulated 31 genes.
  • Ontoexpress software showed main function of 31 genes were associated with signal transduction pathways(5 genes), and adhesion molecule(5 genes), including integrin b3 and ADAMTS-1, two potential targets related with bone metastasis.
  • CONCLUSIONS: We concluded bone marrow derived cells had a profound effect on biological behavior of lung cancers, therefore favoring the growth of lung cancer cells in bone.

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  • (PMID = 27962143.001).
  • [ISSN] 1527-7755
  • [Journal-full-title] Journal of clinical oncology : official journal of the American Society of Clinical Oncology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] J. Clin. Oncol.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] United States
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45. Humphreys MR, Ma C, Sridhar SS: Impact of age at diagnosis on survival of hormone-refractory prostate cancer (HRPC) patients. J Clin Oncol; 2009 May 20;27(15_suppl):e16050
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  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] Impact of age at diagnosis on survival of hormone-refractory prostate cancer (HRPC) patients.
  • Bivariate Cox Proportional-Hazards regression was used to test the association of age at diagnosis while adjusting for a covariate, with significant covariates entered into multivariate models.
  • Pts <55 and ≥75 presented with advanced stage at diagnosis and progressed to bone metastasis earlier.
  • Pts ≥75 had decreased performance status, more comorbidities, higher PSA at diagnosis, shorter duration of hormone sensitive disease, and were less likely to receive chemotherapy than pts <75.
  • In multivariate analysis with age as a categorical variate, ECOG 3-4 (HR 2.65), time from diagnosis to both HRPC (HR 0.78) and bone metastasis (HR 0.80), and duration of response to androgen ablation (HR 0.86) remained highly predictive.
  • CONCLUSIONS: Age at diagnosis influences OS in HRPC with a bimodal survival curve.

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  • (PMID = 27962997.001).
  • [ISSN] 1527-7755
  • [Journal-full-title] Journal of clinical oncology : official journal of the American Society of Clinical Oncology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] J. Clin. Oncol.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] United States
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46. Yong M, Jensen AØ, Jacobsen JB, Nørgaard M, Fryzek JP, Sørensen HT: Survival associated with bone metastases and skeletal-related events in breast cancer patients: A population-based cohort study in Denmark (1999 - 2007). J Clin Oncol; 2009 May 20;27(15_suppl):e22210
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  • [Title] Survival associated with bone metastases and skeletal-related events in breast cancer patients: A population-based cohort study in Denmark (1999 - 2007).
  • : e22210 Background: Breast cancer (BrCa) is the most commonly diagnosed cancer for women in the industrialized world.
  • Among women who present with metastatic BrCa, more than half will develop bone metastases.
  • Bone metastases increase the risk for skeletal-related events (SREs) defined as radiation to bone, pathologic fractures, spinal cord compression, surgery to bone, or change in antineoplastic therapy to treat bone pain.
  • We evaluated survival among BrCa patients without bone metastases, with bone metastases, and with both bone metastases and SREs.
  • Patients with a diagnosis of BrCa from January 1, 1999 through December 31, 2007 were identified using the International Classification of Diseases, 10<sup>th</sup> Revision (ICD-10) codes C50.x.
  • SREs after BrCa diagnosis were identified using the ICD-10 code C79.5.
  • Cox proportional-hazards regression was used to estimate the mortality rate ratio (MRR), adjusting for age and comorbidity, to compare survival among three subgroups of BrCa patients: no bone metastases, bone metastases, and bone metastases with SREs.
  • Of these, 621 (7%) developed bone metastases and 267 (3%) developed both bone metastases and SREs during the study period.
  • The 5-year mortality rates among BrCa patients without bone metastases, with bone metastases, and with bone metastases and SREs were 50.7 per 1,000 person-years (PYs), 469 per 1,000 PYs, and 712 per 1,000 PYs, respectively.
  • Compared to BrCa patients without bone metastases, the adjusted MRRs among BrCa patients with bone metastases and patients with bone metastases and SREs were 11.6 [95% confidence interval (CI): 10.9 - 13.6] and 18.1 (95% CI: 15.5 - 21.0), respectively.
  • CONCLUSIONS: Our results suggest that bone metastases and SREs have a major impact on the overall mortality of BrCa patients in Denmark.

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  • (PMID = 27964165.001).
  • [ISSN] 1527-7755
  • [Journal-full-title] Journal of clinical oncology : official journal of the American Society of Clinical Oncology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] J. Clin. Oncol.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] United States
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47. El Ayass W, Sereika S, Van Londen G, Brufsky A: Predictors of progression of bone metastases in breast cancer patients. J Clin Oncol; 2009 May 20;27(15_suppl):e12011
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  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] Predictors of progression of bone metastases in breast cancer patients.
  • : e12011 Background: Breast cancer is mostly diagnosed in elderly women aged >= 65 years and they constitute about 41% of all newly diagnosed cases.
  • Bone metastases is a very common event in these patients especially those with estrogen receptor positive subtypes.Our aim is to identify factors that may be associated with progression of bone metastases in breast bancer (BC) patients with bone metastases only.
  • METHODS: Retrospective review of medical records of 50 females with breast cancer with only bone metastases evaluated at Magee Womens Hospital in Pittsburgh, Pennsyvlania, between June 1998 and September 2007.
  • Patients' progression of their bone disease was followed based on serial bone scans.
  • Candidate predictors considered included: age at breast cancer diagnosis (as a continuous variable and dichotomized at 60 years), age at metastatic BC diagnosis (as a continuous variable and dichotomized at 60 years), time elapsed between breast cancer diagnosis, and metastatic BC diagnosis, ER status, PR status, ER/PR status, HER-2 status, use of radiation, type of bisphosphonate used (since all but two patients had this: aredia use, zometa use), type of disease (IDC, ILC), and stage of disease (I, II, III, IV).
  • Marginal modeling using generalized estimating equations assuming a binomial error distribution was used considering potential candidate predictor variables univariately and then multivariately to identify predictors of progression of bone metastases at a significance level of 0.05.
  • RESULTS: Based on the univariate analysis, age at BC diagnosis (p = 0.03), age at metastatic BC diagnosis (p = 0.03), and being ER+ or PR+ (p = 0.04) were positively predictive of progression, with the latter two being also jointly significant in multivariate analysis.
  • CONCLUSION: We found that age as a continuous variable and ER/PR + were positive predictors of progression of bone metastases in BC patients.

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  • (PMID = 27964241.001).
  • [ISSN] 1527-7755
  • [Journal-full-title] Journal of clinical oncology : official journal of the American Society of Clinical Oncology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] J. Clin. Oncol.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] United States
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48. Fryzek JP, Cetin K, Nørgaard M, Jensen AØ, Jacobsen J, Sørensen HT: The prognostic significance of bone metastases and skeletal-related events (SREs) in prostate cancer survival: A population-based historical cohort study in Denmark (1999-2007). J Clin Oncol; 2009 May 20;27(15_suppl):5160
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  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] The prognostic significance of bone metastases and skeletal-related events (SREs) in prostate cancer survival: A population-based historical cohort study in Denmark (1999-2007).
  • : 5160 Background: Common among advanced prostate cancer patients, bone metastases indicate cancer progression and poor prognosis but few studies have quantified their influence on patient survival, particularly in the presence of subsequent skeletal-related complications.
  • We therefore sought to examine this in a large population-based cohort of prostate cancer patients.
  • METHODS: Using data from the Danish National Patient Registry (covering all Danish hospitals), we studied 23,087 patients diagnosed with prostate cancer between 1999 and 2007, with follow-up through April 2008 (median follow-up: 2.2 years).
  • We estimated the incidence of bone metastases following cancer diagnosis and the subsequent occurrence of SREs (radiation and surgery to the bone, fracture, spinal cord compression).
  • We then computed and compared survival for three prostate cancer subgroups - no bone metastases, bone metastases, and bone metastases with SREs - using Kaplan-Meier and multivariate Cox proportional hazards models.
  • RESULTS: Across the study period, 14% (n = 3,261) of the prostate cancer patients developed bone metastases: 6.8% (n = 1,570) had bone metastases and no SRE and 7.3% (n = 1,691) had both bone metastases and at least one SRE (radiation to the bone was most frequent).
  • One-year survival was lowest for prostate cancer patients with bone metastases and SREs (40%) compared to the groups with no bone metastases (87%) and with bone metastases but no SREs (47%).
  • Similarly, after adjusting for age and the presence of comorbidities, short-term prognosis was poorest in patients with both bone metastases and SREs: compared to prostate cancer patients with no bone metastases, the 1-year mortality rate was 6.7 times greater for those with bone metastases and SREs (95% confidence interval (CI): 6.0-7.6) versus just 4.7 times higher in those with only bone metastases (95% CI: 4.3-5.2).
  • Less than 1% of prostate cancer patients who developed bone metastases and suffered any SRE survived beyond five years.
  • CONCLUSIONS: Although the presence of bone metastases confers a short-term prognosis in prostate cancer patients, survival is even poorer for patients who also experience skeletal-related complications.

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  • (PMID = 27964483.001).
  • [ISSN] 1527-7755
  • [Journal-full-title] Journal of clinical oncology : official journal of the American Society of Clinical Oncology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] J. Clin. Oncol.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] United States
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49. Ibrahim T, Sacanna E, Mercatali L, Flamini E, Tison C, Ricci R, Ricci M, Serra P, Scarpi E, Amadori D: Potential usefulness of OPG, a member of the tumor necrosis factor receptor superfamily, for the early diagnosis of bone metastasis in breast cancer patients. J Clin Oncol; 2009 May 20;27(15_suppl):e22000
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  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] Potential usefulness of OPG, a member of the tumor necrosis factor receptor superfamily, for the early diagnosis of bone metastasis in breast cancer patients.
  • : e22000 Background: Breast cancer is the most frequent tumor in women.
  • About 80% of patients with metastatic disease present bone involvement, in which the OPG/RANKL/RANK system would seem to play an important role.
  • Our aim was to evaluate the potential usefulness of OPG bone marker for the early diagnosis of bone metastases.
  • METHODS: The study was carried out on 120 individuals: 30 healthy donors, with a median age of 40 years (21-76) and 90 breast cancer patients, with a median age of 57 years (30-86).
  • Among patients, 49 were disease-free (median age 52 years) and 41 were at first diagnosis of bone metastases (median age 63 years).
  • The OPG median value was not statistically different in healthy donors (median=1.9; range 0.6-4.7) and disease-free patients (median=1.7; range 0.4-8.9), whereas it was threefold higher than that observed in relapsed patients (median=0.6; range 0.1-5.2; p<0.001), regardless of the number of metastatic sites.
  • In a parallel analysis of 37 patients (14 disease-free and 23 with bone metastases) for whom CEA and CA15.3 information was available, specificity for each marker was 100%, whereas sensitivity was only 61% and 59%, respectively.
  • CONCLUSIONS: Our preliminary data show a potential role of the OPG bone turnover marker for the early diagnosis of bone metastases.
  • Results now need to be confirmed in a larger case series.

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  • (PMID = 27963166.001).
  • [ISSN] 1527-7755
  • [Journal-full-title] Journal of clinical oncology : official journal of the American Society of Clinical Oncology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] J. Clin. Oncol.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] United States
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50. Tunn U, Stenzl A, Kindler M, Strauss A, Miller K, Ruebel A, Albrecht M, Gruenwald V: The effect of zoledronic acid on bone metastasis in patients suffering from renal cell cancer (RCC): A German prospective single-arm clinical trial. J Clin Oncol; 2009 May 20;27(15_suppl):5107
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  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] The effect of zoledronic acid on bone metastasis in patients suffering from renal cell cancer (RCC): A German prospective single-arm clinical trial.
  • : 5107 Background: The incidence of RCC increased over the last decades and about 30% of patients will develop bone metastasis.
  • These pts. face considerable skeletal morbidity e.g. bone pain, pathologic fractures, spinal cord compression or tumor induced hypercalcemia (TIH).
  • A prospective trial was initiated in RCC metastatic to bone evaluating the SRE (skeletal related event) rate under therapy with zoledronic acid (ZA).
  • METHODS: Patients with RCC must have had ≥1 bone metastasis and ≤2 prior applications of a bisphosphonate.
  • Bone lesions were diagnosed by bone scan and ≥1 lesion was confirmed using X-ray, CT or MRI. Pts. passed a 12 months treatment period receiving 4 mg ZA every 3 weeks. Pts. were followed every 3 weeks for 54 weeks for development of SREs (radiation or surgery to bone, spinal cord compression, pathologic bone fractures) and TIH.
  • A bone scan was done, if AP or LDH were >2xULN or symptoms occurred.
  • 78% of pts. suffered from ≤6 bone metastases.
  • Bone lesions response was observed in 3 pts. (2 CR, 1 PR) out of 33 pts. currently available.
  • CONCLUSIONS: Pts. with mRCC and bone metastases are at high risk for experiencing an SRE with a reported incidence of up to 74%.
  • This is the first study prospectively evaluating SRE rate in patients with mRCC and bone lesions receiving ZA.

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  • (PMID = 27964367.001).
  • [ISSN] 1527-7755
  • [Journal-full-title] Journal of clinical oncology : official journal of the American Society of Clinical Oncology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] J. Clin. Oncol.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] United States
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51. Broom RJ, Amir E, Cawthorn T, Freedman O, Gianfelice D, Barth D, Galica J, Wang D, Done SJ, Clemons M: Gene expression differences between disseminated tumor cells and tumor cells from overt bone metastases in patients with metastatic breast cancer. J Clin Oncol; 2009 May 20;27(15_suppl):1040
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  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] Gene expression differences between disseminated tumor cells and tumor cells from overt bone metastases in patients with metastatic breast cancer.
  • : 1040 Background: Despite extensive work evaluating molecular differences between primary tumors, circulating tumor cells, disseminated tumor cells (DTCs) and established metastases, it is not apparent which genetic alterations are required to form viable, independent bone metastases (BM).
  • METHODS: Ten breast cancer patients with BM underwent a CT-guided BM biopsy and a bone marrow aspiration (for DTCs).
  • Tumor cells were enriched by immunomagnetic separation and RNA was extracted from each sample.
  • Ingenuity Pathway Analysis software was used to identify genes integral to specific pathways involved in tumor dissemination.
  • RESULTS: The yield of analyzable malignant cells from BM and bone marrow aspirates was 60% and 80%, respectively.
  • Several genes relevant to breast cancer metastasis to bone (i.e., osteopontin, CTGF, parathyroid hormone receptor, EGFR) were significantly over-expressed in the BM compared to the DTCs.
  • CONCLUSIONS: Results suggest that there are specific subsets of genes, which are required for DTCs in the bone marrow to form overt BM.
  • A number of genes identified are already known to participate in osteolytic BM formation.

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  • (PMID = 27961118.001).
  • [ISSN] 1527-7755
  • [Journal-full-title] Journal of clinical oncology : official journal of the American Society of Clinical Oncology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] J. Clin. Oncol.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] United States
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52. Aksoy S, Dizdar Ö, Turgut D, Sener Dede D, Arslan Ç, Harputluoglu H, Altundag K: Zoledronic acid and atrial fibrillation in cancer patients with bone metastases. J Clin Oncol; 2009 May 20;27(15_suppl):e20591
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  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] Zoledronic acid and atrial fibrillation in cancer patients with bone metastases.
  • : e20591 Background: Treatment with a bisphosphonate was linked with a significantly increased risk for atrial fibrillation (AF) in a few studies.
  • This study was conducted to determine the frequency of atrial fibrillation among cancer patients receiving the standard treatment of ZA.
  • METHODS: One hundred and twenty-four cancer patients who had bone metastasis receiving ZA were included in this study.
  • RESULTS: One hundred and twenty-four cancer patients with documented bone metastases were evaluated.
  • Forty-one percent of the patients had breast cancer and 17% non-small cell lung cancer and the remainder had other solid tumors.
  • CONCLUSIONS: Although most of the patients were also having potentially cardiotoxic treatment, there was no increase in AF frequency in cancer patients who were treated with intravenous ZA.

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  • (PMID = 27961171.001).
  • [ISSN] 1527-7755
  • [Journal-full-title] Journal of clinical oncology : official journal of the American Society of Clinical Oncology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] J. Clin. Oncol.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] United States
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53. Botteman MF, Kaura S: Cost-effectiveness of zoledronic acid in the prevention of skeletal-related events in patients with bone metastases from renal cell carcinoma: Comparison between France, Germany, and the United Kingdom. J Clin Oncol; 2009 May 20;27(15_suppl):5106
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  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] Cost-effectiveness of zoledronic acid in the prevention of skeletal-related events in patients with bone metastases from renal cell carcinoma: Comparison between France, Germany, and the United Kingdom.
  • : 5106 Background: Zoledronic acid (ZOL) significantly reduces the risk of new skeletal-related events (SREs) in patients (pts) with bone metastases from RCC.
  • METHODS: This analysis was based on a retrospective analysis of RCC pts with bone metastases who were enrolled in a 9-mo trial of ZOL or placebo (PBO) plus concomitant antineoplastic therapy.
  • The model included data and assumptions regarding SRE incidence, mortality, drug and administration costs, SRE costs, reduced quality of life (QOL) because of SREs and bone pain, and therapy duration.
  • SRE costs were estimated using diagnosis-related group tariff information and published literature.
  • ZOL resulted in a cost per QALY gained < 30,000 in approximately 93% of cases.
  • CONCLUSIONS: Treatment with ZOL reduces SREs, improves QOL, and lowers health-related costs compared with PBO in French, German, and UK pts with bone metastases from RCC.

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  • (PMID = 27964368.001).
  • [ISSN] 1527-7755
  • [Journal-full-title] Journal of clinical oncology : official journal of the American Society of Clinical Oncology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] J. Clin. Oncol.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] United States
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54. Sahi C, Knox JJ, Hinder V, Deva S, Cole D, Clemons M, Broom RJ: The effects of sorafenib and sunitinib on bone turnover markers in patients with bone metastases from renal cell carcinoma. J Clin Oncol; 2009 May 20;27(15_suppl):e16145
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  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] The effects of sorafenib and sunitinib on bone turnover markers in patients with bone metastases from renal cell carcinoma.
  • : e16145 Background: Bone metastases (BM) from renal cell carcinoma (RCC) are common and associated with poor outcomes.
  • While the multi-tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKI's) sunitinib and sorafenib have advanced the treatment of metastatic RCC, their efficacy on BM is unknown.
  • Urinary N-telopeptide (uNTX) is a marker of bone turnover measured in nmol/mmol creatinine.
  • In this pilot biomarker study we sought to prospectively evaluate the effects on BM of these multi-TKI's in RCC patients.
  • Patients also completed pain (including bone pain) and quality of life questionnaires.
  • CONCLUSIONS: In patients with BM from RCC and at least moderately elevated uNTX levels at baseline, these multi-TKI's show a significant trend to decrease uNTX levels, but perhaps not as effectively as bone-specific therapies (e.g. bisphosphonates) do in other malignancies.
  • This pilot data raises questions about the activity of the multi-TKI's in BM from RCC and further research is needed.

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  • (PMID = 27963429.001).
  • [ISSN] 1527-7755
  • [Journal-full-title] Journal of clinical oncology : official journal of the American Society of Clinical Oncology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] J. Clin. Oncol.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] United States
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55. Sima L, Yin C: Efficacy of electroacupuncture for bone metastatic cancer patients with neuropathic pain: A randomized controlled trial. J Clin Oncol; 2009 May 20;27(15_suppl):9534
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  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] Efficacy of electroacupuncture for bone metastatic cancer patients with neuropathic pain: A randomized controlled trial.
  • : 9534 Background: Bone metastatic lung cancer or breast cancer pts often have neuropathic pain which has poor reaction to opioids.
  • A clinical trial is to investigate efficacy of electroacupuncture (EA) in cancer pts with neuropathic pain.
  • METHODS: Inclusion criteria were: bone metastatic lung cancer or breast cancer pts at least one of the symptoms as burning pain, shooting pain, dysesthesias, or allodynia; numerical rating scale (NRS) of pain intensity >=4.0; stable dose of opioids for at least 72 hours.
  • RESULTS: Ninety pts with neuropathic pain participated in a randomized, controlled design trial from 2006 to 2008.
  • Functional Assessment of Cancer Therapy-General (FACT-G) scale had no difference at the beginning, while it were 102±18 and 85±12 in EA group and controlled at the end of survey, p < 0.0001.
  • CONCLUSIONS: EA can alleviate neuropathic pain of bone metastatic cancer pts, decrease the analgesics consumption, and promoting quality of life.

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  • (PMID = 27964531.001).
  • [ISSN] 1527-7755
  • [Journal-full-title] Journal of clinical oncology : official journal of the American Society of Clinical Oncology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] J. Clin. Oncol.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] United States
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56. Farrand E, Ferrante L, Staron RB, Brown RS Jr, Siegel AB: Radiologic detection of bone metastasis in patients with hepatocellular carcinoma: A single-center experience. J Clin Oncol; 2009 May 20;27(15_suppl):e15644
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  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] Radiologic detection of bone metastasis in patients with hepatocellular carcinoma: A single-center experience.
  • : e15644 Background: We investigated current practices and their relative abilities to effectively screen for and detect bone metastases (mets).
  • It is unknown what percentage of HCC bone mets are blastic versus lytic, and what imaging modality best identifies them.
  • Primary outcomes were the percentage of lytic lesions, and the sensitivity and specificity of bone scans in detecting bone mets.
  • Mean age at diagnosis was 60 years; 80% were male, and hepatitis C was the most common etiology of HCC (58%).
  • 54% of all patients received bone scans.
  • 5% of all patients were diagnosed with bone mets (n=24), of which 42% were diagnosed at presentation, 20% during continued follow-up, and 38% during post-operative surveillance.
  • 96% of all bone lesions were lytic, of which 13% were undetected by bone scan (sensitivity = 79%, specificity = 98%).
  • None of the lesions were blastic and 4% remained indeterminate after independent review with an attending bone radiologist.
  • Of those patients who underwent resection or liver transplantation (n=205) 35 patients recurred (31% with bone recurrence and 6% with bone mets as their only site of disease).
  • Within this surgical group, patients with bone mets only had higher 1,3,and 5 year survival rates compared to patients with other extrahepatic lesions, although only significant for 3 year survival (p=0.013).
  • 4 of the 24 patients with bone mets received a biopsy.
  • All 4 confirmed metastatic HCC.
  • CONCLUSIONS: Due to the high specificity, bone scans serve as a good initial screening test to rule out bone mets in the HCC population.
  • However in populations at higher risk of presenting with bone mets (post-tranplantation/resection) a more sensitive test may be needed.
  • Additional studies are warranted to determine whether other modalities, such as PET/CT or skeletal survey, are more sensitive tests for the detection of bone mets.

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  • (PMID = 27962738.001).
  • [ISSN] 1527-7755
  • [Journal-full-title] Journal of clinical oncology : official journal of the American Society of Clinical Oncology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] J. Clin. Oncol.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] United States
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57. Xi-Chun H, Zhao X, Xu X, Guo H, Wang Z, Guo X, Chen J, Wu J, Shao Z, Li J, Zhu B: Effect of metronomic use of zoledronic acid (ZOL) on antitumor and antiosteoclastic effects in breast cancer patients with bone metastasis. J Clin Oncol; 2009 May 20;27(15_suppl):e14603
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  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] Effect of metronomic use of zoledronic acid (ZOL) on antitumor and antiosteoclastic effects in breast cancer patients with bone metastasis.
  • However, the pharmacokinetics of the drug in breast cancer patients remains to be elucidated and optimized.
  • METHODS: Sixty breast cancer patients with bone metastases were recruited in this randomized phase II clinical study.
  • During the first month after initial infusion of ZOL, serial blood samples were collected on day 1, 15 and 29 measuring markers for bone resorption (NTx), angiogenesis (VEGF), and tumor burden (CEA and CA15-3).
  • RESULTS: Compared to a single-dose administration, weekly low dose of ZOL resulted in a greater reduction in serum levels of VEGF and NTx, with a significant trend over time during one month observation.

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  • (PMID = 27964149.001).
  • [ISSN] 1527-7755
  • [Journal-full-title] Journal of clinical oncology : official journal of the American Society of Clinical Oncology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] J. Clin. Oncol.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] United States
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58. Wang Y, Liu D, Chang B, Kao R, Lai Y, Hsu W: A comparison between treatment outcomes of stage III and stage IV esophageal squamous cell carcinoma without visceral or bone metastases. J Clin Oncol; 2009 May 20;27(15_suppl):e15659
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  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] A comparison between treatment outcomes of stage III and stage IV esophageal squamous cell carcinoma without visceral or bone metastases.
  • : e15659 Background: Although classified as end-stage, patients of stage IV esophageal squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) without visceral or bone metastases (nodal stage IV) often have good performance status and are medically fit for curative treatment.
  • The only significant poor prognostic factor in both univariate and multivariate analyses was tumor length longer than 5 cm.

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  • (PMID = 27962775.001).
  • [ISSN] 1527-7755
  • [Journal-full-title] Journal of clinical oncology : official journal of the American Society of Clinical Oncology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] J. Clin. Oncol.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] United States
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59. Pandey R, Dey S, Mukhopadhyay A: The better bisphosphonate in patients with bone metastasis: Zoledronic acid or ibandronic acid? A study from Eastern India. J Clin Oncol; 2009 May 20;27(15_suppl):e20524
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  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] The better bisphosphonate in patients with bone metastasis: Zoledronic acid or ibandronic acid? A study from Eastern India.
  • This study was designed to study superiority or inferiority of either agent over other in terms of efficacy in reducing bone pain and complications in patients with bone metastases.
  • METHODS: From Jan 2005 to Dec 2008, 240 patients of various malignancies with bone metatstasis were enrolled and were randomized on a 1:1 basis to receive monthly IV infusions of ibandronate or zoledronate and were analysed for pain relief, skeletal related events and adverse events.
  • RESULTS: Patients in both the arms were well matched for their diagnosis, stage of disease, burden of skeletal disease and performance status.
  • This study also indicates that it may be slightly better than ibandronate in reducing bone pain and preventing skeletal related events.

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  • (PMID = 27961007.001).
  • [ISSN] 1527-7755
  • [Journal-full-title] Journal of clinical oncology : official journal of the American Society of Clinical Oncology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] J. Clin. Oncol.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] United States
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60. Brown JE, Lipton A, Cook RJ, Michaelson D, Coleman RE, Saad F: Correlation of N-telopeptide of type I collagen (NTX) with survival and fractures in patients (pts) with bone metastases from renal cell carcinoma (RCC). J Clin Oncol; 2009 May 20;27(15_suppl):e16016
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  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] Correlation of N-telopeptide of type I collagen (NTX) with survival and fractures in patients (pts) with bone metastases from renal cell carcinoma (RCC).
  • : e16016 Background: The osteolysis marker NTX has shown prognostic significance in pts with bone metastases from a broad range of solid tumors, but its potential in pts with RCC has not been investigated.
  • METHODS: This was an exploratory correlative analysis of NTX levels and outcomes in the RCC subset of pts treated with zoledronic acid (ZOL) in a 21-month phase III trial (Rosen et al.
  • Endpoints included overall survival (OS), disease progression in bone, and pathologic fractures.
  • An elevated recent NTX measurement correlated with a > 13-fold increased risk of death and a > 11-fold increased risk of progression in bone.
  • Although based on a small sample size, correlations between recent NTX levels and outcomes in RCC pts are more profound than those previously reported in pts with other solid tumors (Brown et al.
  • J Natl Cancer Inst. 2005).
  • Elevated NTX could alert physicians to the need to more closely monitor bone lesions and intervene to prevent fractures in RCC pts.

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  • (PMID = 27962910.001).
  • [ISSN] 1527-7755
  • [Journal-full-title] Journal of clinical oncology : official journal of the American Society of Clinical Oncology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] J. Clin. Oncol.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] United States
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61. Howell DD, James JL, Hartsell WF, Suntharalingam M, Machtay M, Suh JH, Demas WF, Sandler HM, Kachnic LA, Berk LB: Randomized trial of short-course versus long-course radiotherapy for palliation of painful vertebral bone metastases: A retrospective analysis of RTOG 97-14. J Clin Oncol; 2009 May 20;27(15_suppl):9521
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  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] Randomized trial of short-course versus long-course radiotherapy for palliation of painful vertebral bone metastases: A retrospective analysis of RTOG 97-14.
  • : 9521 Background: RTOG 97-14 [Hartsell et al, breast/prostate cancer patients (pts) with painful bone metastases randomized to 8 Gy/1 fraction or 30 Gy/10 fractions], revealed no difference in pain relief or narcotic use 3 months post randomization.
  • Single 8 Gy fractions for painful vertebral bone mets have not been well accepted, possibly due to provider concerns about efficacy and toxicity.
  • The present study evaluates treatment differences in the subset of pts treated specifically for painful vertebral bone mets (PVBM).
  • 8 Gy had less acute toxicity, and a higher need for retreatment than 30 Gy.

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  • (PMID = 27964506.001).
  • [ISSN] 1527-7755
  • [Journal-full-title] Journal of clinical oncology : official journal of the American Society of Clinical Oncology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] J. Clin. Oncol.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] United States
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62. Secter M, MacKenzie MJ, O'Brien P, Whiston F: Skeletal related events in patients with metastatic renal cell carcinoma: A retrospective review. J Clin Oncol; 2009 May 20;27(15_suppl):e16118
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  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] Skeletal related events in patients with metastatic renal cell carcinoma: A retrospective review.
  • : e16118 Background: Approximately one third of patients with renal cell carcinoma (RCC) will develop bone metastases during the course of their disease.
  • Previous studies suggest that the rate of skeletal related events (SREs) in patients with metastatic renal cell carcinoma is high, and that bisphosphonate therapy can lower the rate of SREs.
  • We conducted a retrospective review of patients with metastatic renal cell carcinoma and bone metastases seen at our academic cancer centre.
  • METHODS: After approval by the Research Ethics Board, a retrospective review of all patients seen at the London Regional Cancer Centre with a diagnosis of RCC between January 2006 and December 2008 was performed.
  • Data points collected included the number of patients with bone metastases, number of SREs, length of hospital stay, and treatments related to SREs.
  • A SRE was defined as one of the following: pathologic fracture, spinal cord compression, radiotherapy or surgery to bone, or hypercalcemia in the presence of bone metastases.
  • RESULTS: 196 patients with metastatic RCC were identified.
  • Of these, 63 (32%) had bone metastases.
  • 75% of these patients with bone metastases received medical therapies including sunitinib, sorafenib or temsirolimus.
  • Common sites of metastases were vertebra (66%), pelvis (50%), and femur (42%).
  • Of those with bone metastases, 61 (95%) experienced at least one SRE.
  • 42% sustained a pathologic fracture; 28% suffered a spinal cord compression or cauda equina syndrome; 22% had surgery for bone metastases; 87.5% required radiotherapy and 27% had hypercalcemia.
  • CONCLUSIONS: Despite significant recent improvements in the overall care of RCC, and expansion of the number of therapeutic options, bone metastases and consequent SREs continue to cause significant morbidity.
  • Our rate of SREs is actually higher than that documented in the placebo arm of a randomized trial of a bisphosphonate in RCC from the pre-tyrosine kinase era.
  • Bone-related morbidity in mRCC remains a clinical problem with a significant unmet medical need.

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  • (PMID = 27963309.001).
  • [ISSN] 1527-7755
  • [Journal-full-title] Journal of clinical oncology : official journal of the American Society of Clinical Oncology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] J. Clin. Oncol.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] United States
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63. Russell H, DeClerck Y, Ara T, Groshen S, Villablanca JG, Marachelian A, Park J, Katzenstein H, Matthay K, Blaney S: A phase I study of zoledronic acid (ZA) and low-dose cyclophosphamide (CTX) in children with recurrent/refractory neuroblastoma (NB): A New Approaches to Neuroblastoma Therapy (NANT) study. J Clin Oncol; 2009 May 20;27(15_suppl):10022
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  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • : 10022 Background: ZA, a bisphosphonate, delays progression of bone metastases in adult malignancies.
  • Bone metastases occur in 60% of children with advanced NB.
  • A xenograft mouse model demonstrated ZA with low dose chemotherapy delayed progression of NB bone lesions prompting a phase I trial of ZA.
  • METHODS: Three dose levels of intravenous ZA (2, 3, or 4 mg/m2) administered every 28 days were evaluated with continuous daily oral CTX (25 mg/m2/day) in patients with recurrent/refractory NB and bone metastases.

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  • (PMID = 27962625.001).
  • [ISSN] 1527-7755
  • [Journal-full-title] Journal of clinical oncology : official journal of the American Society of Clinical Oncology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] J. Clin. Oncol.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] United States
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64. Eisenberger MA, Lin J, Sinibaldi VJ, Carducci MA, Denmeade S, DeWeese T, Song D: Phase I trial with a combination of docetaxel and &lt;sup&gt;153&lt;/sup&gt;Sm- EDTMP in patients (pts) with castration-resistant metastatic prostate cancer (mCRPC). J Clin Oncol; 2009 May 20;27(15_suppl):5155
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  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] Phase I trial with a combination of docetaxel and <sup>153</sup>Sm- EDTMP in patients (pts) with castration-resistant metastatic prostate cancer (mCRPC).
  • : 5155 Background: Bone targeted therapy holds great promise for improving outcomes in mCRPC.
  • METHODS: mCRPC pts with progressive bone metastases were treated in 4 cohorts ( CH).
  • Previous Tax and palliative RT to bone was admissible.
  • Disease status was assessed (with bone /CT scans and PSA) after every cycle.
  • RESULTS: Thirteen pts with progressive bone metastases were enrolled.
  • Median time to disease progression was 147 days (range 72 days - 10 months<sup>+</sup>); 6/13 (46%) pts had stable/improved bone scans at 6 months and 8/8 (100%) symptomatic pts had improvement in pain.
  • CONCLUSIONS: Concurrent 6-month administration of 2 and possibly 3 full dose /standard schedule of Tax with 2 full doses of Sm is feasible with reversible bone marrow suppression.
  • The combination may provide additional clinical benefits for mCRPC pts with extensive bone metastasis.

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  • (PMID = 27964475.001).
  • [ISSN] 1527-7755
  • [Journal-full-title] Journal of clinical oncology : official journal of the American Society of Clinical Oncology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] J. Clin. Oncol.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] United States
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65. Bertulli R, Fumagalli E, Coco P, Messina A, Morosi C, Dileo P, Casali PG: Unusual metastatic sites in gastrointestinal stromal tumor (GIST). J Clin Oncol; 2009 May 20;27(15_suppl):10566
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  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] Unusual metastatic sites in gastrointestinal stromal tumor (GIST).
  • : 10566 Background: Metastases from GIST usually affect liver and peritoneum.
  • Extra-abdominal metastases may occur in a limited proportion of pts.
  • Only anecdotal reports describe rare metastatic sites (MS), to lungs, bone and distant soft tissues.
  • METHODS: We reviewed a group of 278 pts with advanced/metastatic GIST treated with tyrosine kinase inhibitors over a 7 years period with a view to unusual MS.
  • RESULTS: Thirteen pts (5%), M/F:10/3, median age 50 yrs (34-68 y), developed uncommon MS in a median time of 42 months from their primary diagnosis (0-120 m).
  • Nine pts showed bone metastases along with peritoneal and/or hepatic lesions.
  • In addition to these 9 pts with bone plus other metastases, other two pts had an histologically confirmed bone recurrence as the only metastatization site.
  • In 4 pts, bone metastases were histologically confirmed.
  • In the others, imaging and evidence of progression elsewhere were used as clinical criteria for diagnosis of bone metastatization.
  • With regard to all pts, the most frequent bone sites were spine and pelvis, while ribs and femurs were rare.
  • Nine pts died of disease progression after a median time of 17 months (3-40 m) from bone metastases diagnosis.
  • Two pts with a single bone lesion are alive and still on imatinib treatment.
  • Finally, one pt had mediastinal, retrorbital and brain lesions in addition to abdominal metastases, after therapy with imatinib and PTK787.
  • Last pt died in few months after parotid gland and subcutaneous metastases diagnosis.
  • This is likely to result in a higher number of unusual MS, as observed in other tumors responding to medical therapies in their advanced stages.

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  • (PMID = 27963787.001).
  • [ISSN] 1527-7755
  • [Journal-full-title] Journal of clinical oncology : official journal of the American Society of Clinical Oncology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] J. Clin. Oncol.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] United States
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66. Stephens J, Kaura S, Botteman MF: Cost-effectiveness of zoledronic acid versus placebo in the management of skeletal metastases in lung cancer patients (LC pts): Comparison across three European countries. J Clin Oncol; 2009 May 20;27(15_suppl):8081
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  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] Cost-effectiveness of zoledronic acid versus placebo in the management of skeletal metastases in lung cancer patients (LC pts): Comparison across three European countries.
  • : 8081 Background: Zoledronic acid (ZOL) reduces the risk of skeletal-related events (SREs) in LC pts with bone metastases.
  • METHODS: Estimated direct costs and quality-adjusted life-years (QALYs) experienced by LC pts with bone metastases receiving placebo (PBO) or ZOL were modeled and compared.
  • Overall survival (OS), SRE incidence, and number of infusions administered were obtained from a 21-mo randomized clinical trial comparing the proportion of pts who experienced an on-study SRE with 4 mg ZOL or PBO every 3 wk (Rosen et al. JCO. 2003).
  • Costs of treatments and SREs were estimated using national reimbursement listings (eg, diagnosis-related groups), private databases, and published literature.
  • Use of ZOL resulted in a net increase of 0.017 QALY/pt vs PBO.
  • CONCLUSIONS: ZOL leads to fewer SREs, better estimated QOL, and lower estimated costs relative to PBO in German, French, and UK LC pts with bone metastases.

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  • (PMID = 27962656.001).
  • [ISSN] 1527-7755
  • [Journal-full-title] Journal of clinical oncology : official journal of the American Society of Clinical Oncology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] J. Clin. Oncol.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] United States
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67. Scruggs KV, Pradhan SM, Mfalila C, Moore D, Burrows E, Drobish A, Carey L: Differential timing and patterns of recurrence among breast cancer subtypes. J Clin Oncol; 2009 May 20;27(15_suppl):1076
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  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] Differential timing and patterns of recurrence among breast cancer subtypes.
  • : 1076 Background: At present, effects of heterogeneity among breast cancer subtypes on timing and patterns of relapse are not fully understood.
  • We characterized timing and patterns of distant recurrence among subtypes in women followed from initial diagnosis of breast cancer.
  • METHODS: 345 pts with newly diagnosed predominantly stage II-III breast cancer were treated with multiagent neoadjuvant therapy and subtyped by IHC: LumA (ER/PR+, HER2-); LumB (-ER/PR+, HER2+); Basal (triple neg); HER2 (HER2+,ER/PR-).
  • Site-specific patterns of distant metastasis (DM) were examined among pts with single site of first DM.
  • Sites of relapse were bone, CNS, viscera, lymph node, and soft tissue.
  • Time to progression (TTP) was from date of initial diagnosis.
  • RESULTS: 108 patients developed metastatic disease; 65 demonstrated a single site of first DM.
  • Basal subtype was associated with greater CNS and visceral metastases and fewer bone metastases than other subtypes.
  • LumA subtype was associated with fewer CNS and greater bone metastases than other subtypes. [See table].
  • Dichotomizing as Basal v. non-Basal, bone v. no bone and CNS v. no CNS revealed identical trends with increased significance (p=0.01-0.03).
  • Excluding pts with DM at diagnosis, TTP differed between Basals and non-Basals within viscera (p=0.002, n=14/21, median TTP=10/21); CNS (p=0.047, n=8/7, median TTP=11/27); and bone (p=0.002, n=8/31, median TTP=9/21).
  • CONCLUSIONS: Subtypes exhibit distinct timing and patterns of relapse within this largely homogeneous cohort of pts with predominantly locally advanced breast cancer, despite modern multiagent neoadjuvant therapy.
  • Specifically, Basal cancers exhibit earlier recurrence and greater involvement of sites more difficult to treat than non-Basals.
  • Within individual sites TTP differences between Basal and non-Basal tumors persist and are even more pronounced, suggesting that tumor microenvironment does not appear to be driving these differences.

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  • (PMID = 27961190.001).
  • [ISSN] 1527-7755
  • [Journal-full-title] Journal of clinical oncology : official journal of the American Society of Clinical Oncology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] J. Clin. Oncol.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] United States
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68. Visa L, Pineda E, Farrus B, Codony-Servat J, Filella X, Albiol S, Martinez A, Domingo-Domench JM, Gascon P, Mellado B: Correlation of serum interleukin-6 (IL-6) levels and clinical outcome in hormone-independent (HI) prostate cancer (PC) patients (PTS) treated with docetaxel. J Clin Oncol; 2009 May 20;27(15_suppl):e16044
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  • [Title] Correlation of serum interleukin-6 (IL-6) levels and clinical outcome in hormone-independent (HI) prostate cancer (PC) patients (PTS) treated with docetaxel.
  • We previously reported preliminary data on the correlation of serum IL-6 and D response in metastatic HI PC pts.
  • Evaluated variables were age, performance status, PSA, Gleason, number (n) of D cycles, time to HI progression, presence of visceral metastasis, n of bone metastasis, hemoglobin, lactate deshydrogenase and alkaline phosphatase.
  • In the multivariate analysis, serum IL-6 (p=0.002), n of bone metastasis (p=0.008) and n of D cycles (p=0.002), were independent prognostic factor for OS and PC SpS.

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  • (PMID = 27963018.001).
  • [ISSN] 1527-7755
  • [Journal-full-title] Journal of clinical oncology : official journal of the American Society of Clinical Oncology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] J. Clin. Oncol.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] United States
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69. Gallego R, Fuster D, Ginés A, Ortín J, Ayuso JR, Momblan D, Arguis P, Conill C, Pons F, Maurel J: Usefulness of PET/CT in the diagnosis of distant metastases of potentially operable gastric adenocarcinoma. J Clin Oncol; 2009 May 20;27(15_suppl):e15598
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  • [Title] Usefulness of PET/CT in the diagnosis of distant metastases of potentially operable gastric adenocarcinoma.
  • 1) To evaluate the usefulness of Positron Emission Tomography with combined 18F-Fluorodeoxyglucose with Computed Tomography (PET/CT) in the diagnosis of distant metastases in patients with gastric adenocarcinoma (GAC) compared to spiral double contrast thoracoabdominal Computed Tomography (CT);.
  • RESULTS: Distant metastases were found in 9/30 cases: carcinomatosis (3), retroperitoneal (3) or mediastinal (2) pathological lymph nodes and one case of bone metastases (1).
  • PET/CT diagnosed unsuspected distant metastases by CT in 4/9 patients (retroperitoneal (1) or mediastinal (2) pathological lymph nodes and 1 case of bone metastasis in the spine).
  • In 1/3 patients with histopathological confirmed diagnosis of peritoneal carcinomatosis by laparoscopic findings was negative by PET/CT, and considered as a false negative case.
  • 1) PET/CT is useful in the diagnosis of distant metastases in patients with GAC 2) Further studies are needed to establish the role of PET/CT to detect peritoneal carcinomatosis.

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  • (PMID = 27962880.001).
  • [ISSN] 1527-7755
  • [Journal-full-title] Journal of clinical oncology : official journal of the American Society of Clinical Oncology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] J. Clin. Oncol.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] United States
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70. McHugh C, Madigan K, Walsh A, Fox J, Leonard TW, Quint JB: MER-101-03, a multicenter, phase II study to compare MER-101 20mg tablets to intravenous zoledronic acid 4mg in prostate cancer patients. J Clin Oncol; 2009 May 20;27(15_suppl):5161
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  • [Title] MER-101-03, a multicenter, phase II study to compare MER-101 20mg tablets to intravenous zoledronic acid 4mg in prostate cancer patients.
  • : 5161 Background: The primary objective of this study is to examine the pharmacodynamic effects of two different regimens of zoledronic acid, Orazol 20 mg tablets versus Zometa 4mg IV infusion once-monthly therapy on biomarkers in male bisphosphonate-naïve hormone-refractory prostate cancer patients.
  • METHODS: The study is an open-label, multi-center phase II clinical trial to compare oral Orazol 20 mg tablets weekly, to infusions of intravenous Zometa 4mg monthly, in males with hormone-refractory prostate cancer, bone metastases, and no prior bisphosphonate treatment.
  • The study population consisted of men with hormone refractory prostate cancer as evidenced by history of rising PSA levels (last 2 of 3 PSA levels must be above nadir), who are bisphosphonate-naive, and have radiographically-confirmed bone metastases.
  • Efficacy assessments: The primary endpoints are the assessment of response of four biomarkers, urinary NTX, serum CTX, serum bone specific alkaline phosphatase, and serum calcium on days -7, 0, 7, 14, 21, 28, 35, 42, 49, and 56.
  • Secondary endpoints are assessments of performance and pain scores based on ECOG performance status, BPI, and analgesic use.
  • There were no statistically significant differences between any of the treatments in the primary and secondary endpoints.

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  • (PMID = 27964481.001).
  • [ISSN] 1527-7755
  • [Journal-full-title] Journal of clinical oncology : official journal of the American Society of Clinical Oncology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] J. Clin. Oncol.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] United States
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71. Keller A, Heim K, Welzel G, Findeisen P, Neumaier M, Wenz F: The influence of bisphosphonates on bone turnover markers in patients (pts) with breast cancer (BC). J Clin Oncol; 2009 May 20;27(15_suppl):1058
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  • [Title] The influence of bisphosphonates on bone turnover markers in patients (pts) with breast cancer (BC).
  • : 1058 Background: The relevance of the bone metabolism for the prognosis of BC pts is becoming widely accepted.
  • The bone resorption marker peptide-bound collagen type I cross-links C-telopeptides (ICTP) and the bone formation marker N-terminal propeptide of type I collagen (PINP) may become important tools to monitor the bone metabolism and may be influenced by co-medication.
  • We included BC pts without (n=118, 58±11 yrs) and with bone metastases (BM, n=23, 64 + 12 yrs).
  • For comparison 111 prostate cancer (PC) pts without (n = 84, 70 ± 6 yrs) and with BM (n = 27, 67 ± 10 yrs) were investigated.
  • The presence of BM (< 3 vs 1-3 mets) increased ICTP and PINP values further, whereas bisphosphonates lead to a significant reduction in PINP to normal values in these pts (58.3 vs 32.8 ug/l, p = 0.01).
  • CONCLUSIONS: Markers of bone metabolism may be useful for the diagnosis and follow-up of pts with BC and PC with and without BM.
  • Bone metastases and aromatase inhibitors increased serum ICTP and PINP, whereas bisphosphonates induced a significant decrease in serum PINP.

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  • (PMID = 27961128.001).
  • [ISSN] 1527-7755
  • [Journal-full-title] Journal of clinical oncology : official journal of the American Society of Clinical Oncology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] J. Clin. Oncol.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] United States
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72. Piperno-Neumann S, Homicsko K, Mussot S, Anract P, Laurence V, Pierga J, Mignot L, Chapelier A: A retrospective study of parameters influencing survival after surgical resection of lung metastases of bone and soft tissue sarcomas. J Clin Oncol; 2009 May 20;27(15_suppl):10541
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  • [Title] A retrospective study of parameters influencing survival after surgical resection of lung metastases of bone and soft tissue sarcomas.
  • : 10541 Background: Due to the high rate of isolated lung metastases of sarcomas, a multidisciplinary approach combining chemotherapy with pulmonary metastasectomy (PM) is helpful to achieve R0 resection and try to increase progression free survival (PFS) and overall survival (OS).
  • The aim of this retrospective study is to describe the clinical and tumor features of 70 consecutive operated patients and to identify the factors influencing survival.
  • RESULTS: 64 patients had grade II/III sarcomas of mainly lower limb origin.15 patients had synchronous lung metastases, 35 showed bilateral lesions (mean number of 4, mean size of 12 mm).
  • 51% were primary bone sarcomas (24 osteo, 9 Ewing, 3 chondro) and 49 % were soft tissue sarcomas (including 12 synovial, 9 leio).
  • The primary tumor treatment consisted in conservative surgery in 58 patients (83%).
  • 49 patients received neo and/or adjuvant chemotherapy, 22 patients had postoperative radiotherapy.
  • The resection margins were classified R0/R1/R2 in 54/16/0 patients, R0 was confirmed in 44 by CT scan in a month after PM.
  • With a median FU from diagnosis of 7.7 years, the median OS for all patients reached 59 months, and the median survival after metastasectomy (OSPM) 31 months.
  • 25 patients underwent subsequent PM for recurrent lung metastases, 30 are still alive.
  • On univariate analysis, primary high grade, DFI>24 months, number of metastases>3 and largest diameter>25 mm were significant negative factors for OS.
  • Multivariate analysis confirmed the importance of high grade, DFI, and size of metastases for OS.
  • DFI may be a surrogate marker for tumor biology.

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  • (PMID = 27963959.001).
  • [ISSN] 1527-7755
  • [Journal-full-title] Journal of clinical oncology : official journal of the American Society of Clinical Oncology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] J. Clin. Oncol.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] United States
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73. Basch EM, Sit L, Fruscione M, Burke L, Kane R, George D, Carducci MA, Matthew P, Beer TM, Scher HI: Pain and analgesic use in men with metastatic prostate cancer. J Clin Oncol; 2009 May 20;27(15_suppl):e20515
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  • [Title] Pain and analgesic use in men with metastatic prostate cancer.
  • : e20515 Background: Pain is an important endpoint in metastatic prostate cancer and was the basis for the 1996 FDA approval of mitoxantrone.
  • Standards for pain assessment have evolved, and a 2006 draft FDA guidance provides new recommendations for patient- reported outcomes.
  • The prevalence and distribution of pain severity at specific points in the prostate cancer disease continuum are not well defined.
  • METHODS: A questionnaire that includes the Brief Pain Inventory and additional pain/analgesia items was developed as a collaboration between the DOD/PCF-supported Prostate Cancer Clinical Trials Consortium (PCCTC) and FDA Study Endpoints and Labeling Design (SEALD) team.
  • RESULTS: Between August-December 2008, 325 men with prostate cancers representing different disease states being seen in outpatient clinics of participating centers were each queried once.
  • More than half (n=175) self-reported metastatic disease, including 129 with bone metastases.
  • Among those with bone metastases, 76 (59%) reported experiencing any level of pain in the last week; 49 (38%) reported a worst pain score ≥4/10 of which 38 (78%) used analgesics over the past week and 31 (63%) used daily analgesia.
  • Among the 49 patients with pain scores ≥4/10, current or past docetaxel use was reported by 32 (65%), androgen deprivation therapy by 47 (96%), and 28 (57%) had been or were currently enrolled in a clinical trial.
  • CONCLUSIONS: Pain is sufficiently prevalent in men with metastatic prostate cancer to enable prospective assessment of palliation endpoints in clinical trials.

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  • (PMID = 27960916.001).
  • [ISSN] 1527-7755
  • [Journal-full-title] Journal of clinical oncology : official journal of the American Society of Clinical Oncology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] J. Clin. Oncol.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] United States
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74. Doval DC, Bhatia K, Vaid AK, Pavithran K, Sharma JB, Hazarika D, Jena A: Spinal cord compression secondary to bone metastases from hepatocellular carcinoma. World J Gastroenterol; 2006 Aug 28;12(32):5247-52
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  • [Title] Spinal cord compression secondary to bone metastases from hepatocellular carcinoma.
  • Bone metastases are rare in primary hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC).
  • Spinal cord compression (SCC) due to bone metastases occur commonly in patients with lung and breast carcinomas, and metastatic HCC is an unusual cause of SCC.
  • Thus, the awareness that SCC could be a potential complication of bone metastases due to HCC is of significance in initiation of early treatment that can improve the quality of life and survival of the patients, if diagnosed earlier.
  • This paper describes four cases of primary HCC with varied manifestations of SCC due to bone metastases.
  • The first patient presented primarily with the symptoms of bone pains corresponding to the bone metastases sites rather than symptoms of associated hepatic pathology and eventually developed SCC.
  • The third patient developed SCC soon after the primary diagnosis and had to undergo emergency laminectomy.
  • [MeSH-major] Bone Neoplasms / pathology. Bone Neoplasms / secondary. Carcinoma, Hepatocellular / pathology. Liver Neoplasms / pathology. Spinal Cord Compression / etiology
  • [MeSH-minor] Aged. Humans. Male. Middle Aged. Neoplasm Metastasis

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  • (PMID = 16937544.001).
  • [ISSN] 1007-9327
  • [Journal-full-title] World journal of gastroenterology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] World J. Gastroenterol.
  • [Language] eng
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75. Kijima T, Fujii Y, Suyama T, Okubo Y, Yamamoto S, Masuda H, Yonese J, Fukui I: Radiotherapy to bone metastases from renal cell carcinoma with or without zoledronate. BJU Int; 2009 Mar;103(5):620-4
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  • [Title] Radiotherapy to bone metastases from renal cell carcinoma with or without zoledronate.
  • OBJECTIVE: To investigate the rate of objective response and the skeletal-related event (SRE)-free survival after combined therapy with radiotherapy (RT) and zoledronate in patients with bone metastases from renal cell carcinoma (RCC).
  • PATIENTS AND METHODS: In all, 23 patients with RCC metastatic to bone were included in this retrospective study, of whom 13 had RT to bone metastases with no bisphosphonate therapy between 2000 and 2006, while the remaining 10 had combined therapy with RT and zoledronate (RT + Z) in 2006 and 2007.
  • Significant calcifications of osteolytic metastases and/or shrinkage of bone lesions, as measured by computed tomography, were defined as a partial response.
  • SREs were defined as any of pathological fracture, spinal cord compression, bone surgery, or additional RT to the bone.
  • RESULTS: In the RT + Z group, six patients had a partial response, showing evidence of calcification of their osteolytic bone metastases, while in the RT group, only one patient did (P = 0.019).
  • CONCLUSION: Combined therapy as RT + Z achieved a higher objective response rate (six of 10) and prolonged SRE-free survival than RT alone in patients with bone metastases from RCC.
  • [MeSH-major] Bone Density Conservation Agents / therapeutic use. Bone Neoplasms. Carcinoma, Renal Cell. Diphosphonates / therapeutic use. Imidazoles / therapeutic use. Kidney Neoplasms

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  • [CommentIn] BJU Int. 2009 Aug;104(3):417-8; author reply 418 [19614659.001]
  • (PMID = 18990143.001).
  • [ISSN] 1464-410X
  • [Journal-full-title] BJU international
  • [ISO-abbreviation] BJU Int.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] England
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Bone Density Conservation Agents; 0 / Diphosphonates; 0 / Imidazoles; 6XC1PAD3KF / zoledronic acid
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76. Fujimaki Y, Tsuchiya H, Kawahara N, Tanzawa Y, Tomita K: [Surgical treatment for metastatic bone tumor]. Clin Calcium; 2006 Apr;16(4):647- 54
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  • [Title] [Surgical treatment for metastatic bone tumor].
  • Conventionally, palliative surgery has been commonly performed as pain management for bone metastasis which is regarded as terminal.
  • Recently, medical treatment in this area has made great advances and so life expectancy of patients with cancer has been prolonged.
  • [MeSH-major] Bone Neoplasms / secondary. Bone Neoplasms / surgery. Pain / surgery. Palliative Care
  • [MeSH-minor] Activities of Daily Living. Decompression, Surgical. Humans. Orthopedic Procedures. Spinal Neoplasms / complications. Spinal Neoplasms / secondary. Spinal Neoplasms / surgery

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  • (PMID = 16582517.001).
  • [ISSN] 0917-5857
  • [Journal-full-title] Clinical calcium
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Clin Calcium
  • [Language] jpn
  • [Publication-type] English Abstract; Journal Article; Review
  • [Publication-country] Japan
  • [Number-of-references] 7
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77. Cody JJ, Rivera AA, Lyons GR, Yang SW, Wang M, Sarver DB, Wang D, Selander KS, Kuo HC, Meleth S, Feng X, Siegal GP, Douglas JT: Arming a replicating adenovirus with osteoprotegerin reduces the tumor burden in a murine model of osteolytic bone metastases of breast cancer. Cancer Gene Ther; 2010 Dec;17(12):893-905
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  • [Title] Arming a replicating adenovirus with osteoprotegerin reduces the tumor burden in a murine model of osteolytic bone metastases of breast cancer.
  • Most patients with advanced breast cancer develop osteolytic bone metastases, which have numerous complications.
  • Conditionally replicating adenoviruses (CRAds) are anticancer agents designed to infect and lyse tumor cells.
  • However, in spite of their promise as selective cancer therapeutics, replicating adenoviruses have shown limited efficacy in the clinical setting.
  • We hypothesized that a CRAd armed with osteoprotegerin (OPG) would eradicate bone metastases of breast cancer both directly, by oncolysis, and indirectly, by inhibiting osteoclastic bone resorption, and thus reducing the tumor burden.
  • Conditional replication was conferred by a 24-base pair deletion within E1A (Δ24), which prevents the binding of E1A to the retinoblastoma tumor suppressor/cell cycle regulator protein and limits replication in normal cells.
  • After characterization of the armed CRAd, we demonstrated that infection of breast cancer cells by Ad5-Δ24-sOPG-Fc-RGD both killed the infected cells by oncolysis and inhibited the formation of osteoclasts in an in vitro co-culture model.
  • In a murine model of osteolytic bone metastases of breast cancer, the CRAd armed with shortened OPG (sOPG)-Fc reduced tumor burden in the bone and inhibited osteoclast formation more effectively than an unarmed CRAd.
  • [MeSH-major] Adenoviridae / genetics. Bone Neoplasms / secondary. Breast Neoplasms / therapy. Osteoprotegerin / genetics
  • [MeSH-minor] Animals. Carrier Proteins / genetics. Carrier Proteins / metabolism. Cell Line, Tumor. Female. Humans. Mice. Tumor Burden / genetics. Virus Replication

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  • (PMID = 20798695.001).
  • [ISSN] 1476-5500
  • [Journal-full-title] Cancer gene therapy
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Cancer Gene Ther.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Grant] United States / NIAMS NIH HHS / AR / P30 AR046031; United States / NIAMS NIH HHS / AR / P30 AR046031; United States / NCI NIH HHS / CA / P50 CA089019; United States / NCI NIH HHS / CA / P50 CA089019; United States / NCI NIH HHS / CA / R01 CA108585; United States / NCI NIH HHS / CA / R01 CA108585; United States / NCI NIH HHS / CA / T32 CA075930; United States / NCI NIH HHS / CA / T32 CA075930
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't; Research Support, U.S. Gov't, Non-P.H.S.
  • [Publication-country] England
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Carrier Proteins; 0 / Osteoprotegerin; 0 / prolactin-binding protein
  • [Other-IDs] NLM/ NIHMS202701; NLM/ PMC3842170
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78. Niu G, Liao Z, Cai L, Wei R, Sun L: The combined effects of celecoxib and minocycline hydrochloride on inhibiting the osseous metastasis of breast cancer in nude mice. Cancer Biother Radiopharm; 2008 Aug;23(4):469-76
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  • [Title] The combined effects of celecoxib and minocycline hydrochloride on inhibiting the osseous metastasis of breast cancer in nude mice.
  • Breast carcinomas show a trend toward bone metastasis that is prevalent worldwide.
  • Celecoxib (CX) and minocycline hydrochloride (MH) have both been widely used in treating breast cancer; however, their combined effects on the osseous metastasis of breast cancer have not yet been studied.
  • In the present study, breast cancer cells were injected into the back of the femoral bone of nude mice, and CX and MH were intraperitoneally administered every other day at doses of 30 and 40 mg/kg/day, respectively, for 30 days.
  • Tumor weights and volumes were significantly lower and the tumor inhibition rate was significantly higher in the CX + MH group than those of the control and CX or MH alone groups (p < 0.05).
  • The cell density in the tumor tissue was significantly decreased and apoptotic and necrotic cell death was significantly increased in the CX + MH group, as compared with those of the control and CX or MH alone groups.
  • Microvessel density and expression of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) and matrix metalloproteinase (MMP)-9 in the tumor tissues of the CX + MH group were significantly lower than those of the CX, MH, and control groups.
  • These results suggest that a combined use of CX and MH has better inhibitory effects on the osseous metastasis of breast cancer, as compared to CX or MH alone.
  • They exerted their combined effects by increasing tumor-cell death and decreasing the tumor expression of MMP-9 and VEGF systems.
  • [MeSH-major] Bone Neoplasms / drug therapy. Breast Neoplasms / pathology. Minocycline / therapeutic use. Pyrazoles / therapeutic use. Sulfonamides / therapeutic use
  • [MeSH-minor] Alkaline Phosphatase / blood. Animals. Apoptosis / drug effects. Body Weight / drug effects. Celecoxib. Cell Line, Tumor. Cyclooxygenase Inhibitors / therapeutic use. Drug Therapy, Combination. Female. Humans. Matrix Metalloproteinase 9 / metabolism. Mice. Mice, Inbred Strains. Mice, Nude. Tumor Burden / drug effects. Vascular Endothelial Growth Factor A / metabolism. Xenograft Model Antitumor Assays / methods

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  • (PMID = 18771351.001).
  • [ISSN] 1557-8852
  • [Journal-full-title] Cancer biotherapy & radiopharmaceuticals
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Cancer Biother. Radiopharm.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
  • [Publication-country] United States
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Cyclooxygenase Inhibitors; 0 / Pyrazoles; 0 / Sulfonamides; 0 / Vascular Endothelial Growth Factor A; EC 3.1.3.1 / Alkaline Phosphatase; EC 3.4.24.35 / Matrix Metalloproteinase 9; FYY3R43WGO / Minocycline; JCX84Q7J1L / Celecoxib
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79. Meyer A, Behrend M: Partial resection of the sternum for osseous metastasis of differentiated thyroid cancer: case report. Anticancer Res; 2005 Nov-Dec;25(6C):4389-92
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  • [Title] Partial resection of the sternum for osseous metastasis of differentiated thyroid cancer: case report.
  • BACKGROUND: Due to their resistance to radio-iodine therapy, skeletal metastases from differentiated thyroid cancer (DTC) are difficult to treat.
  • Surgical resection of solitary skeletal metastasis may offer cure with prolonged survival.
  • CASE REPORT: A patient with the simultaneous appearance of local recurrence of DTC and skeletal metastasis of the cranial sternum is reported.
  • After radical excision of the tumour recurrence and the lymph nodes, a partial sternal resection was carried out, and the defect in the chest wall was reconstructed with polypropylene mesh.
  • At the follow-up, 4 1/2 years after the resection of the sternal metastasis, the patient is free of disease.
  • CONCLUSION: Sternal resection for solitary osseous metastasis of DTC should be performed on selected, individual patients.
  • [MeSH-major] Bone Neoplasms / secondary. Bone Neoplasms / surgery. Sternum / surgery. Thyroid Neoplasms / pathology. Thyroid Neoplasms / surgery

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  • (PMID = 16334113.001).
  • [ISSN] 0250-7005
  • [Journal-full-title] Anticancer research
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Anticancer Res.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Case Reports; Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] Greece
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80. Takita M, Inada M, Maruyama T, Miyaura C: Prostaglandin E receptor EP4 antagonist suppresses osteolysis due to bone metastasis of mouse malignant melanoma cells. FEBS Lett; 2007 Feb 6;581(3):565-71
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  • [Title] Prostaglandin E receptor EP4 antagonist suppresses osteolysis due to bone metastasis of mouse malignant melanoma cells.
  • We examined the effects of prostaglandin E (PGE) receptor subtype EP4 antagonist on bone metastasis of cancer to clarify PGE's role in bone metastasis.
  • Metastatic regions were detected in femurs accompanying severe bone loss in mice injected with B16 malignant melanoma cells.
  • Administration of EP4 antagonist restored the bone loss induced by B16 melanoma.
  • Adding B16 cells induced osteoclast formation in the coculture of bone marrow cells and osteoblasts without any exogenous bone-resorbing factor, and EP4 antagonist completely suppressed the osteoclast formation induced by B16 cells.
  • Therefore, EP4 antagonist is a possible candidate for the therapy of bone metastasis of cancer.
  • [MeSH-major] Bone Neoplasms / secondary. Melanoma, Experimental / secondary. Osteolysis / prevention & control. Receptors, Prostaglandin E / antagonists & inhibitors
  • [MeSH-minor] Animals. Bone Density / drug effects. Cell Division / drug effects. Dinoprostone / biosynthesis. Male. Mice. Mice, Inbred C57BL. Naphthalenes / pharmacology. Osteoclasts / pathology. Phenylbutyrates / pharmacology. Receptors, Prostaglandin E, EP4 Subtype

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  • (PMID = 17254571.001).
  • [ISSN] 0014-5793
  • [Journal-full-title] FEBS letters
  • [ISO-abbreviation] FEBS Lett.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] Netherlands
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / 4-(4-cyano-2-(2-(4-fluoronaphthalen-1-yl)propionylamino)phenyl)butyric acid; 0 / Naphthalenes; 0 / Phenylbutyrates; 0 / Ptger4 protein, mouse; 0 / Receptors, Prostaglandin E; 0 / Receptors, Prostaglandin E, EP4 Subtype; K7Q1JQR04M / Dinoprostone
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81. Pontes J Jr, Srougi M, Borra PM, Dall' Oglio MF, Ribeiro-Filho LA, Leite KR: E-cadherin and beta-catenin loss of expression related to bone metastasis in prostate cancer. Appl Immunohistochem Mol Morphol; 2010 Mar;18(2):179-84
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  • [Title] E-cadherin and beta-catenin loss of expression related to bone metastasis in prostate cancer.
  • A disturbance in epithelial cell adhesion, which leads to a more invasive and metastatic phenotype, is a hallmark of tumor progression.
  • Several immunohistochemical studies have reported a strong correlation between loss of their expression to higher stage and grade in prostate carcinoma, but their influence in metastatic process is not yet known.
  • The aim of this study is to verify the role of adhesion molecules in the progression of prostate cancer (PC), assessing the expression of E-cadherin and beta-catenin in bone metastasis.
  • MATERIALS AND METHODS: Twenty-eight bone metastases of prostate carcinoma were submitted to immunohistochemistry analysis for E-cadherin and beta-catenin expression.
  • In 6 patients, we were able to assess the expression of the adhesion molecules in the primary tumors and their respective metastases.
  • The definition of normal expression for both antibodies was strong and diffuse expression in more than 70% of tumor cells.
  • RESULTS: In bone metastases, there was loss of expression of E-cadherin and beta-catenin in 86% and 82%, respectively.
  • Among the primary tumors, E-cadherin and beta-catenin expression was normal in 83% and 50% cases, respectively.
  • Considering the 6 patients with paired primary and bone metastasis, we found loss of expression for both E-cadherin and beta-catenin in most of the cases.
  • CONCLUSIONS: Comparing primary PC and its metastasis, we showed persistent loss of E-cadherin and beta-catenin expression.
  • This phenomenon may be related to metastatic potential in PC, because we have shown underexpression for E-cadherin and beta-catenin in 86% and 82% of bone metastases.

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  • (PMID = 18685493.001).
  • [ISSN] 1533-4058
  • [Journal-full-title] Applied immunohistochemistry & molecular morphology : AIMM
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Appl. Immunohistochem. Mol. Morphol.
  • [Language] ENG
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] United States
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Cadherins; 0 / beta Catenin
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82. Tumminello FM, Badalamenti G, Fulfaro F, Incorvaia L, Crescimanno M, Flandina C, Sepporta MV, Leto G: Serum follistatin in patients with prostate cancer metastatic to the bone. Clin Exp Metastasis; 2010 Dec;27(8):549-55
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  • [Title] Serum follistatin in patients with prostate cancer metastatic to the bone.
  • The clinical significance of circulating follistatin (FLST), an inhibitor of the multifunctional cytokine activin A (Act A), was investigated in patients with prostate cancer (PCa).
  • The serum concentrations of this molecule were determined by an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) in PCa patients with (M+) or without (M0) bone metastases, in patients with benign prostate hyperplasia (BPH) and in healthy subjects (HS).
  • The effectiveness of FLST in detecting PCa patients with skeletal metastases was determined by the receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curve analysis.
  • In cancer patients the serum concentrations of FLST significantly correlated with the presence of bone metastases (P = 0.0005) or increased PSA levels (P = 0.04).
  • These findings suggest that FLST may be regarded as a potential, molecular target in the treatment of metastatic bone disease while its clinical role as soluble marker in the clinical management of PCa patients with bone metastases needs to be better defined.
  • [MeSH-major] Bone Neoplasms / blood. Bone Neoplasms / secondary. Follistatin / blood. Prostatic Neoplasms / blood


83. Singh B, Berry JA, Shoher A, Ayers GD, Wei C, Lucci A: COX-2 involvement in breast cancer metastasis to bone. Oncogene; 2007 May 31;26(26):3789-96
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  • [Title] COX-2 involvement in breast cancer metastasis to bone.
  • Cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) is expressed in 40% of human invasive breast cancers.
  • Bone is the predominant site of metastasis in case of breast cancer.
  • We investigated the role of COX-2 in a suitable mouse model of breast cancer metastasis to bone using the whole-body luciferase imaging of cancer cells.
  • We provide several lines of evidence that COX-2 produced in breast cancer cells is important for bone metastasis in this model including (1) COX-2 transfection enhanced the bone metastasis of MDA-435S cells and (2) breast cancer cells isolated and cultured from the bone metastases produced significantly more prostaglandin E(2) (an important mediator of COX-2) than the parental injected cell populations of breast cancer cells.
  • Next, we found that a COX-2 inhibitor, MF-tricyclic, inhibited bone metastasis caused by a bone-seeking clone both in prevention regimen (in which case mice started receiving MF-tricyclic 1 week before the injection of cancer cells) and in treatment regimen (in which case mice received MF-tricyclic after the development of bone metastasis).
  • These studies indicate that COX-2 produced in breast cancer cells may be vital to the development of osteolytic bone metastases in patients with breast cancer, and that COX-2 inhibitors may be useful in halting this process.
  • [MeSH-major] Bone Neoplasms / secondary. Cyclooxygenase 2 / metabolism. Mammary Neoplasms, Experimental / enzymology. Mammary Neoplasms, Experimental / pathology. Neoplasm Metastasis / prevention & control
  • [MeSH-minor] Animals. Blotting, Western. Cell Line, Tumor. Cyclooxygenase 2 Inhibitors / pharmacology. Dinoprostone / biosynthesis. Female. Humans. Mice. Transfection

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  • (PMID = 17213821.001).
  • [ISSN] 0950-9232
  • [Journal-full-title] Oncogene
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Oncogene
  • [Language] eng
  • [Grant] United States / NIDDK NIH HHS / DK / R21 DK067682
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't; Research Support, U.S. Gov't, Non-P.H.S.
  • [Publication-country] England
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Cyclooxygenase 2 Inhibitors; EC 1.14.99.- / Ptgs2 protein, mouse; EC 1.14.99.1 / Cyclooxygenase 2; K7Q1JQR04M / Dinoprostone
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84. Morita R, Jin M, Ogawa B, Kuwata K, Shibutani M, Mitsumori K: A mixed apocrine gland tumor with metastases to the bone and bone marrow in a miniature poodle. J Toxicol Pathol; 2010 Jun;23(2):95-8
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  • [Title] A mixed apocrine gland tumor with metastases to the bone and bone marrow in a miniature poodle.
  • The tumor was divided into small multiple lobules by delicate connective tissues, and necroses were found in some of the central lobules.
  • The tumor cells were similar to the structure of apocrine gland epithelial cells with apical blebs resembling apocrine secretion and eosinophilic secretary materials within the luminal space, and spindle cells were sometimes found in the basal area of the glandular structure.
  • In some areas, tumor cells invaded in the blood vessels, bone and bone marrow.
  • Immunohistochemically, the tumor cells forming tubulo-acinar to solid structures were intensely positive for cytokeratin and keratin K8/K18, and the spindle cells were positive for vimentin and alpha-smooth muscle actin.
  • This case was diagnosed as a malignant mixed apocrine gland tumor with metastases to the bone and bone marrow.

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  • (PMID = 22272018.001).
  • [ISSN] 1881-915X
  • [Journal-full-title] Journal of toxicologic pathology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] J Toxicol Pathol
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] Japan
  • [Other-IDs] NLM/ PMC3234640
  • [Keywords] NOTNLM ; apocrine gland tumor / dog / mixed tumor
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85. Kehoe SM, Zivanovic O, Ferguson SE, Barakat RR, Soslow RA: Clinicopathologic features of bone metastases and outcomes in patients with primary endometrial cancer. Gynecol Oncol; 2010 May;117(2):229-33
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  • [Title] Clinicopathologic features of bone metastases and outcomes in patients with primary endometrial cancer.
  • OBJECTIVE: Patients with advanced or recurrent endometrial cancer often have distant metastases found within the lymph nodes, liver, and/or lung.
  • However, there have been reported cases of primary endometrial cancer with metastasis to the bone.
  • The objective of this study was to describe the clinical and pathologic features of endometrial cancer metastatic to bone.
  • METHODS: A retrospective chart review of our clinical and pathology database was performed to identify women diagnosed with endometrial cancer metastatic to the bone between 1990 and 2007.
  • Slides were re-reviewed to confirm the diagnosis.
  • RESULTS: Twenty-one patients with endometrial cancer metastatic to the bone were identified; in 12 patients (57%), the diagnosis was confirmed by a bone biopsy.
  • The median age of diagnosis of primary endometrial cancer was 60 years (range, 32-84).
  • Six patients (29%) had a bone metastasis at the time of diagnosis while 15 patients (71%) had a bone lesion as a recurrence.
  • The median time to a diagnosis of bone metastasis recurrence was 10 months (range, 3-148).
  • The overall survival of those patients with bone metastases at primary diagnosis was 17 months (95% CI: 2-32) compared to 32 months (95% CI: 14-49) for those with a recurrent bone metastasis.
  • CONCLUSION: Although a rare event, endometrial cancer can metastasize to the bone.
  • If a bone lesion is identified, treatment using a multimodality approach is reasonable, especially if found as an isolated recurrence.
  • [MeSH-major] Bone Neoplasms / secondary. Endometrial Neoplasms / pathology
  • [MeSH-minor] Adult. Aged. Aged, 80 and over. Female. Humans. Middle Aged. Neoplasm Staging. Retrospective Studies. Survival Rate

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  • [Copyright] Copyright (c) 2010 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.
  • (PMID = 20199802.001).
  • [ISSN] 1095-6859
  • [Journal-full-title] Gynecologic oncology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Gynecol. Oncol.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] United States
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86. Incorvaia L, Badalamenti G, Rini G, Arcara C, Fricano S, Sferrazza C, Di Trapani D, Gebbia N, Leto G: MMP-2, MMP-9 and activin A blood levels in patients with breast cancer or prostate cancer metastatic to the bone. Anticancer Res; 2007 May-Jun;27(3B):1519-25
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  • [Title] MMP-2, MMP-9 and activin A blood levels in patients with breast cancer or prostate cancer metastatic to the bone.
  • BACKGROUND: The clinical significance of the circulating levels of activin A and matrix metalloproteinase-2 (MMP-2) and -9 (MMP-9) was investigated in patients with breast cancer (BC) or prostate cancer (PC) with (M1) or without (M0) bone metastasis.
  • PATIENTS AND METHODS: MMP-2, MMP-9 and activin A blood concentrations were measured by enzyme immunoassays in 79 cancer patients and in 57 healthy blood donors (HS) who served as a control group.
  • The diagnostic accuracy of these molecules to discriminate between M0 and M1 patients was evaluated by the receiver operating characteristic curve (ROC) and compared to that of tumor markers CA15.3 or prostate-specific antigen (PSA).
  • RESULTS: Activin A and MMP-2 were significantly increased in BC and PC patients as compared to sex-matched HS while MMP-9 levels were more elevated only in the PC patients.
  • In this latter group, activin A and CA15.3 but not MMP-2 or MMP-9 were increased in the M1 patients as compared to M0 patients.
  • Furthermore, a significant relationship was also highlighted between activin A concentration and the number of bone metastases and tumor grade, between MMP-9 and tumor grade, and between MMP-2 and CA15.3.
  • ROC curve analysis showed a good diagnostic accuracy for activin A and CA15.3 but a poor accuracy for MMP-2 and MMP-9 in discriminating between M0 and M1 patients.
  • In the PC group, only activin A and PSA levels were significantly increased in the M1 patients as compared to the M0 patients.
  • Interestingly, a significant correlation was observed between PSA and activin A and MMP-9, and between Activin A and Gleason score and the number of skeletal metastases.
  • ROC curve analysis showed a good diagnostic accuracy for activin A, MMP-9 and PSA and a poor diagnostic accuracy for MMP-2 in detecting M1 patients.
  • CONCLUSION: Activin A, MMP-2 and MMP-9 may be regarded as possible therapeutic targets in the treatment of metastatic bone disease.
  • However, their usefulness as additional markers of bone metastasis remains to be better defined.
  • [MeSH-major] Activins / blood. Bone Neoplasms / diagnosis. Breast Neoplasms / diagnosis. Matrix Metalloproteinase 2 / blood. Matrix Metalloproteinase 9 / blood. Prostatic Neoplasms / diagnosis


87. Davies S, Jiang WG: ALCAM, activated leukocyte cell adhesion molecule, influences the aggressive nature of breast cancer cells, a potential connection to bone metastasis. Anticancer Res; 2010 Apr;30(4):1163-8
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  • [Title] ALCAM, activated leukocyte cell adhesion molecule, influences the aggressive nature of breast cancer cells, a potential connection to bone metastasis.
  • INTRODUCTION: ALCAM, activated leukocyte cell adhesion molecule, is connected to the progression of certain solid tumours and has been shown to be a prominent feature for tumours that subsequently developed bone metastasis.
  • The present study investigated the biological influence of ALCAM on breast cancer cells in connection with bone biological environment.
  • MATERIALS AND METHODS: Suitable breast cancer cells were transfected with either the ALCAM expression construct or anti-ALCAM transgene, to create sublines that had differential expression of ALCAM.
  • However, in the presence of bone matrix proteins, MDA MB-231(ALCAMexp) showed a significantly reduced rate of growth, p<0.01 vs. control cells.
  • Inclusion of bone matrix proteins therefore further reduced the migration speed of MDA MB-231(ALCAMexp) cells.
  • CONCLUSION: Loss of ALCAM in breast cancer cells facilitates the invasive behaviour of breast cancer and high levels of ALCAM in the cells have a suppressive role in the aggressive nature of breast cancer cells.
  • [MeSH-major] Antigens, CD / biosynthesis. Bone Neoplasms / secondary. Breast Neoplasms / metabolism. Breast Neoplasms / pathology. Cell Adhesion Molecules, Neuronal / biosynthesis. Fetal Proteins / biosynthesis
  • [MeSH-minor] Cell Adhesion / physiology. Cell Growth Processes / physiology. Cell Line, Tumor. Cell Movement / physiology. Extracellular Matrix / genetics. Extracellular Matrix / metabolism. Extracellular Matrix / pathology. Female. Gene Expression Profiling. Humans. Neoplasm Invasiveness. RNA, Messenger / biosynthesis. RNA, Messenger / genetics. Transfection

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  • (PMID = 20530423.001).
  • [ISSN] 1791-7530
  • [Journal-full-title] Anticancer research
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Anticancer Res.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
  • [Publication-country] Greece
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / ALCAM protein, human; 0 / Antigens, CD; 0 / Cell Adhesion Molecules, Neuronal; 0 / Fetal Proteins; 0 / RNA, Messenger
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88. Salminen EK, Kallioinen MJ, Ala-Houhala MA, Vihinen PP, Tiitinen SL, Varpula M, Vahlberg TJ: Survival markers related to bone metastases in prostate cancer. Anticancer Res; 2006 Nov-Dec;26(6C):4879-84
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  • [Title] Survival markers related to bone metastases in prostate cancer.
  • Prognostic value of a bone resorption marker, tartrate-resistant acid phosphatase isoform 5b (TRACP 5b), and two matrix metalloproteinases (MMP-2 and MMP-9) was compared with the standard clinical analyses of total alkaline phosphatase (tALP) and prostate-specific antigen (PSA), in prostate cancer (PC) patients with (BM+) or without (BM-) bone metastases.
  • Of the three novel markers tested, only TRACP 5b proved to be predictive of survival in PC with bone metastases.
  • [MeSH-major] Biomarkers, Tumor / blood. Bone Neoplasms / blood. Bone Neoplasms / secondary. Prostatic Neoplasms / blood. Prostatic Neoplasms / pathology

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  • (PMID = 17214355.001).
  • [ISSN] 0250-7005
  • [Journal-full-title] Anticancer research
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Anticancer Res.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] Greece
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Biomarkers, Tumor; 0 / Isoenzymes; EC 3.1.3.- / tartrate-resistant acid phosphatase; EC 3.1.3.1 / Alkaline Phosphatase; EC 3.1.3.2 / Acid Phosphatase; EC 3.4.21.77 / Prostate-Specific Antigen; EC 3.4.24.24 / Matrix Metalloproteinase 2; EC 3.4.24.35 / Matrix Metalloproteinase 9
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89. Canacci AM, Nunez C, Getty P, Abdul-Karim F: Diagnosis of malignant granular cell tumor metastatic to bone by fine needle aspiration cytology: a case report. Acta Cytol; 2010 Mar-Apr;54(2):190-2
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  • [Title] Diagnosis of malignant granular cell tumor metastatic to bone by fine needle aspiration cytology: a case report.
  • BACKGROUND: Malignant granular cell tumor (GCT) is a rare sarcoma that is often difficult to differentiate histologically from its benign counterpart.
  • Radiographic studies revealed a lytic lesion within the left humeral metaphysis and a pathologic fracture.
  • The patient subse quently underwent curettage of the tumor with prophylactic fixation of the left proximal humerus.
  • CONCLUSION: The diagnosis of metastatic malignant GCT was rendered in this case.
  • The fne needle aspiration ofmetastatic GCT may lack cytologic features of malignancy.
  • The diagnosis necessitates clinical correlation and an understanding of the spectrum of histopathologic changes in GCT and malignant
  • [MeSH-major] Bone Neoplasms / diagnosis. Granular Cell Tumor / diagnosis. Humerus / pathology

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  • (PMID = 20391977.001).
  • [ISSN] 0001-5547
  • [Journal-full-title] Acta cytologica
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Acta Cytol.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Case Reports; Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] United States
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90. Doval DC, Bhatia K, Vaid AK, Prabhash K, Jena A, Hazarika D: Bone metastases from primary hepatocellular carcinoma simulating multiple myeloma. Hepatobiliary Pancreat Dis Int; 2005 May;4(2):308-10
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  • [Title] Bone metastases from primary hepatocellular carcinoma simulating multiple myeloma.
  • A 65-year-old man presented with bone pains and anemia.
  • Skull X-ray revealed multiple osteolytic lesions.
  • The patient was evaluated for multiple myeloma but detailed workup revealed the diagnosis of primary hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) with osteolytic bone metastases.
  • Thus, bone metastases due to HCC, although rare, should be considered in patients presenting with bone pains due to osteolytic lesions.
  • [MeSH-major] Bone Neoplasms / secondary. Carcinoma, Hepatocellular / secondary. Liver Neoplasms / pathology. Multiple Myeloma / diagnosis. Palliative Care / methods
  • [MeSH-minor] Aged. Antineoplastic Combined Chemotherapy Protocols / therapeutic use. Combined Modality Therapy. Diagnosis, Differential. Disease Progression. Fatal Outcome. Humans. Magnetic Resonance Imaging. Male. Neoplasm Staging. Radiotherapy, Adjuvant


91. Uharcek P, Mlyncek M, Ravinger J: Endometrial adenocarcinoma presenting with an osseous metastasis. Gynecol Obstet Invest; 2006;61(4):200-2
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  • [Title] Endometrial adenocarcinoma presenting with an osseous metastasis.
  • BACKGROUND: Gynecologic cancers metastatic to bone are rare.
  • Biopsy revealed primary endometrioid carcinoma metastatic to the calcaneus, talus and metatarsal bones.
  • Postoperatively the patient received cisplatin with adriamycin and megestrol acetate and is alive with no evidence of disease 20 months after the diagnosis.
  • CONCLUSION: Endometrial carcinoma can present as a metastatic lesion of bone.
  • [MeSH-major] Adenocarcinoma / secondary. Bone Neoplasms / secondary. Endometrial Neoplasms / pathology

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  • [Copyright] Copyright (c) 2006 S. Karger AG, Basel.
  • (PMID = 16479137.001).
  • [ISSN] 0378-7346
  • [Journal-full-title] Gynecologic and obstetric investigation
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Gynecol. Obstet. Invest.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Case Reports; Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] Switzerland
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 80168379AG / Doxorubicin; Q20Q21Q62J / Cisplatin; TJ2M0FR8ES / Megestrol Acetate
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92. Perut F, Cenni E, Unger RE, Kirkpatrick CJ, Giunti A, Baldini N: Immunogenic properties of renal cell carcinoma and the pathogenesis of osteolytic bone metastases. Int J Oncol; 2009 May;34(5):1387-93
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  • [Title] Immunogenic properties of renal cell carcinoma and the pathogenesis of osteolytic bone metastases.
  • The immunogenic properties of renal cell carcinoma (RCC) on bone osteolysis were investigated. mRNA expression of three proinflammatory cytokines, monocyte chemotactic protein-1 (MCP-1), interleukin-6 (IL-6) and interleukin-8 (IL-8), were determined in a panel of RCC lines (CRBM 1990, ACHN and Caki-1).
  • Moreover proinflammatory cytokine mRNA expression and protein levels of adhesion molecules, intercellular adhesion molecule-1 (ICAM-1) and E-selectin, on human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVEC) incubated with the conditioned media from RCC lines were evaluated.
  • RCC express mRNA of MCP-1, IL-6 and IL-8 that may induce a proinflammatory phenotype in endothelial cells. mRNA expression of IL-6, and IL-8 was induced on HUVEC treated with the conditioned media from RCC lines and mRNA and protein levels of ICAM-1 and E-selectin were also increased.
  • This study demonstrates the immunogenic properties of renal cell carcinoma, such as pro-inflammatory cytokine secretion and the induction of adhesion molecules (ICAM-1 and E-Sel) by endothelial cells.
  • ICAM-1 binds lymphocyte function-associated antigen-1 (LFA-1), which is expressed by pre-osteoclasts, so that, the observed proinflammatory phenotype in HUVEC may also favour osteoclast recruitment in bone metastases microenvironment.
  • Osteolysis in bone metastases, mediated by this pathway, may be further potentiated by the pro-angiogenic properties of RCC.
  • [MeSH-major] Bone Neoplasms / etiology. Carcinoma, Renal Cell / immunology. Inflammation Mediators / metabolism. Kidney Neoplasms / immunology. Osteolysis / etiology


93. Nakamura M, Saitoh M, Miyamoto S, Kubo Y, Tomita H, Andoh A: Case of a giant mucinous ovarian carcinoma with bone metastasis. J Obstet Gynaecol Res; 2005 Dec;31(6):576-8
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  • [Title] Case of a giant mucinous ovarian carcinoma with bone metastasis.
  • We report the case of a 51-year-old Japanese woman with a giant (50.75-kg) ovarian tumor.
  • The histopathologic diagnosis was mucinous cystadenocarcinoma.
  • After surgery, the patient was intubated and connected to a respirator for 8 days.
  • Thereafter, she was diagnosed with bone metastasis to the hip bone and the femur.
  • [MeSH-minor] Bone Neoplasms / pathology. Bone Neoplasms / secondary. Fatal Outcome. Female. Humans. Middle Aged

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  • (PMID = 16343263.001).
  • [ISSN] 1341-8076
  • [Journal-full-title] The journal of obstetrics and gynaecology research
  • [ISO-abbreviation] J. Obstet. Gynaecol. Res.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Case Reports; Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] Japan
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94. Constantine C, Miller DC, Gardner S, Balmaceda C, Finlay J: Osseous metastasis of pineoblastoma: a case report and review of the literature. J Neurooncol; 2005 Aug;74(1):53-7
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  • [Title] Osseous metastasis of pineoblastoma: a case report and review of the literature.
  • PURPOSE: To review the literature on the occurrence of osseous metastases in recurrent pineoblastoma, and to report upon the feasibility and efficacy of treatment using intensive conventional chemotherapy to achieve a remission, followed by consolidation with marrow ablative chemotherapy and autologous hemopoietic stem cell rescue.
  • PATIENT AND METHODS: An adult with isolated extraneural, osseous and bone marrow metastases from a pineoblastoma, received conventional cyclical chemotherapy, followed by consolidation with marrow ablative chemotherapy (thiotepa, carboplatin and temozolomide) and autologous hemopoietic stem cell rescue.
  • CONCLUSIONS: Osseous metastases from pineoblastoma are an extremely rare occurrence.
  • We conclude that conventional chemotherapy can achieve a complete response, and subsequent consolidation with marrow ablative chemotherapy and autologous hemopoietic stem cell rescue is feasible and well tolerated.
  • [MeSH-major] Bone Marrow Neoplasms / secondary. Bone Neoplasms / secondary. Brain Neoplasms / pathology. Pineal Gland / pathology. Pinealoma / pathology
  • [MeSH-minor] Adult. Antineoplastic Combined Chemotherapy Protocols. Combined Modality Therapy. Diagnosis, Differential. Female. Germinoma / pathology. Hematopoietic Stem Cell Transplantation. Humans. Magnetic Resonance Imaging. Treatment Outcome

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  • (PMID = 16078108.001).
  • [ISSN] 0167-594X
  • [Journal-full-title] Journal of neuro-oncology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] J. Neurooncol.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Case Reports; Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] Netherlands
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95. Kikuchi D, Iizuka T, Yahagi N, Maruno H, Okazaki A, Takeda Y, Yamamoto S, Kawabata H, Hayashi M, Kishi K: [Difference in treatment for metastatic bone tumors due to differences in opinion among departments--the role of medical teams for metastatic bone tumors]. Gan To Kagaku Ryoho; 2010 Mar;37(3):473-7
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  • [Title] [Difference in treatment for metastatic bone tumors due to differences in opinion among departments--the role of medical teams for metastatic bone tumors].
  • Few experts can deal appropriately with metastatic bone tumors in the present situation.
  • Development of new treatment for metastatic bone tumors is awaited, but there is a possibility of inappropriate use as with zoledronic acid because of lack of knowledge and experience.
  • So a medical team is necessary to provide the most recent knowledge of metastatic bone tumor and to enlighten other doctors.
  • [MeSH-major] Bone Neoplasms / drug therapy. Bone Neoplasms / secondary. Health Knowledge, Attitudes, Practice. Patient Care Team

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  • (PMID = 20332686.001).
  • [ISSN] 0385-0684
  • [Journal-full-title] Gan to kagaku ryoho. Cancer & chemotherapy
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Gan To Kagaku Ryoho
  • [Language] jpn
  • [Publication-type] English Abstract; Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] Japan
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Diphosphonates; 0 / Imidazoles; 6XC1PAD3KF / zoledronic acid
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96. Peleg S: Responsiveness of osteoblastic and osteolytic bone metastases to vitamin D analogs. Crit Rev Eukaryot Gene Expr; 2007;17(2):149-58
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  • [Title] Responsiveness of osteoblastic and osteolytic bone metastases to vitamin D analogs.
  • Bone is the primary site of metastases in advanced androgen-independent prostate cancer.
  • These metastases are primarily bone-forming, although the presence of osteolytic response has also been reported.
  • Bone-homing therapy is a strategy based on the popular seed-and-soil relationship between the epithelial malignant cells and the bone stroma.
  • Calcitriol (1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D3) and its synthetic analogs (deltanoids) are drugs that have a direct effect on both the skeleton and the invading metastatic cells and, therefore, are considered useful in the treatment of advanced prostate cancer.
  • In this article, I review the nature of the response induced by the malignant cells in the bone (bone formation or bone resorption) and how it affects the outcome of a vitamin D analog treatment in preclinical models of metastatic bone disease.
  • [MeSH-major] Bone Neoplasms / drug therapy. Bone Neoplasms / secondary. Vitamin D / analogs & derivatives
  • [MeSH-minor] Animals. Calcitriol / analogs & derivatives. Calcitriol / therapeutic use. Cell Line, Tumor. Humans. Male. Mice. Models, Biological. Osteoblasts / drug effects. Osteoblasts / metabolism. Osteoblasts / pathology. Osteolysis / drug therapy. Osteolysis / metabolism. Osteolysis / pathology. Prostatic Neoplasms / drug therapy. Prostatic Neoplasms / metabolism. Receptors, Calcitriol / metabolism

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  • (PMID = 17725485.001).
  • [ISSN] 1045-4403
  • [Journal-full-title] Critical reviews in eukaryotic gene expression
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Crit. Rev. Eukaryot. Gene Expr.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Review
  • [Publication-country] United States
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Receptors, Calcitriol; 1406-16-2 / Vitamin D; FXC9231JVH / Calcitriol
  • [Number-of-references] 64
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97. Zhu J, Jia X, Xiao G, Kang Y, Partridge NC, Qin L: EGF-like ligands stimulate osteoclastogenesis by regulating expression of osteoclast regulatory factors by osteoblasts: implications for osteolytic bone metastases. J Biol Chem; 2007 Sep 14;282(37):26656-64
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  • [Title] EGF-like ligands stimulate osteoclastogenesis by regulating expression of osteoclast regulatory factors by osteoblasts: implications for osteolytic bone metastases.
  • Epidermal growth factor (EGF)-like ligands and their receptors constitute one of the most important signaling networks functioning in normal tissue development and cancer biology.
  • Recent in vivo mouse models suggest this signaling network plays an essential role in bone metabolism.
  • Using a coculture system containing bone marrow macrophage and osteoblastic cells, here we report that EGF-like ligands stimulate osteoclastogenesis by acting on osteoblastic cells.
  • Addition of exogenous OPG completely inhibited osteoclast formation stimulated by EGF-like ligands, while addition of a neutralizing antibody against MCP-1 exhibited partial inhibition.
  • Coculture with bone metastatic breast cancer MDA-MB-231 cells had similar effects on the expression of OPG and MCP1 in the osteoblastic cells, and those effects could be partially abolished by the EGFR inhibitor PD153035.
  • Because a high percentage of human carcinomas express EGF-like ligands, our findings suggest a novel mechanism for osteolytic lesions caused by cancer cells metastasizing to bone.
  • [MeSH-major] Bone Neoplasms / secondary. Chemokine CCL2 / genetics. Epidermal Growth Factor / pharmacology. Gene Expression Regulation / drug effects. Osteoblasts / metabolism. Osteoclasts / physiology. Osteolysis / etiology. Osteoprotegerin / genetics


98. Emmanouilides C, Chourmouzi D, Dedes I, Pantoleon D, Mantziari P, Drevelengas A: Successful management of bulky osseous metastasis of renal cell carcinoma with selective arterial embolization and radiofrequency ablation: a case report. Cases J; 2009;2:6484
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  • [Title] Successful management of bulky osseous metastasis of renal cell carcinoma with selective arterial embolization and radiofrequency ablation: a case report.
  • The case of a 64-year-old male patient who presented with a bulky osseous tumor metastasis from renal cell carcinoma is reported.
  • The metastatic lesion extended from the acetabulum of the left iliac bone into the iliosacral joint.Treatment plan included selective arterial embolization followed by transdermal radiofrequency ablation, followed by consolidation irradiation.
  • This sequence resulted in considerable necrosis of the bulk of the tumor and creation of a large tissue deficit, which healed over the period of several months despite anti-angiogenetic systematic treatment.
  • This case illustrates the usefulness of the embolization-ablation sequence in controlling large osseus metastasis.

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99. Wilson TJ, Singh RK: Proteases as modulators of tumor-stromal interaction: primary tumors to bone metastases. Biochim Biophys Acta; 2008 Apr;1785(2):85-95
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  • [Title] Proteases as modulators of tumor-stromal interaction: primary tumors to bone metastases.
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  • (PMID = 18082147.001).
  • [ISSN] 0006-3002
  • [Journal-full-title] Biochimica et biophysica acta
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Biochim. Biophys. Acta
  • [Language] ENG
  • [Grant] United States / NCI NIH HHS / CA / CA72781; United States / NCI NIH HHS / CA / R29 CA072781; United States / NCI NIH HHS / CA / CA072781-08; United States / NCI NIH HHS / CA / R01 CA072781-08; United States / Howard Hughes Medical Institute / / ; United States / NCI NIH HHS / CA / R01 CA072781
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't; Review
  • [Publication-country] Netherlands
  • [Chemical-registry-number] EC 3.4.- / Cathepsins; EC 3.4.- / Peptide Hydrolases; EC 3.4.24.- / Matrix Metalloproteinases
  • [Number-of-references] 78
  • [Other-IDs] NLM/ NIHMS48535; NLM/ PMC2418859
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100. Takagi M, Arizumi T, Tanio Y, Shimura K, Miura S, Oba Y, Kodama M, Koma M, Kaneshiro S, Asano M, Fujiwara K, Shimamoto S, Araki N: [Multidisciplinary strategy for lung cancer patients with bone metastasis]. Gan To Kagaku Ryoho; 2008 Oct;35(10):1783-6
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  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] [Multidisciplinary strategy for lung cancer patients with bone metastasis].
  • The fall of QOL by bone metastasis poses a problem with the increase in lung cancer.
  • The examples of long-term survival of lung cancer are also increasing by progress of chemotherapy or molecular-targeted therapy.
  • Now, in addition to the conventional radiotherapy, the multidisciplinary treatment including a newer bisphosphonates or an orthopedic operation has been needed to bone metastasis of lung cancer.
  • We presented the lung cancer case who showed the symptoms in transcervical pathologic fracture and whose QOL was improved by orthopedic surgery, radiotherapy to bone metastasis, chemotherapy, gamma knife surgery, and treatment with zoledronic acid and gefitinib.
  • [MeSH-major] Bone Neoplasms / secondary. Bone Neoplasms / therapy. Lung Neoplasms / pathology. Lung Neoplasms / therapy

  • Genetic Alliance. consumer health - Lung Cancer.
  • Genetic Alliance. consumer health - Bone Cancer.
  • MedlinePlus Health Information. consumer health - Bone Cancer.
  • MedlinePlus Health Information. consumer health - Lung Cancer.
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  • (PMID = 18931589.001).
  • [ISSN] 0385-0684
  • [Journal-full-title] Gan to kagaku ryoho. Cancer & chemotherapy
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Gan To Kagaku Ryoho
  • [Language] jpn
  • [Publication-type] Case Reports; English Abstract; Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] Japan
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Carcinoembryonic Antigen
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